Tag » research
The phrase “queen bee” brings to mind Regina George, Heather Chandler, Cher Horowitz, even Miranda Priestly—ladies in charge. The term has also been used to describe a syndrome of top professional women keeping other women out of senior positions—something that's (surprise!) a myth, according to new research from Columbia Business School. Read More
Although the age of 49 does coincide with the generally accepted end of a woman’s child-bearing years, it does not signify the end of her life. So why do data collectors ignore older women? In a world in which decisions are made by conferring with polls, it is appalling that women above the age of 49 are completely left out of the equation. Most international data, which includes metrics on health, employment, assets and domestic violence, collects information on people from the ages of 15 to 49. Read More
We’re annoyed that workplace inequality is still A Thing, but as long as it persists, we need to keep talking about it. As you’re well aware, the wage gap is alive and well—and unlikely to close anytime soon. It’s also commonly known that some areas of the U.S. are much worse than others when it comes to circumstances for working women. Read More
According to a recent study by San Diego University, not much progress is being made in the movie biz regarding female directors, producers, and execs. The percentage of women doing major behind-the-scenes work -- from writers to cinematographers – was only 17%, which was the same number in 1998. This fact is even more disappointing when the data shows that it was a 1% increase from 2013’s figures. This means that there was a slight regress rather than any progress at all. What’s more, the number of films directed by women has declined to 7% versus the 9% it was in 1998. Read More
Recently, I came out as bisexual (surprise, Mom!) and was met with entirely positive reactions from everyone I told. However, before coming out I was terrified of telling people. I've heard bisexuals being totally discounted, and with rampant bi erasure and biphobia in media, spewed by people I know online and in real life, it's no wonder I was freaked. So, here's a list of myths that are as false as can be regarding bisexuality and pansexuality. Let's learn about the B in LGBTQIAP+! 1. Myth: Bisexuality doesn’t exist; people can only be monosexual. Read More
  There’s been a lot of buzz around a new study that examines the differences between male and female brains. The study, conducted by the University of Pennsylvania’s Ragini Verma and her colleagues and recently published in the journal PNAS, uses advanced imaging to map the connectivity of the left and right brain hemispheres of males and females. The researchers concluded that male and female brains have fundamental differences: males have more interconnectivity in each hemisphere, while women have more connectivity between the two. Read More
Over the past 20 years, psychologist David Lisak has been researching rape and sexual assault on college campuses. He's asked over 2,000 men questions like "Have you ever had sexual intercourse with someone, even though they did not want to, because they were too intoxicated [on alcohol or drugs] to resist your sexual advances?" His results? One in 16 men answered "yes" to some version of that question.  Lisak describes the "narcissism" of a rapist and how they are "very forthcoming" in talking about their offenses. Read More
Science, that all-knowing amorphous body of research and truth, is revealing more and more about the neurophysiological causes of spontaneous orgasm, specifically in women. In a recent analysis of this phenomenon, The New York Times science reporter William J. Broad investigates a Rutgers University project where female brains were scanned while thinking about erotic fantasies.  Broad recognizes that this isn’t a new idea: sexologist Havelock Ellis talks about spontaneous orgasm in his turn-of-the-century studies, and Kinsey Institute namesake Alfred C. Read More
Living in close quarters with your lady friends has many benefits, but studies show that menstrual synchrony—synced-up periods triggered by pheromones—may not be one of them. In her seminal 1971 study, psychologist Martha McClintock concluded that synced cycles are related to the exchange of pheromones between women in close social contact.     Besties!   However, a whole crop of studies have popped up since then that contradict the “McClintock effect”—and some that claim to disprove the existence of pheromones as a whole. Read More
As annoying as the characterization of women as sex objects in Fifty Shades of Grey may be, perhaps my friends have an excuse for enjoying it. A biological excuse. According to a recent study published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, our brains may recognize men and women differently. Specifically, they register females as body parts more easily than males. It's not just the male brain, either. Read More