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11 New Books By Women Coming Out In August 2018

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August is here, and that means new books! Every week, I pick the best in feminist-friendly entertainment for our Week Of Women newsletter, including new book releases. This month, I decided to try separating the books into a post of their own. Here are 11 new releases this August, all by women, that we can’t wait to read. (When we’ve already reviewed them or have plans to, I’ll note it!)

Maeve in America: Essays by a Girl From Somewhere Else by Maeve Higgins (August 7, Penguin Books)

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This collection of essays by Irish-American comedian Maeve Higgins is “upbeat and funny” while also tackling serious topics ilke depression, writes BUST reviewer Brianne Kane. See BUST’s August/September 2018 issue for review.

Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company that Addicted America by Beth Macy (August 7, Little, Brown and Company)

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Journalist Beth Macy charts America’s 20-year opioid addiction crisis in this timely nonfiction book. 

 

If You Leave Me by Crystal Hana Kim (August 7, William Morrow)

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Crystal Hana Kim’s debut novel follows a pair of ill-fated lovers and their families, set during the Korean war.

You Have The Right To Remain Fat by Virgie Tovar (August 14, Feminist Press)

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Author and activist Virgie Tovar’s nonfiction book is “a manifesto for the fat revolution.” Read our review here. 

Severance by Ling Ma (August 14, Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

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Ling Ma’s debut novel is a brilliantly unsettling dystopian novel following a young woman who somehow escapes a fever epidemic and joins a cult-like group of fellow survivors. Read our review here.

A River Of Stars by Vanessa Hua (August 14, Ballantine Books)

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Vanessa Hua’s debut novel follows a young Chinese woman who becomes pregnant by her boss and is sent to the United States to give birth; it’s earned praise from Celeste Ng and Emma Cline.


Pretty Things by Virginie Despentes (August 15, Feminist Press)

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French novelist and filmmaker Virginie Despentes’ new novel follows a pair of twins—one homely and talented, one attractive but untalented—creating “an honest, gritty look into the line between owning one’s sexuality and being owned by it,” writes BUST reviewer Maggie Stamets. See BUST’s August/September 2018 issue for review.

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Vox by Christina Dalcher (August 21, Berkley)

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This dystopian novel is set in a world where women are only allowed to speak 100 words each day; it’s earned comparisons to the Handmaid’s Tale.

Gross Anatomy: Dispatches From The Front (And Back) by Mara Altman (August 21, G.P. Putnam's Sons)

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In this nonfiction book, writer Mara Altman examines body hair, cleavage, camel toe, and other much-maligned body parts. Stay tuned for review on BUST.com.

Praise Song for the Butterflies by Bernice L. McFadden (August 28, Akashic Books)

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Bernice L. McFadden’s tenth novel follows a West African woman’s recovery after she escapes the temple where she was forced into 15 years of ritual servitude.

 

Unapologetic: A Black, Queer, and Feminist Mandate for Radical Movements by Charlene A. Carruthers (August 28, Beacon Press)

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Activist and organizer Charlene A. Carruthers’s book is a framework for activists, sharing a needed vision for the fight for social justice.

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Erika W. Smith is BUST's digital editorial director. You can follow her on Twitter and Instagram @erikawynn and email her at erikawsmith@bust.com.

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