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General

According to historians, the legend of the unicorn first emerged in 398 BC, courtesy of the Greek physician Ctesias. Ctesias wrote an account of India, titled Indica. In it, he attests that all recorded within his account are things that he has witnessed himself or that he has had related to him by credible witnesses. This account of India, though largely lost, has been preserved in a fragmentary abstract made in the 9th century by Photios I of Constantinople. In the twenty-fifth fragment, Ctesias writes of the...
The third of Henry VIII’s wives, Jane Seymour, is mainly remembered as the one that Henry liked the most (which is kind of damning with faint praise) and erm…that’s kind of it. She’s sort of seen as the wet flannel of his wives. Nice and mainly inoffensive, but…well, she had a reputation as boring. BUT that couldn’t be more wrong, you see: Jane Seymour was a wily motherfucker. And I mean that in the best way possible. Prepare to have all your perceptions of Jane smashed! So before we get...
In December of 1888, the Gloucester Citizen reported on the arrest of a Parisian dog thief. Mind you, this was not a human who dognapped canines. It was, in fact, a dog who regularly absconded with goods from the fashionable shops of Paris. This dog thief is described as “a big Newfoundland.” On the day of his arrest, he entered a large shop located near the Bastille. According to the Gloucester Citizen: “After having ‘prospected around’ for some time, [he] selected a bundle of shooting jackets, seized them between...
 Keeping an indie magazine afloat for 25 years is no easy feat. This year marks our 25th anniversary, and to celebrate, founders Debbie Stoller and Laurie Henzel sat down to talk all about the history of BUST and the importance of feminist media, from 1993 to now.  “We were the first generation of women to really be raised with feminism,” says Debbie, BUST’s Editor-in-Chief. “We learned about feminism as kids, and when we got into young adulthood, all the women’s magazines out there were just talking about...

In medieval London, ravens were a common sight. By the late eighteenth century, however, they had been almost entirely eradicated. According to nineteenth century ornithologist William Henry Hudson, the last pair of wild ravens in London resided in a large elm tree in Hyde Park. This pair bred annually up until 1826 when one of the park keepers pulled down their nest, which at that time contained two of their young offspring. Deprived of their home and their young, the pair of old ravens quit...
On the evening of Wednesday, July 25, 2018, we discovered via Tasbeeh Herwees' Twitter thread that a piece in our August/September 2018 print issue titled "Shoplifters of the World" plagiarized quotes and reporting from Herwees' feature titled "We R Cute Shoplifters," published in Good magazine in June 2016. The piece was pitched to us by a freelancer and we accepted it. In our fact-checking process, we failed to discover the plagiarism, which we are very embarrassed about. If we had known the piece included plagiarism,...
On June 24th, four-year-old Luz Gonzalez and her mother Reyna Candia were hit by an SUV outside of Clean City Laundry in Bushwick, a neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York, reports Gothamist. They were taken to Wyckoff Hospital, where Luz was pronounced dead and Reyna had her injuries treated. Meanwhile, Jeanette Maria, the driver who ran them over on the sidewalk and then fled the scene, was stopped by the police but not arrested nor charged. Luz’s body was flown to Mexico, where their extended family still...
In January 1818, on the second page of a small Irish newspaper, was a brief article with the sensational headline: “Projected Divorce in High Life.”  This case, which would soon become notorious in both England and France, was not, in fact, a divorce. It was an action for criminal conversation—a tort, long extinct, in which an aggrieved husband could make a claim for damages against the lover of his adulterous spouse.  These sorts of cases were always deliciously scandalous, and none more so than that...
Congratulations, Tammy Duckworth! Tammy Duckworth’s office announced that the Illinois senator’s daughter, Maile Pearl, was born yesterday—making Duckworth the first senator to give birth while in office. Though she served in the House of Representatives when she gave birth to her first daughter, Abigail, in 2014, Duckworth took maternity leave. This time, CNN reports, Duckworth was determined to stay in D.C. in case she needed to vote. Read more on CNN Politics. F.B.I. Raids Trump’s Lawyer’s Office Yesterday morning, F.B.I. agents raided Trump’s longtime confidant and lawyer...
McWomen’s Day, Anyone? To celebrate International Women’s Day, McDonald’s took an interesting stand against the patriarchy by turning the trademark golden arches upside down at a location in Lynwood, California, and all over social media. Toygar Bazarkaya, the chief creative officer of the agency that helped pioneer the idea, said that it is “as simple as it is bold” in a statement. Many people are rightfully criticizing the company for celebrating women through a bizarre performative campaign instead of, you know, providing change and support for...