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Living

As we draw closer to the midterm elections, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama are pushing for all Americans to seriously consider our country's future. As the current administration deteriorates into more of a moral clusterfuck than anyone could have predicted, it’s becoming more difficult to keep track of core issues between all the information and Twitter distractions. As Clinton puts it in an op-ed, published on Sunday in The Atlantic, “I think that may be the point—to confound us, so it’s harder to keep our eye...

Here, I bring you three separate, but equally intriguing, dog anecdotes from the 19th century. The first involves a Scottish Terrier and a lady’s white petticoat. The second involves a Bulldog and a surgeon. And the third and final tale gives us a little insight into the professional and working class souls of 19th century canines. The Scottish Terrier and the PetticoatMr. Liang, who was steward to General Sharp of Houston, near Uphall in Scotland, had a terrier dog. This particular little dog was well known...

  Freakebana (a name coined last year by an editor at The Cut and pronounced freak-eh-ba-na) is the mutant stepsister of ikebana, the Japanese art of arranging flowers. Ikebana dates back to the sixth century and utilizes natural objects that you can find in your vicinity, like rocks, branches, seedpods, and blooms. It’s more about letting the flowers do their thang as opposed to arranging them in a meticulous way like most mainstream Western bouquets. While ikebana highlights minimalism and balance, freakebana’s primary focus is doing whatever the hell you...
As children, we were asked, “What do you want to do with your life when you grow up?” As teens and young adults, we may jump from major to major and profession to profession in reckless pursuit of our true identity, as we try to find the ideal fit. After 28 years of this, Father Time knocks on our door, asking us, “Who do you want to be now that you’ve grown up?” Now that we are no longer children, in the eyes of the...

 I’ve been building altars for as long as I can remember—of course, I didn’t realize back in 1999 that my nightstand covered in journals, a dozen Tamagotchi keychains, love letters to Spike from Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and pieces of jade (it is my name, after all) counted as one. That’s the beauty of an altar: it’s an aesthetic manifestation of what you want it to be, look, and feel like—there are no rules. Defined simply, an altar is a sacred place one can decorate, visit, and...
Helen Gurley Brown recalled that she was “taking a bath or making a sandwich or something like that,” when the thought occurred to her, “Why don’t we put a picture of a naked man in Cosmo? Wouldn’t that be fun?” It was the early 1970s; she had taken over the reins of the nearly century-old Cosmopolitan magazine in 1965 and turned it into a publication for the kind of kicky, career-oriented, sexually adventurous, unmarried woman she’d described in her 1962 bestseller Sex and the Single...
  The ancient Japanese art of sashiko—using a running stitch to mend and embellish fabric—is the perfect way to fix worn clothes, breathe new life into old favorites, and give all manner of projects a super cool aesthetic, as this new book, Make + Mend (out August 21) proves. With easy to follow, step-by-step instructions, author Jessica Marquez offers up sashiko-inspired items for making (a quilted clutch; patchwork table linens; a shibori bandana, pictured), as well as ways to mend (pattern darning, patching jeans, altering hems)....
There is an epidemic within the medical community of doctors gaslighting women with chronic illness. In her Medium article "Healthcare is Sexist," Katharina Schöffmann details her experience with Endometriosis. The surgeon she went to accused her of just having anxiety and exaggerating her pain in order to get pain medication. She says that even though she knew he was clearly the wrong surgeon for her, she "would have endured anything just for the chance to be fixed." The surgeon did not believe her until after...

Shanghai, the most populated city in the world and the global epicenter of China, is still largely shrouded in mystery to many. I have to admit, when I moved here a few years ago to teach English, my perception of the city was warped and misinformed, based on outdated propaganda from the West. Most people harp on the perceived restrictions put on citizens, however, there’s plenty of innovation and creativity thanks to Chinese millennials and expats who are changing the cultural landscape. Shanghai is a...
During the 18th and 19th century, patent medicines were everywhere. These various powders, potions, elixirs, and cordials were primarily peddled by quacks, some of whom purported to be doctors from respected universities like St. Andrews in Scotland. The claims they made on behalf of their products were extraordinary. According to advertisements of the era, a restorative cordial or tonic could do practically anything, from curing dropsy in children to curing impotence in men and hysteria in women. Some even proclaimed that they could cure a...