The future of science may rest in the hands of women. In each of the three age groups at Google's first science fair, three girls were the chosen winners among 7,500 entrees from 91 countries. 

And not only were these projects scientifically impressive--they also may be used to benefit public health. Lauren Hodge, winner of the youngest group of 13-14 year olds looked at carcinogenic levels in various marinades for grilled chicken. Winner among 15-16 year olds, Naomi Shah, found ways to reduce people’s reliance on asthma medications by improving indoor air quality. Shree Bose of the 17-18 year old group, and winner of the Grand Prize, made a “groundbreaking discovery,” according to Google, having discovered a way to improve ovarian cancer treatments for patients who have built up a resistance to chemotherapy drugs. Shree says to the NY Times, “As a girl, to see that my gender actually is going to come into this field that’s been so dominated by men is exciting to me, and to be a part of that is even more exciting.

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The winners received some phenomenal prizes: Naomi and Lauren received $25,000 scholarships and internships at Google and LEGO, while Shree received a $50,000 scholarship, a trip to the Galápagos Islands with National Geographic Explorer, and an internship at CERN. Hope these girls have some shades, because their futures are glaringly bright!

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After the success of its inaugural event, Google plans on having yearly science fairs, so if you’re interested in getting involved in the future, or if you want more information on these awesome projects, check out their site here.

Image/Source: The Official Google Blog (Google has a blog!? They even have a typo! I must say, I find this endearing.)

 

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