Category » Feminism
Amanda Filipacchi is an American feminist and novelist who has published three books. Her writing has been praised for its wit and humor, and Love Creeps made The Village Voice's top 25 books of the year in 2005. Imagine Filipacchi's surprise when she noticed that Wikipedia's "List of American novelists" page was slowly moving women into their own separate category, titled "American women novelists." The author read a note at the top of the article that explained the list was too long as only American novelists, and needed to be divvied up into subcategories. Read More
We've all heard the news: Washington Wizards basketball star Jason Collins has come out publicly. The interweb is in an uproar about it and his name is being thrown around left and right. I applaud Collins for his courage, as he is now the first openly gay male athlete active in a major American sport. But one name you won't see (and probably haven't seen) in your Twitter or Facebook feeds is that of college basketball player Brittney Griner. Read More
As one of many typically male-dominated industries, technology buffs should be bowing down to the women who have pursued these careers. These ladies have been hard at work and making some serious impact. Whether she's a venture capitalist, engineer, founder, co-founder, CEO, or COO, it's clear these amazing women have accomplished so much by the ripe age of 30. Read More
In our last post about B, we raised an eyebrow at her reluctance to call herself a feminist. Why? Because we believe she is a feminist and she should own it. That’s why we did a serious double-take at what Rakhi Kumar wrote about her in the Huffington Post last week. In “An Open Letter to Michelle Obama”, Kumar reprimands the first lady for recognizing Beyonce as a role model for her two daughters: “... Read More
While modern feminist conversations frequently fall on the topic of choice for professional women – do I choose my career, or do I choose motherhood – the argument generally stops there, and never addresses the choice some women make not to be a mother at all. American culture praises mothers, and rightly so, but we are also so obsessed with them that more frequently we lean on the topic of the right to choose an abortion or not, therefore overshadowing the other more obvious right to choose to ever get pregnant or not. Read More
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