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Movies

Real-life sisters Jemima and Lola Kirke star in the relationship drama Untogether. As in real life, their characters, Andrea (Jemima Kirke) and Tara (Lola Kirke), are separated by about five years and an accent—Andrea has a British accent, while Tara has an American accent. While writer/director Emma Forrest said in a Tribeca Film Fest Q&A that having the actors keep their original accents were simply a practical decision—actors perform better when they’re not thinking about whether they’re doing their fake accent right—the way the sisters...
From The Parent Trap to The Holiday to It’s Complicated, director Nancy Meyers movies' are part of today's comedy canon. And as Meyers' career has grown from her start as a 22-year-old production assistant on the Price Is Right, the world has changed. In conversation with film critic Carrie Rickey during Tribeca Film Festival on April 26, Meyers—now 68—recalled the ridiculously sexist line in her contract during the filming of 1980’s Private Benjamin: although she was a writer and producer on the movie, Meyers wasn’t allowed...
  Disobedience’s buzz precedes it—it’s the “Orthodox Jewish lesbian movie” starring two famous Rachels, Weisz and McAdams, and it’s been making headlines for its intense sex scene. The reality of the movie is more nuanced. Wesiz stars as Ronit, a photographer living in New York. She’s in the middle of taking a portrait an elderly, shirtless man covered in tattoos when the phone rings: Ronit’s estranged father, a powerful rabbi, has died. We see Ronit process the news by going to a bar, fucking a male stranger...
  The new documentary Love, Gilda, which premiered at Tribeca Film Fest this week, seems to do the impossible by having comedian Gilda Radner herself narrate the documentary, despite having died in 1989. Director Lisa D’Apolito gained access to dozens of hours of Radner's voice recordings (which Radner made in preparation for her posthumously published memoir), unpublished diaries, and letters to her mother. D'Apolito pairs Radner's own words with TV and movie footage, showing Radner's performances as an original cast member of Saturday Night Live (then...
It’s hard to believe that it’s been more than five years since a rape case in Steubenville, Ohio made national—and international—news. The new documentary Roll Red Roll, directed by Nancy Schwartzman and premiering at Tribeca Film Festival, revisits the Steubenville rape case, tracing what we know about what happened that night; examining how and why the rape case made international news; and exploring the state of rape culture then and now. Schwartzman tells the story through interviews with people involved in the rape case, as well...
In a Q&A at the end of the Tribeca Film Festival premiere, Little Woods director Nia DaCosta joked that upon hearing the plot, some New Yorkers asked her if the movie took place in the past or in a dystopian future. Nope—the movie takes place in the present, in a the fictional Little Woods, North Dakota, a rural fracking town where most people live below the poverty line, opioid addiction is commonplace, and the nearest abortion provider is hundreds of miles away. Tessa Thompson stars as...
  The premise of Duck Butter will make you take notice: Two young women (played by Alia Shawkat and Laia Costa) meet at a bar and feel a spark, so they decide to spend the next 24 hours together. The catch? They have to have sex once an hour. Directed by Miguel Arteta, co-written by Arteta and Shawkat, and filmed in just 24 hours, Duck Butter—which premiered at Tribeca Film Fest on April 20—is sometimes sexy and sometimes funny, but also sometimes...a little boring. To be fair,...
Blowin’ Up, which premiered April 21st at Tribeca FIlm Festival, divulges the everyday realities of an experimental courtroom in New York City working to change the way that women who have been arrested for prostitution are prosecuted. The documentary, directed by Stephanie Wang-Breal, is a beautiful exploration of both the courtroom and the lives of the women who operate it. The courtroom, headed by Judge Toko Serita, is run almost entirely by women, and is clearly a space built by and for women. Many of the...
In NANA, Serena Dykman traces the life of her late grandmother, Maryla Dyamant, after she was sent to Auschwitz and, as a survivor, her lifelong dedication to sharing her story. Serena and her mother, Alice Michalowski, embark on a journey through Europe to do so, visiting Maryla’s hometown in Poland; meeting with her students, friends and interviewers; and ultimately visiting Auschwitz. The film is not simply a retelling of the horrors of the Holocaust, but a story of a mother and daughter navigating intergenerational trauma...
  If you see A Quiet Place in a theater, about two minutes in you’ll be cringing at the sounds of people chewing popcorn—and a few minutes later, you’ll be too terrified to notice. The movie is almost completely silent: it follows a family trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic world full of blind monsters with super-hearing. The monsters can’t see you, but if they hear you, they’ll kill you—immediately. As we see in an early scene in which a child gets killed after playing with...