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Brooklyn-based blues rock band She Keeps Bees dropped a new single from their forthcoming album recently, and the video for the song is just as beautifully surreal and eerie as the single itself.  "Is What It Is" comes out on the album Eight Houses on September 16th from the label Future Gods, which will be the band's fourth full-length album. If you're into some soulful, dark, and dreamy music with goose bump-inducing vocals, the album is definitely something to look forward to. We can't wait to get our hands on it. Read More
Jenny Lewis’ new album The Voyager dropped yesterday. THIS IS NOT A DRILL. We reported on the amazing moustache-filled cross-dressing wonderment that was her music video for “One of the Guys,” starring our ladyloves Kristen Stewart, Anne Hathaway and Brie Larson, but the day is finally here. THE ALBUM HAS DROPPED. Former Rilo Kiley front woman Jenny Lewis has produced her third solo album in six years — a perfectly polished musical scrapbook of her wayward adventures — and it is pure girl power. Read More
Dan (Mark Ruffalo) is a shaggy-haired, chain-smoking, alcoholic divorced dad with a broken dream of running his own record label. Gretta (Keira Knightley) is a down-on-her-luck young New York émigré with a song in her heart and a battered past of her own. Begin Again is less about the new beginning these two lonely city dwellers find, and more about coming to terms with previous endings. Light on plot and heavy on stubbly Mark Ruffalo grins, Begin Again is perfect for a solo movie night. Read More
What do swimming pools, sexual voyeurism, elevators, and eco-terrorist extraterrestrials have in common? They’re all the subjects of songs on Hotel Valentine, Cibo Matto’s first release in 15 years. Much of the album is written from the perspective of a wry ghost who haunts a hotel and delivers deadpan lines like, “I had some cheese and seedless grapes for lunch and floated around for the rest of the afternoon.” The band’s Japanese-born, N.Y.C. Read More
Following her debut novel, The City is a Rising Tide, Rebecca Lee presents a collection of seven biting stories about the luxury we take in life’s ordinary comforts, and the threats, real or imagined, that lurk beyond the surface. As of this writing, Bobcat was longlisted for the international Frank O’Connor Prize for story collections, and the praise is due: with deadpan humor, Lee’s light touch illuminates the contrasts in everyday life—warmth and cold, past and present, beauty and terror—imbuing her realistic tales with quiet depth. Read More
New Girl Law is a post-Empirical, proto-fourth-wave-feminist memoir-cum-academic abstract that scrutinizes the current reality and future hope for women aspiring to positions of power in Cambodia. If that sounds heady, know that it also makes our country’s Mommy Wars look like child’s play—and proves, in the meantime, why we should be paying attention to Cambodia’s record of human rights and gender equity. Author Anne Elizabeth Moore, a Fulbright scholar and U.N. Read More
  Alida Nugent, of The Frenemy blog fame, has brought her witty snark to the literary world with this debut. The book—a collection of short essays on 20-something life—has fine writing and some genuinely funny lines, but I was initially put off by the subject matter. Nugent spends a lot of time bragging about failed attempts at maturity, seems to revel in her emotional and financial instability, and spends too many pages discussing how best to drink in front of your parents—all with a self-awareness that seems like an insincere exaggeration of her flaws. Read More
Two girls romp around the city, tap dancing and play fighting and falling asleep together like puppies. Except they’re not girls, they’re women, and they’re about to be smacked in the face by the reality of adult friendships. Frances (played by co-screenwriter Greta Gerwig) and Sophie (Mickey Sumner) are so tight that Frances turns down moving in with her boyfriend because she wants to keep living with Sophie. But when Sophie announces she wants to move in with someone else once their lease is up, Frances is heartbroken. Read More
Going to an Akron/Family show is like attending a hipster tent revival, so it’s fitting that the band’s sixth album is full of psychedelic hymns for its flannel-clad brethren. Mixing folk-y melodies with strange rhythms and switching time signatures and tempos constantly, the band has fully realized its signature genre on Sub Verses: prog folk. Expansive opener “No Room” is a primal waltz with a grinding, repetitive drumbeat and soaring, chant-like vocals. Read More
Virgin Soul is the fictional memoir of Geniece> Hightower, an aspiring journalist undergoing a journey of self-discovery during the Black Power movement in 1960s San Francisco. Divided into four sections, each dedicated to a year of her university schooling, the novel follows Geniece’s transition from focused scholar to revolutionary panther. While researching a story for her college newspaper, she meets Allwood, a highly intellectual activist who pulls Geniece into the rebellious world of the Black Panther Party. Read More