Tag » new study
The July/August issue of Annals of Family Medicine provided a not-so-shocking discovery that women over the age of 60 are still having sex (and enjoying it). As a sexually active woman in my 20’s, I want to declare that I will never not (yes, that was a double negative) want to have sex and promise my opinion will be the same in 30 years time. Nobody should assume any woman becomes inactive after menopause, either, but that’s an entirely different subject on gender stigma we can save for later. Read More
A recent study confirms what many feminists already knew to be true: hardly any women regret having an abortion. This conclusion comes after a three-year research period involving over 600 women of all social backgrounds, which showed that 95 percent of women who have had abortions do not regret the decision to terminate their pregnancies. Researchers from the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health at UC San Francisco’s School of Medicine carried out the study, and it was published last week in the multidisciplinary academic journal PLOS ONE. Read More
According to a recent study by San Diego University, not much progress is being made in the movie biz regarding female directors, producers, and execs. The percentage of women doing major behind-the-scenes work -- from writers to cinematographers – was only 17%, which was the same number in 1998. This fact is even more disappointing when the data shows that it was a 1% increase from 2013’s figures. This means that there was a slight regress rather than any progress at all. What’s more, the number of films directed by women has declined to 7% versus the 9% it was in 1998. Read More
A new preliminary study conducted at John Hopkins University investigated how chemical compounds in broccoli, particularly broccoli sprouts, can improve behavioral symptoms of those with moderate to severe autism. The chemical called sulforaphane, is converted from glucoraphanin through the bacteria in our bodies when we eat the sprouts. The researchers turned glucoraphanin into sulforaphane and converted them into capsules so they could control the doses for those involved in the trial based on their weight. Read More
Attention ladies of the world! The time has come to start using that hot wax for aromatherapy candles and those razors for Sweeney Todd productions! Pubic hair removal is a thing of the past! At least that's what a new study from British pharmaceutical group UK Medix is telling me.  According to their statistics, 51% of women (out of 1,870 surveyed) "do not style or groom their pubic hair." 45% of these women attribute ditching the Sally Hansen to the simple fact that they can "no longer be bothered" with the annoyances of grooming. Read More
A study at the Columbia Business School recently exposed how, in the work place, women are asked for help more frequently, and that their help is less appreciated than that of their male counterparts.  Sharon Meers, contributor to the Wall Street Journal, thinks this behavior may be an after-effect of teaching our children that neatness and niceness are virtues primarily for girls. Later in life, she muses, women are looked at merely as "merry wives of the workplace. Read More
Ahhh...the sweet smell of awesome women: According to a new report compiled at the University of Montreal, lady doctors out-perform their male counterparts in every way. Yes, all of them.  The study observed the diabetes-related care provided by 870 physicians, with even numbers of male and female participants. The participants were scored on three different levels of diabetic care: prescribing eye exams, scheduling physicals, and prescribing a special mix of medications. In every category, men were outperformed by women. Read More
Though we didn’t need scientific research to confirm that sexual violence is a major problem among young adults, the statistics are now official: A study appearing in the journal JAMA Pediatrics surveyed 1,058 young adults and the revolting results indicated that 8% of Americans between the ages of 14 and 21 have committed some form of sexual violence, defined as “kissing, touching, or making someone else do something sexual” when the perpetrator “knew the other person did not want to.” 3% verbally coerced a victim into sex, or attempted physical force. Read More
Despite the stupid bra-burning feminist cliché, many of us are pretty grateful for some of the advantages of wearing a bra. They hide your nips from through-the-cloth display for all to see. If you’re big-breasted, they provide great support for all that weight. Even if you’ve got smaller boobs, it can still be uncomfortable to run without one. However, a French study has found that we might want to cut this piece out of our closets. The research showed that there are no medical benefits of wearing a bra and that it could be detrimental to breasts over long periods of time. Read More
A recent study by the Yale department of Psychology to determine the relationship between gender and body mass on jurors’ perceptions of guilt has proven that there actually is a correlation, sad as that may be. The study concluded that both weight and gender of a defendant may affect juror perceptions of guilt and responsibility, especially when a male juror is presented with an overweight female defendant. Read More