In artist Yolanda Dominguez’s video, “Ninos vs. Moda,” a bunch of wise eight-year-olds are shown various images from fashion campaigns and asked to describe them. The unsurprising results? Women are portrayed as being sick, drunk, in danger, fighting, passed out, even thrown in the trash—and men are superheroes, studying for university, and the bosses of good companies. Women are presented as powerless, while men are powerful; what else is new? Watch the adorable (and revealing) video below.   Via www.latina.com Image via www.latina.com Read More On Bust. Read More
Thinking about proposing to that special someone? Awesome, good for you! Thinking about uploading the image to Instagram or other social media platforms? Do. Not. Do. It. Why? Because your friends really don't care, despite the amount of attention the photo may get. Don't believe us? Here's proof:  Zach Broussard is the brain behind this clever prank, and is no stranger to fake brags on social media. In fact, this comedian centers his entire act around Twitter goofs. His prank utilized random strangers proposing to his real life girlfriend of four years and vice versa. Read More
Well, shit. “The names and contact information for more than 300 Planned Parenthood employees have been published on a private website hosted by a group of hackers, part of an organization called 3301,” according to the Los Angeles Times. By publishing this confidential information, the hackers are putting the employees at risk for harassment and physical harm, endangering them and their families. Read More
While filming an episode of Running Wild With Bear Grylls, actress Kate Winslet opened up about body issues and insecurities. “When I grew up, I never heard positive reinforcement about body image from any female in my life… That’s very damaging, because then you’re programmed as a young woman to immediately scrutinize yourself and how you look,” she says. Even glamour queens like Winslet face these pressures. “I was bullied at school,” she says. “I was chubby, always had big feet, the wrong shoes, bad hair. Read More
The empty chair sits next to the 35th woman in a recent New York Magazine project shedding light on Bill Cosby’s sexual assaults. Although the front-facing, emotionless women send a powerful message, the empty chair speaks louder than all of their words combined. It symbolizes the 11 women who accused Cosby of assault, but did not allow their photo to be captured for the project – even worse, it symbolizes the numerous other women who may have been assaulted and have yet to come forth. Read More