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Books

Our April/May 2018 book reviews are now online! Check out BUST’s favorite reads this spring, including new novels by Meg Wolitzer, Melissa Broder, and more. Don’t forget to subscribe here! Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the InternetBy Claire L. Evans(Portfolio) If you’ve seen Hidden Figures (or even if you haven’t), it won’t come as a surprise that the contributions of women have been largely left out of the history of computing. The irony is that “computer” originally referred to a human computer,...

Our April/May 2018 Pop Quiz by BUST editor Emily Rems is all about Joan Didion.  Journalist, essayist, novelist, memoirist, playwright, and screenwriter Joan Didion is a literary giant famous for exploring American cultural flux. Think you know what makes this 83-year-old dynamo go, go, go? Then take the quiz!Joan was born on December 5, 1934, in _______, and she was already writing by age five.a. Brooklyn, NYb. Ontario, Canadac. Sacramento, CAd. Liverpool, England Joan wrote her 2005 National Book Award-winning memoir, The Year of Magical Thinking, in...
It’s 2018, and for the first time, a novel by an Equatorial Guinean woman is being translated into English. That woman is Trifonia Melibea Obono, a journalist and political scientist who researches women and gender in Africa; the novel isLa Bastarda (Feminist Press), a queer coming-of-age story that numbers less than 100 pages. Our main character is a teenage girl named Okomo, who lives with her grandfather, his two wives, and their children. Okomo’s mother died in childbirth, before Okomo’s father could pay a dowry, so Okomo is...
From our April/May print issue, here's our book review sidebar focused on three new nonfiction books about reproductive health — or, as we put it, "experts go deep on vaginas, uteri, clitorises, and feeling good under the hood." Ask Me About My Uterus: A Quest to Make Doctors Believe in Women’s PainBy Abby Norman(Nation Books) What if you were symptomatic every day with pelvic pains worse than menstrual cramps, but no one, health professionals included, understood what your body was feeling? In Ask Me About My...
The prolific painter Edgar Degas once said, “Painting is easy when you don’t know how, but very difficult when you do.” Certainly, to be an artist is to struggle — but there are ways to cultivate that struggle into great art, and live a satisfying, fulfilling life as an artist. LA-based art consultant Beth Pickens wrote Your Art Will Save Your Life (Feminist Press) to reach artists she cannot help on a one-on-one basis. Trump’s takeover of the White House was the final nudge Pickens needed...
tatiana de la tierra was a print-based activist, feminist dyke, and bilingual writer. During the '90s, tatiana founded, edited, and contributed to the transnational Latina lesbian zines esto no tiene nombre and conmoción. The zines, publishing work in English, Spanish, and Spanglish, featured contributors from all over the US, Caribbean, Latin America, and Europe. They focused on feminism, multicultural identities, queer desire, colonialism, racism, and sexuality. de la tierra received an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Texas at El Paso and a...
In each issue of BUST, Amber Tamblyn reviews a book of poetry. From our April/May 2018 issue, here's her review of "Open Your Mouth Like a Bell" by Mindy Nettifee: There's a sharp art in wielding dark humor and tender reality, and the poems in Mindy Nettifee's new collection, Open Your Mouth Like a Bell (Write Bloody), pierce like pointed, poetic blades. "There are many doorways," begins the title poem. "The eating sadness donuts on a frozen river in Vermont/doorway./The ecstatic yes doorway./The psychedelic healing in a...
Corinna Bechko is the first woman to write an Earth One title with Green Lantern: Earth One Vol. 1. In 2010, DC Comics decided to release the Earth One series, a re-imagining of the origin stories of their most famous superheroes like Superman, Wonder Woman and Batman. Our Hal Jordan, AKA Green Lantern, has been re-imagined with a new origin story, and the primary person creating this male superhero is a woman — let that settle in for a moment. Goodbye toxic masculinity, so long...
The book review setion from our February/March 2018 issue is right here, bringing you feminist-friendly literature. Read them all here, and check out our spotlight on black feminist writers' memoirs here.  From Here To Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good DeathBy Caitlin Doughty(W.W. Norton & Company)We’re all going to die. But Caitlin Doughty wants us to start thinking about what happens after. In the follow-up to her 2014 memoir Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, the death-positive mortician makes it clear that end-of-life planning is...
The new anthology Go Home! — edited by Rowan Hisayo Buchanan, published by Feminist Press in collaboration with the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and out today — brings together writings by 24 different Asian diasporic writers. In the editor’s note, Rowan Hisayo Buchanan introduces the Japanese word “kaerimasu,” a verb meaning “traveling homeward.” She muses, “There is something so particular about a journey made toward home. The word has a beauty and a comfort to it. But what does it mean to go home?” Next, she...