If plants could go to high school, succulents would win “Most Popular” in the yearbook. They’re everywhere lately, probably because they work as well in modern décor as they do in retro and rustic settings. As the founder 
of shopruche.com—a shopping/lifestyle site—I made sure our offices were decorated with succulents aplenty. And if you want to bring succulents indoors, but more inventively than just plopping them in a ceramic pot, try this framed assortment.

It’s easy to care for, and best of all, you can personalize this project depending on the type of frame and paint you like best.

ADVERTISEMENT

Supplies:

  • Assortment of your favorite succulents
  • Wooden hinged shadow box (found at Michaels and other craft stores)
  • 1/2" hardware cloth
  • E6000 Craft Adhesive (find at craft stores)
  • Krylon Spray Paint (optional)
  • 1" binder clips
  • Power drill (optional)
  • Corkscrew (optional)
  • Potting soil
  • Pencil

Instructions:

Cut rosettes and other bits from your succulents, leaving at least a 1–2" stem; lay flat and let dry for a couple of days.



On the back of your shadow box, create several 1/2" drainage holes, using a power drill or a corkscrew. Cut your hardware cloth to your shadowbox’s frame dimensions, minus 1/2" on all sides. With the shadowbox open, use E6000 to glue your hardware cloth onto the back of the frame. To secure the cloth to the frame, clamp it in place with binder clips. Let dry completely. Now glue your shadowbox shut, close it tight and place weights on top; allow to dry for a full day.

If you like, spray paint your shadowbox the color of your choice.
Once the paint’s dry, fill the box with soil—scoop it on top of the hardware cloth and shake it through until the soil reaches the back of the cloth. Start planting! Stick your pencil through one of the cloth’s grid squares to poke a hole in the soil . Plant the first succulent into the hole, with the leaves sticking out of the cloth.

New Fall Issue d217c

Arrange the succulents as you see fit, and repeat the previous step until the entire grid is filled .

Place your completed display face up on a flat surface in bright, indirect light for two weeks or so. This will give the succulents time to root themselves to the soil. Don’t water or expose them to full sun until the roots have latched. Display your masterpiece! You can hang it up, prop it against a sunny wall, or give it a spot on a table or shelf. To keep it fresh, take the arrangement down twice a month and add water just until you see it escape the drainage holes; don’t overwater.

 

By Mai Olivo
Photos by Kae Lacy

This story originally appeared in the Aug/Sept 2014 print edition of BUST Magazine. 
Subscribe now and get this shit delivered right to your mailbox!

Support Feminist Media!
During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com.
Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.

 DONATE NOW