Category » Movies
Upside Down, from writer and director Juan Diego Solanas, depicts the love story of Adam (Jim Sturgess) and Eden (Kirsten Dunst): a couple separated by not only wealth and class differences, but physical gravities that pull in opposite directions. In this fantastical universe, they live on separate planets, which orbit one another. Eden, coming from a world of privilege, and Adam, from a world of poverty, meet as teenagers at the gravity barrier and fall in love. Read More
Flavorwire has posted an amazing list of the Baddest Girl Gangs on Film, and it's making me want to slap on my Doc Martens, pop the biggest bowl of popcorn ever, and watch every single one of the flicks they reference. No boys allowed… or ELSE.   Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! is one of my absolute favorites on the list--it'll inspire you to buy a dangerously fast car and get rid of anybody who's ever wronged you. Tura Satana (those bangs!) is my spirit animal now and forever more. Heathers is, of course, also seriously fierce. Read More
In addition to reprising her iconic role, actress Carrie Fisher claims that she may also bring back the infamous buns! “The bagel buns and the bikini,” Fisher told Palm Beach Illustrated, “because probably [Princess Leia] has sundowners syndrome. At sundown, she thinks that she’s 20-something. And she puts it on and gets institutionalized.” It seems she is over previous reports that wearing the buns make her feel, “Like an asshole. A complete undignified jerk off.” We’re all glad to hear it, Carrie. Read More
Taking an actual case as source material, director Alice Winocour's Augustine tells the story of neurologist Dr. Jean-Martin Charcot and the young woman who came to be his most famous patient. The film casts back to 19th century France, before Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalysis had taken the world of neurology by storm, and it was still very much in vogue to couch women’s mental illness in terms of “hysteria”. Read More
Rebecca Thomas’s debut feature Electrick Children is a crackling, captivating film that’s equal parts allegory and acid trip. At the center of the story is Rachel (Julia Garner), an inquisitive and rebellious teenager living in the mid-nineties. Julia has been raised by a fundamentalist Mormon family, living on a compound in Utah. On the occasion of her fifteenth birthday, Rachel is asked by her father and church leader (Billy Zane) to begin recording religious testimonies using an old-school cassette tape player. Read More