Category » Feminism
A lot of kids today get flack for living their lives out loud on social media, but millennial posts are not all frivolous, silly, or pointless. Sometimes young people use social media to make some important points and speak up about real issues they face in a way that no other generation has been able to do. In this way, social media is actually pretty cool - it gets people to LISTEN UP. On Oct. 27, Carey Burgess, a senior at Beaufort High School, posted on Facebook about a dress code incident in which she had been involved. Read More
  At the end of September this year, a young woman in Arkansas posted a handful of photos onto Snapchat. In one photo, the young woman is smiling while her boyfriend points a gun at the back of her head. Another photo shows the same gun lying on the floor next to a small pile of ammunition. There is another photo of the couple, a selfie, again posing with the gun. Later that night, that woman was shot dead by her boyfriend. Read More
Acacia Fraternity is temporarily suspended from the Ohio University campus, pending an investigation of a video that was released on the evening of Oct. 28, according to The Huffington Post. The video taken by an OU journalism student, Olivia Hitchcock, shows a group of men serenading the women of Alpha Delta Pi from the porch of the sorority’s house. The sweet tune of the iconic “Hey Jude” by the Beatles is heard in the seven-second clip, but there’s one problem—the lyrics are perversely changed to “Send Nudes.” Gross. Read More
Kesha has been all but out of the spotlight since she filed a lawsuit against her former producer Dr. Luke last October accusing him of sexually abusing her. Now, unable to perform, the once-popular singer has fallen from the public eye. Hashtag campaigns like #freekesha are a testament to the loyalty of her fans, but are not enough in the face of the cold shoulder that the music industry has given her. No one will work with Kesha for fear of being sued by Sony music or Dr. Luke for interfering in an ongoing contract. Read More
She’s a woman, she’s 24-years-old, she's a Chinese immigrant and she’s running for a seat in Congress. Her name is Lindy Li, and she is ready to bring the millennial voice to Capitol Hill—but don’t dare call her a politician. “People call me that all the time, but I really don’t want that label. I feel like I won’t be comfortable with it until it is dissociated with so many things I don’t like. For example, conniving and selfish,” Li said in an interview with BUST. Read More