Tag » representation
It’s not exactly a secret that teen film—and really, the entire film industry—has a major whitewashing problem. Think of the protagonist of any popular teen movie: are they white? Almost definitely. Some Tumblr users who are also major Harry Potter nerds decided to combat this representation issue by creating a Harry Potter fanzine, its characters entirely people of color. (After all, the characters’ races are rarely specified in the books.) You can buy it on Etsy, and the results are charming and totally awesome. Check out some of the images below. Read More
Dylan Marron’s project Every Single Word is a simple premise with a powerful message: He edits mainstream movies and leaves only the speaking parts of people of color. The results? Usually, 30 or 40 seconds of screen time. Big hits (Her, American Hustle) and indie films (like Frances Ha) alike illustrate the shameful lack of representation for people of color in the mainstream film industry. (500) Days of Summer contains less than 30 seconds of content with a nonwhite speaker.   Moonrise Kingdom contains about 10 seconds.   Black Swan? 24 seconds. Read More
Representation matters—even in your iPhone’s Emoji inventory. Recently, the Emoji app incorporated more people of different skin tones, but their options for women are still lacking.  MAKERS, an organization that aims to create the largest-ever collection of women’s stories, made the call for “Femojis” in a blog post yesterday. They commented on why Apple's new Emoji "diversity" still leaves much to be desired: “While this initiative is certainly commendable, their collection of female emojis remains limited to being a bride, a princess, or a geisha. Read More
Rose McGowan has always been a BAMF, but lately she has been expressing more of her frustrations with Hollywood sexism and it is delicious. In an interview on DP/30 back in 2014, McGowan spoke about her career, but also on being objectified by media and realizing that she didn’t belong. IndieWire released a speech she delivered on April 21st to the Sisterhood of Traveling Producers which contains some awesome advice on how to deal with sexism in the industry and beyond. Read More
  Nigerian entrepreneur Taofick Okoya is making a name for himself with a line of dolls called “Queens of Africa.” After trying to purchase a doll for his niece at the store and finding only whitewashed toys, he realized  stores in Nigeria were not carrying black dolls—and decided it was a major problem (which, of course, it absolutely is). Okoya took matters into his own hands by creating products that “to promote a positive self-identity... as well as preserve African culture. Read More
Can I get an “Amen,” please?  The wonderful Laverne Cox has made herstory as the first out trans person to ever be nominated for an Emmy in acting!  Tune in for the results on August 25th at 8PM (EST) on NBC. The “Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series” nomination celebrates her portrayal of Sophia Burset, the beauty extraordinaire of Litchfield Correctional Facility on “Orange is the New Black”.  A breakout hit for Netflix, OITNB has also led to instant stardom for the talented cast. Read More
Recently, I saw the film 22 Jump Street and was very annoyed by all the, for lack of a better word, homoerotic (“why not heteroerotic?”) tension between some of the male characters. I was totally hoping for Channing Tatum’s character to get together with Zuke, the blond frat guy. The characters had total chemistry and whoever wrote that script clearly intended for there to be something more-than-friendship going on. Read More
Marnie Stern is mad. "I can't get one f***ing drink," she complains in the documentary I am Marnie Stern. Why can't one of the best metal guitarists have a beer at SXSW? Because she doesn't have a wristband, and nobody recognizes her. I've typed every variation of the phrase, "female guests sit in with 8G Band on Late Night with Seth Meyers," into search engines, but no cigar. This only proves what we all already know: it's not that there aren't women doing stuff in fields traditionally dominated by men, it's just that nobody talks about them. Read More
With the event of increasingly female-centric TV programs like Broad City and Girls, more often than usual we find ourselves yelling passionately at the screen, "Yes! Yes! That's exactly how it is!" That's the power of representation, and the reason it matters. Individuals who never feel kinship with what they see in media can wind up with a nasty sense of isolation. Seeing people with whom I can identify represented on TV makes me feel more comfortable with myself in general, because I don't feel like I need to hide anything about myself to be accepted. Read More
The New York Times covered a new initiative by Sheryl Sandberg's LeanIn.org via a partnership with Getty to update and diversify stock photo images of women because, in her words, "you can't be what you can't see."Via NYTimes: "The partnership is a way for Lean In to broaden its reach after criticism that Ms. Sandberg’s advice is relevant only to women in corporate America and that she places the burden of breaking through stereotypes on individual women instead of on workplaces and society. Read More