Tag » journalism
Alex T. Williams, a PhD student in communications at the University of Pennsylvania has noticed a trend in today's media. Williams isn't the only one, though. In fact, it doesn't take a genius to see the lack of minorities in our newsrooms.  So what's the deal? Isn't it 2015? Why aren't we progressing and providing a different angle and perspective in the media?  Williams believes there are three key factors: 1) Minority students are less likely to work for their campus newspaper, because they either attending a college without a newsroom or threatened by being the minority. Read More
Trailblazing broadcast journalist, news writer, producer, professor, and documentarian Marlene Sanders passed away in hospice at the age of 84 on Tuesday. Even as a journalism major, I was shocked to find I didn't know how groundbreaking her work was. Sanders was one of the first women in TV journalism, working her way up from an assistant to an exec, to an assistant producer, then a writer and producer, then a correspondent, eventually becoming an executive in addition to an anchor. Read More
Hacking is great, but only when the hackers are on your side. Unfortunately, last Friday September 5, the International Women’s Media Foundation was hacked, defaced and had most of its original content destroyed. The IWMF is a foundation that supports the empowerment of women journalists worldwide. As the website stated in a blog post September 12, the hacker was based out of Turkey, and due to the severity of the attack it is suspected the hack was intended to deliberately prevent IWMF from doing its work for women in the media. Read More
The Vagenda began as a blog forum for UK post-grads Holly Baxter and Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett, to critique and contribute to the women’s press. Initially, the duo simply flipped through magazines cynically and aired their displeasure to one another. They said, “The women’s press so frequently is completely divorced from what we thought would make an interesting magazine. “ But thankfully these gals decided to move forward and disseminate their thoughts and opinions into the expansive World Wide Web. Read More
    Alas, friends – a study published today by the Women's Media Center confirms an upsetting (if not so surprising) truth: male journalists and news anchors still make up a hefty majority the big old American media engine. According to the report, “at ten of the nation's most widely circulated newspapers, men garnered 63 percent of bylines, compared to 37 percent for women.” Ouch. The study did take note of a few exceptions to the testoste-curve: PBS' “NewsHour” and ABC's “World News” have enlisted women as primary anchors. Read More