Tag » engineering
Some people think that jobs in engineering, which require some serious brainpower, are only held by men. It’s absolutely preposterous that a woman could do work in that field, right? You can't have children/wear dresses/do anything conventionally woman-like and be an engineer, right? Wrong. Thus, Isis Wegner created #ILookLikeAnEngineer to dismantle this sexist way of thinking. Here’s some of the lovely ladies of technology:   All images via Twitter Read more on BUST. Read More
LEGO has been one of the most popular toys for nearly one hundred years now. It has remained popular for so long because not only do you get to play with LEGOs, you get to build them. LEGO has gotten cooler as they’ve added more and more female characters, including many women involved in STEM. There continues to be a large gender gap in many STEM programs. Though there may be greater equality in fields such as biology and chemistry, men still vastly outweigh women in computer science and engineering fields. Read More
Tech companies often blame their lack of gender diversity on what some call a "leaky pipeline," or a surge of women leaving engineering. But a new LinkedIn analysis of its members' data suggests that the lack of female engineers working in tech can't be so easily explained away. The report, released last week, found that the tech sector employs proportionally fewer female engineers than several other industries, including healthcare, retail, government, education, and nonprofits. Read More
  Pink is for girls, and blue is for boys. Girls want to be pretty; boys want to be smart. We’ve heard this nonsense before, yes? Well, it seems like companies are finally catching on: 1950s gender norms and prejudicial limitations should stay in the past. The present is about empowering children to dream and play however they wish! That’s why Goldie Blox is basically the best ever. A biting response to all the toys that teach us that brushing our hair is the only fun activity we can partake in, this company’s toys are designed for girls who want to be engineers. Read More
  The artist Addie Wagenknecht is known for her critical examinations of internet culture. In the past, she has staged performance art pieces revealing the appeal of anonymity. She has created internet pages that refuse to load, revealing our urgent need for gratification through imagery. In Brussels’s recent Digital Now exhibit, she uses the internet and technology, tools that she admits are generally controlled by men, to create groundbreaking and sometimes unsettling portraits of modern womanhood. Read More
When I was in junior high school, I went to a “Women in Science” event at the local university. I learned about solar panels (awesome), and I got to feed a deadly centipede from South America through a tube (creepy and awesome). It was great to be exposed to women working in science, because it made me feel like I could do it too. Sadly, these types of programs are few and far between. Read More
Just a few days ago, the BUST blog reported on the huge fail of a campaign that the European Commission launched in a somewhat laughable attempt to “overturn clichés” related to women and science.  Now a recent series on the Txchnologist blog reminds us that, though there definitely aren’t enough women in science at the moment, women have done amazing things to help move our world forward for centuries. And Txchnologist somehow manages to convey the message all in a totally inoffensive (and lipstick-free) manner! Take note European Commission. Read More