Quantcast
In 'Elsewhere, Home,' Characters Grapple With Homesickness, Love, And Assimilation

 

elsewherehome 6ab6d

Elsewhere, Home 
By Leila Aboulela
(Grove Press/Black Cat)

ADVERTISEMENT

Author Leila Aboulela takes readers from Khartoum, Sudan, to Aberdeen, Scotland, and back in Elsewhere, Home, a collection of 13 stories about belonging, human connection, and the complexities of leaving home. Though Aboulela’s subjects range in age and background, there’s a link: all of them grapple with homesickness, love, and assimilation. Aboulela addresses these themes through characters including Samra, a young woman who, while flying back to Khartoum, runs into an old classmate who once was a target of her ridicule; Dina, a biracial British student who develops feelings for a Muslim boy working at a kebab shop; and the unnamed housewife of the collection’s final story, who connects deeply with a famous writer, only to feel let down when they finally meet.

Though some stories are more memorable than others—particular standouts are “Pages of Fruit,” “The Museum,” and “Summer Maze,” while “Farida’s Eyes” falls short by comparison—Aboulela’s writing throughout is beautiful and full of easy dialogue and insight. Though she tackles many heavier, broader themes in her writing, Aboulela excels most at portraying the nuances of day-to-day life and the pains of missing—and returning—home. (4/5)

By Lydia Wang

The Hundred Wells of Salaga was released February 12, 2019.This article originally appeared in the March/April 2019 print edition of BUST MagazineSubscribe today!

Free Download:  Great Dames!

Get inspired by some of our favorite interviews, featuring Dolly Parton, Solange, Tina Fey, Jessica Williams, Kathleen Hanna, Laverne Cox, the Broad City gals, and more! Plus, keep up with the latest from BUST.

More from BUST

In "Florida," Lauren Groff Tackles Family And Fear

"Meanwhile, Elsewhere" Is A Stunning Collection Of Sci-Fi Short Stories By Trans Writers

"Unclean Jobs For Women And Girls" Is Weird And Wonderful

 

 

Support Feminist Media! During these troubling political times, independent feminist media is more vital than ever. If our bold, uncensored reporting on women’s issues is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $25, $50, or whatever you can afford, to protect and sustain BUST.com. Thanks so much—we can’t spell BUST without U.

SUPPORT FEMINIST MEDIA

If our bold, uncensored reporting on women's issues is important to you, please consider making a donation.

donate button