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Beyoncé continues to use her platform to be outspoken about racism and police brutality. On Thursday, she posted a powerful statement to her website denouncing the violence that black people have faced at the hands of police in the United States. Beyoncé speaks, we listen. “This is not a plea to all police officers but toward any human being who fails to value life. The war on people of color and all minorities needs to be over.” The statement ended with a call to action, urging...
I was impatiently waiting for the train home last night when I heard the news. I literally, and I mean literally, yelled in the silent station, “GODDESS BLESS!” The lone man near me on the platform raised his eyebrows, shook his head. I beamed. You would think I had just been asked to go on tour with Sleater-Kinney or maybe won a Pulitzer Prize for a work of fiction I haven’t even published yet. Nope. I had just read a headline on Twitter — “Aubrey...
Maria Ripoll has been a quiet but consistent presence in the film scene in Europe since the late 1990s, directing episodes of television, a documentary, and six feature films, two of which were produced with American or British casts. Ripoll was born in Barcelona, Spain, but came to the U.S. to study film at AFI in Los Angeles. In 1993, she made a short film, Kill Me Later, which won first prize at Oberhausen Film Festival and a Panavision grant from the Houston Film Festival. In...
My friend’s cousin recently got married and the husband was ecstatic to find that she was a virgin. Apparently, the cousin bled on her wedding night and received a hug from her husband, who hadn’t really thought much about his wife’s virginity, but felt great that she was one. Unintentionally, the cousin had passed the "agnipariksha equivalent," or the test of chastity of our times. After we were done gaping at the absurdity of the situation, considering my friend’s cousin will never find out if her husband was a virgin...
If you’re reading BUST, you probably already know that the Bechdel test asks whether a work of fiction 1) features at least two women 2) who talk to each other 3) about something other than a man. It is named for cartoonist Alison Bechdel, and it has sure inspired a lot of lists of films, particularly those that fail the test, but I’d like to look at works that pass it. Here’s a short list of YA novels to add to your reading list that both...