Tag » study
The phrase “queen bee” brings to mind Regina George, Heather Chandler, Cher Horowitz, even Miranda Priestly—ladies in charge. The term has also been used to describe a syndrome of top professional women keeping other women out of senior positions—something that's (surprise!) a myth, according to new research from Columbia Business School. Read More
We’re annoyed that workplace inequality is still A Thing, but as long as it persists, we need to keep talking about it. As you’re well aware, the wage gap is alive and well—and unlikely to close anytime soon. It’s also commonly known that some areas of the U.S. are much worse than others when it comes to circumstances for working women. Read More
Ask anybody (maybe not anybody) how much sex they’re having on the regs and you’ll get a range of answers—from, “all day, every day” to “3-4 times a week” to “I’m your mailperson, please don’t ask me that.” And all you can really do is trust their word; no statistic can be rubbed under their nose proving them lying sex-deprived losers. Read More
For years, it’s been a stigma that girls who say ‘like’, ‘I mean’, ‘um’, and other fillers are dumb. They don’t know how to speak! As a ‘liker’ myself, I’ve always been a bit self-conscious of the way I speak. It’s usually one of the first things that people notice about you – and it hurts to have people assign you to the category of “dumb girl” after a couple of sentences. Shaming young women for everything they do is a trend that people love to indulge in. Read More
A study at Northwestern University looks at the way we judge politicians to help explain the gender gap in politics. The study denies that people rationally consider candidates, and instead states, “research indicates that people use shallow decision heuristics, such as impressions of competence made solely from facial appearance when deciding whom to vote for. Read More
What happens when women are denied abortions? Sometimes, like Savita Halappanavar, they die. More typically, they give birth, keep the baby, fall below the poverty line, are forced to rely on public assistance, and are unable to keep a full-time job. The first scientific study on women denied abortions was presented last month, and science and entertainment website io9 has the details. Read More
A new study out of St. Louis confirms what all of us could have guessed: when given access to free birth control, women are less likely to have an unwanted pregnancy or get an abortion. More than 9,000 poor or uninsured women were given a choice of birth control methods available at no cost as part of the study conducted by the University of Washington in St. Louis on Thursday. The availability of free birth control led to only 4.4 to 7.5 abortions per 1,000 women involved, compared to an average of 13.4 to 17 per 1,000 women in the St. Read More
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