Tag » Afghan women
Sonita Alizadeh was just fifteen when her parents told her she going to be sold into an arranged marriage. It’s a sickening reality many young girls face in developing countries, where one in three will marry before age eighteen. Terrified of becoming a part of that statistic, Sonita resisted – by rapping. In a recent interview with PRI, she told her story. She grew up in Tehran, where a non-profit organization taught children things like photography and music. It was here that her passion for rapping would begin: “Rap music let’s you tell your story to other people. Read More
In Afghanistan, where having a son is vital for any respectable family, little girls are sometimes disguised and raised as boys.  Here, journalist Jenny Nordberg investigates this complicated cultural game of hidden identity. One of the eager-looking twins nods to reaffirm her words. Then she turns to her sister. She agrees. Yes, it is true. She can confirm it.fgha They are two 10-year-old identical girls, each with black hair, squirrel eyes, and a few small freckles. We are sitting on a gold-embroidered sofa in their home in Kabul, Afghanistan. Read More
“All female artists who work in Afghanistan today are risking their lives so that they can pave the way for other women.” These are the words of 24 year old Paradise Sorouri, Afghan’s first female rap singer. Born in Iran, Paradise makes up one half of the rap duo, 143—the other half being her fiancé, Diverse. Though the two started out singing about love and other familiar, tamer topics, their 2010 move from Herat, Afghanistan to Tajikistan inspired them to start writing songs about violence against women. Read More
25-year-old graffiti artist Shamsia Hassani is one of the handful of Afghan “art activists” who have been taking to the streets of Kabul to paint political pieces around the war-torn city. Her motivation is to bring art to Afghanistan and get people thinking. Before graffiti, the self-taught artist served as an associate professor of sculpture at Kabul University. Shamsia has traded traditional art for spray cans and stencils because she has realized that traditional art is a luxury that cuts out all but the educated. Read More
  In 2010, HBO premiered Afghan Star, a documentary about Afghanistan's version of "American Idol." The movie featured the story of Setara, a young woman whose head scarf slipped off while performing on the show. As you can imagine,  the quick reveal of her hair  sparked a controversy in the country. Read More
Facebook_websiteTwitter_websitePinterest_websiteRSS_websiteTumblr_websiteIG_website

Search