Tag » books
  Reviewed by Molly Labell Lizz Winstead is responsible for creating The Daily Show and for setting the progressive tone of the now defunct Air America, platforms that—bless her!—brought both Jon Stewart and Rachel Maddow into the national spotlight. With her new book of personal essays, Winstead will undoubtedly be responsible for inspiring sc-ores of creative and opinionated young women. Read More
Whether you roll your eyes whenever your mom urges you to “just give it a chance,” or you’ve recently gotten “Christian Grey” tattooed to your left breast, chances are you’ve at least heard of the recent erotic phenomena known as Fifty Shades of Grey. Now that we’ve established the fact that you don’t live under a rock, I think it’s safe to assume you may have heard of Bret Easton Ellis as well, author of such harrowing works as American Psycho, Less Than Zero, and The Rules of Attraction (If not, it’s called Google, people!). Read More
Ever since I can remember, I’ve been a bit of a Nancy Drew nerd. When I was little, I would usually read one book from the series a day, curling up underneath my covers until the late hours of the night with my flashlight in hand, so my parents wouldn’t know I was still awake, finishing the remaining chapters. I eventually started creating my own “spy gear,” sneaking around the house (unsuccessfully), attempting to find a mystery to solve. Read More
  Reviewed by Erica Wetter Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life By Natalie Dykstra (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) You’ve probably never heard of Clover Adams, but as English Professor Natalie Dykstra illuminates in this detailed biography of the 19th-century Washington socialite, she rubbed elbows with many of the nation’s elite. “A perfect Voltaire in petticoats,” friend Henry James commented. “Certainly not handsome” her husband-to-be bluntly lamented to a friend. Read More
  Reviewed by Melynda Fuller Barnheart: The Incurable Longing for a Farm of One’s Own By Jenna Woginrich (Storey) At some point, every city-dweller utters the words, “I wish I could just move to the country and start a farm.” In her new memoir, writer Jenna Woginrich lays out that idyllic landscape found so often in the deep sighs of those who feel trapped by urban life. After a short stint as a homesteader in Idaho, Woginrich takes a job in rural Vermont, set on establishing the life of a farmer. Read More
Reviewed by Amber Tamblyn The Bigger World By Noelle Kocot (Wave Books) Noelle Kocot’s 2006 book Poem For The End Of Time and Others Poems—a collection about the death of her husband and the subsequent burning cyclone of grief that followed—contains some of the most painful and powerful verses ever unearthed on the subject. But today, Kocot is looking at The Bigger World (Wave Books) and telling the dark, triumphant, and often surreally imagined stories of others. Read More
I love books. A lot. I have a book in my purse at all times (last month it was The Small Room by May Sarton, right now it’s The Russian Dreambook of Color and Flight by Gina Ochsner—next up will be Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger) and spend many of my lunch breaks browsing at Barnes & Noble. For part of our summer holiday, my college roommate and I went to the little town of Hay-on-Wye, Wales, which makes its living off bookshops; there are about two dozen of them there. (That’s when you know you’re a book lover, by the way. Read More
Flavorwire recently ran a piece on “10 Legendary Bad Boys of Literature,” and, as game as I am for any discussion of Lord Byron’s poetry/incestuous affairs/commitment to culturally-appropriated fashion, I couldn’t help but agree with one commenter that the “bad girls” of literature deserved their due-- and are, in fact, even more compelling than their male counterparts.  Luckily, Flavorwire editor Judy Berman responded to the call, and compiled a list of ladies who broke rules and wrote game-changing, enduring literature. Read More
                                       I’ve never shared my missed connections with the World Wide Web, but that doesn’t mean I don’t like reading the ones that other people post. From the woman who’s trying to find the guy who was eating beef chili to the man looking for the girl on the C train with the oyster.com bag, you can’t help but wonder if any of these people, well...connect. Apparently Sophie Blackall wondered the same thing. Read More
The St. Mark’s Bookshop opened in 1977 on New York’s Lower East Side and has become a well-loved cultural establishment, attracting and embracing a devoted following inside its literature-lined walls. Bibliophiles cite the shop’s vast collection of unique tomes as well as its cozy-but-cultured atmosphere as reasons to frequent the shop--indeed, it has become a haven for students and famous authors alike. Read More