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Books

From our June/July 2018 print issue, we're bringing you a sidebar on three new books about women fighting the good fight in the showbiz trenches. Hysterical!: Women in American Comedy Edited by Linda Mizejewski and Victoria Sturtevant(University of Texas Press)  Hysterical!: Women in American Comedy is here to meet all your funny female deep-read needs. While it’s an academic text chock full of thoughtful essays, this hefty volume is also a juicy read for those who love the many ways female comics use their art to question the patriarchy....
In 1740, French author Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve wrote and published a collection of stories entitled La Jeune Ameriquaine et les Contes Marins. Within was the fairy tale "La Belle et la Bête." Widely viewed as the oldest version of Beauty and Beast, "La Belle et la Bête" contained all of the now familiar elements of the much beloved story. There was a handsome prince cursed to live out his days as a monstrous beast and a courageous beauty who consents to be his prisoner...
This piece discusses depression and suicide.   The power to never die sounds like dream—unless you are a person dealing with depression and suicidal thoughts. The character Chrysalis in the comic series Eternity Girl is living just that scenario, and it's a nightmare for her. With pastel-bright colors and dark humor, comic creator Mags Visaggio brings to light two important issues that comics don’t always talk about: depression and suicide. These themes have been explored in just a few other comics, such as Tom King’s Mr. Miracle and Neil Gaiman’s...
Here at BUST, we receive many copies of children’s and young adult books that contain dozens of mini-profiles of incredible women. These books are important—as a baby feminist, I read and re-read the 1998 book Girls Who Rocked The World. But there are so many books like these that sometimes it’s hard for individual titles to stand out from the crowd. Illustrator and comic designer Pénélope Bagieu's book Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked The World does just that. Told in colorful comic strips, Brazen succeeds because...
“Our failures will help us grow. They forge us. Test us. Make us stronger.” This quote from Ethan Young’s comic The Battles Of Bridget Lee: Invasion Of Farfall is a good glimpse into what this comic is about. Set in a dystopian future where there is an intergalactic war happening, Bridget Lee, the comic's protagonist and namesake, must cope with being a doctor, a war veteran, and the protector of her community. It is the type of role we rarely ever see women portray in any medium of...
What I am about to write will be nothing shocking to people who menstruate: My period has been a pain in my behind since I was 11 years old and my uterine lining decided it had enough of its unshed purity. But it hasn’t been any ol’ annoyance—I have polycystic ovary syndrome, which means that my ovaries constantly feel like they are being pulverized to dust by the Hulk or the Thing or, hell, if I’m going to make references to sedimentary superheroes, maybe Dwayne...
Today, Jane Austen, Lord Byron, Charlotte Brontë, and Charles Dickens are generally recognized as four of the greatest authors in English literature.  But how did their contemporaries view them?  Were their works appreciated?  And how did the 19th century public feel when three of them, still in their prime, met an untimely end?  To discover the answers to these questions, one might delve into the legions of biographies written over the years or have a look at their letters, journals, or contemporary reviews of their...
No matter the topic at hand, author Michelle Tea’s writing oozes with memoir, as she injects her own experiences and perspective into any piece she’s working on. A collection of essays that originally appeared as articles, reviews, performances, speeches, and the like, Against Memoir (Feminist Press) explores the life and times of the author coming up in the Bay Area after escaping her dreary hometown of Chelsea, Massachusetts—though she tends to travel back in time during these essays every now and then. The book is a...
  Ashley Eckstein is an actual Disney princess, and has built a name for herself as a professional fangirl. Star Wars fans around the world know her as the voice of Anakin Skywalker’s padawan—a plucky Togruta teenager named Ahsoka Tano, later a rebel leader known as Fulcrum—in the animated TV series Star Wars: The Clone Wars and Star Wars Rebels. Legions of fan-femmes know the fashion line she created called Her Universe. Eckstein’s work is about ending the misconception that only boys get to be nerds...
As we get closer to BUST's 25th anniversary this July, we're bringing out of our favorite pieces from the archives. Julie Klausner interviewed Carrie Fisher in this piece, first published in our December/January 2012 issue.   She played Princess Leia in Star Wars, she’s the daughter of Hollywood legends Eddie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds, and she became a notoriously public figure after writing the thinly veiled tell-all novel Postcards from the Edge and the totally unveiled memoir Wishful Drinking. But somehow, in her new nonfiction book, Shockaholic,...