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Margaret Cho’s hilarious new Funny or Die video raises the question of what it would be like if women ran Hollywood. Cho depicts a network sitcom’s writing room, but with women only around the conference table. The fictional show is called “The DUFF and the DILF,” and the women are struggling with how to make Dan, the DILF, be more like “a human man,” since “52 percent of our audience is male or whatever,” as Cho says. The tables have turned.  They try to give him...
  Writer, musician, actress, and former BUST covergirl Carrie Brownstein is perhaps our favorite sentient being. And, as a sentient being, she understands you perfectly.  She understands you when you’re on your period:   And when you’re SO OVER some sexist bullshit about school dress codes, but also lookin’ bad as hell:   When it’s another beautiful day to smash the patriarchy:   When someone criticizes Beyonce:   When the new season of OITNB came out:   When Texas lawmakers continued to restrict women’s access to abortions:   When Hollywood is super sexist:   When someone says that they “don’t see...
We are constantly shown ads that are degrading to women in one way or another. You can’t really escape them- they’re on the subway, the bus, billboards, TV, magazines, etc. National Women’s Liberation has decided to take a cue from the ladies of yesteryear by using a sticker to make a statement. The sticker, created by Redstockings in 1969, reads, “This oppresses women.” Members of the group have been placing it on ads around New York City. Here’s some of their work: Via katyapowder on Instagram Via 4womenslib...
The first time I heard Nirvana, it was a hot summer day and I was en route to Home Depot with my dad. I was probably six or seven years old. The classic rock station played Nirvana’s “All Apologies” and my mind was blown. Something about it seemed magical; the repetition of “all in all is are we are” mesmerized me. That trip shaped who I am today. I’ve always been obsessed with music. My favorite childhood memories are dancing to my dad’s record collection in my...
As far as we’ve come with female superheroes in films, their portrayal continues to disappoint.  Hillary Pennell and Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz at the University of Missouri conducted a study recently that shows how even the new super-empowered heroes may lower women’s self esteem.  Pennell and Behm-Morawitz showed undergraduate women scenes from two popular superhero film series, Spider-Man and X-Men. The female characters shown from Spider-Man were all victims. The female characters shown from X-Men were heroines. However, females from both series were highly sexualized.  Women of X-Men Cindy May...