Tag » npr
If you grew up in the United States, at some point in your elementary education you were probably asked to craft, color, read about or dress up like pilgrims and Indians around this time of year. I distinctly remember standing with the rest of my classmates, donning a paper bonnet and apron, as we performed a skit about sailing on the Mayflower and landing at Plymouth Rock. It wasn’t until I was 20 years old that I actually learned some of the real history behind Thanksgiving—like that the settlers plagued Native Americans with all kinds of devastation. Read More
Imagine a world where men dominate and women are expected to fit into the societal boxes arranged for them. Not too hard to picture, right? Well in Bitch Planet, the amazing feminist comic from the minds of Kelly Sue DeConnick, not following suit with gender role expected of women lands you a spot on a prison planet with the label “terminally noncompliant. Read More
  Chrissie Hynde is still defending the victim blaming comments she made after there release of her memoir Reckless, only this time she has added a sprinkle of racism on top. Hynde, the iconic front-woman of The Pretenders, was fairly defensive and rude during her interview yesterday morning with NPR's David Greene.  Greene asked Hynde to describe some of the experiences she wrote about in her book–like the time she was assaulted by a group of bikers and proceeded to take responsibility for it. Read More
Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR), an NYC-based media watch organization, recently conducted its third study on the diversity of commentators on NPR. NPR is known as a liberal/intellectual media haven, so its lack of diversity is particularly disappointing—especially because NPR’s strategic plan includes an impending goal of featuring “stories at the intersection of race, ethnicity, and culture.” That’s pretty hard to do accurately with all white dudes as contributors. Read More
In Terry Gross's NPR interview with writer and editor Jessica Grose, professor of linguistics Penny Eckert, and speech pathologist Susan Sankin, the subject on the table was the policing of young women’s voices. “People are busy policing women’s language and nobody is policing older or younger men’s language,” Eckert says. Two of the speech tics discussed are uptalking (ending a sentence like it’s a question) and vocal fry (drawing out, or rasping, the ends of sentences). The clear double standard here? Men often employ these same tics. Read More
According to a recent report from the World Health Organization, transgender people are not getting adequate health care, and widespread discrimination is largely to blame. This really shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone, and it can be seen most clearly when you consider the extremely high rates of HIV among transgender women worldwide. Yesterday evening on All Things Considered, NPR’s Arun Rath spoke with JoAnne Keatley, one of the authors of this WHO report. Read More
Like any talented photographer, the late Mary Ellen Mark’s photos leave us wanting to know more about her unexpected subjects. Luckily, NPR’s Chris Benderev tracked down the child who was featured in one of Mark’s most memorable shots entitled, “Amanda and her Cousin Amy,” and here’s what we learned: The nine-year-old girl seen smoking a cigarette in the photo (shown above) is now known as Amanda Marie Ellison. She is 34 years old, lives in Lenoir, NC, and she says of the photo shoot, “Never forgotten it. Never in my life have I forgotten it. Read More
Obamacare is making wave in the Supreme Court: King vs. Burwell—a case that will decide whether or not the IRS can extend tax-credit subsidies to coverage purchased through healthcare exchanges established through the Affordable Care Act—will likely come to a close today. The final decision could impact access to healthcare for millions of women across the country. As it stands now, 14 states have their own healthcare exchanges (or marketplaces) that exist independently from the federal government; and 34 utilize the federal exchange. In 2014, 5. Read More
  Warning: This post contains a few spoilers. We at BUST know we aren’t alone in our Serial obsession. The popular podcast, which began in October, will have its final episode for this season on Thursday 12/18 and we want to have a conversation with you readers and listeners about how you think it will all end. Let our Serial Study Group commence! For those of you who may not know, Serial is a podcast hosted by journalist Sarah Koenig. Each week, Koenig walks the audience through aspects of the murder of Hae Min Lee, a high school senior in Baltimore who was killed in 1999. Read More
Check out this new video for Maya Angelou’s track “Pickin’ ‘Em Up,” off the recently released album, Caged Bird Songs. Named after her 1969 autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the album combines Angelou’s vocal performances with rad hip-hop and funk beats. Angelou’s grandson, Colin Johnson, told NPR that he hopes this blend will appeal to younger generations. "One of the things that she speaks to, for me at least, is our humanity and where we can go as a people coming together," he says. "It's a valuable message, no matter what generation. Read More