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Arts

Arts

Art, politics, and activism are certainly no strangers to one another, but the past few months have been particularly active with protests in New York City. This past February, artist Nan Goldin led a die-in at the Guggenheim Museum to protest the Sackler family's involvement with the museum. The Sackler family owns Purdue Pharma, the company that manufactures OxyContin, the controversial drug that has caused many fatal overdoses. Purdue Pharma has been accused of profiting from the opioid crisis by dishonestly marketing the drug and encouraging doctors...
Many of us know Sir Edwin Henry Landseer (7 March 1802 – 1 October 1873) as the sculptor of the four magnificent bronze lions that guard Nelson’s column in Trafalgar Square. During the mid-19th century, however, Landseer’s fame derived from his unrivalled talent as an animal painter.  A Distinguished Member of the Humane Society, 1838. by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer (Tate Collection, London) From the upper echelons of Victorian society to the working middle-class, there were few who were not familiar with Landseer’s work. He owed much...
What’s not to love about artist Lisa Congdon? Her bright, exuberant aesthetic is infused with a clear commitment to feminism and inclusion. “People need hope,” says Congdon, who relocated from San Francisco to Portland, OR, a few years back to be closer to family, and for a slower pace of life with her wife, Clay Walsh. Congdon’s body of work—including books like Art, Inc.: The Essential Guide to Building Your Career as an Artist, REI’s “Force of Nature” gender-equality campaign, and her celebrated “Protect the...
  Directed by female filmmaking trio Ivana Hucikova, Sarah Keeling, and Grace Remington, Into My Life celebrates the lives of two African-American women, Cassandra Bromfield and her late mother, M. Elaine – a school teacher and creatively gifted filmmaking enthusiast who captured their lives and their community living in Brooklyn’s largest affordable housing cooperative, Lindsay Park.   Centering around Bromfield’s life, the tender award-winning short documentary dives into her fond memories of growing up in the co-op, weaving in beautiful Super-8 footage that her mother had shot throughout the 60’s...
Imagine a crowd of young women wearing vividly-colored clothing with flowers in their hair, converging under a sea of signs and banners with bright, colorful images and slogans inspired by supermarket products— “Fresh Eggs,” “God Likes Canned Peaches”—waving under a bright blue sky. Acoustic guitars strum folk songs while people sing and dance along. Now, imagine that this celebration is also full of Catholic nuns in traditional habits, wearing flower garlands over their black-and-white wimples. The year is 1964, the occasion is “Mary’s Day,” the...
Are you going to SXSW this year? On March 15, from 7-10pm, Pussy Power House and Satellite Art Show are hosting Double Take, a BUST-sponsored interactive performance art dance party that you will not want to miss. The event will be in Austin, TX at the Museum of Human Achievement. There will be live music and dance performances by local artists from Austin and New Orleans, plus NOLA based DJ @rustylazer. The event is inclusive, and people of all gender identities are welcome. From neon fishnets...
The tradition of tattooing dates back thousands of years all across the globe, from Ötzi the 12,000 year old ice mummy found in the Alps whose skin shows the oldest tattoos on a specimen, to Ancient Egyptians using tattooing to heal various ailments. Tattooing is steeped in tradition and has an incredibly rich and diverse history. And there is just way too much of it to fit into one article, so today we’re going to focus on the women who transformed the art form at the start of...

  I was so thrilled to catch Leonor Fini: Theatre of Desire, 1930-1990 at the Museum of Sex here in NYC, as she is one of my favorite painters. Leonor was way ahead of her time, and was the OG feminist spitfire. Born in 1907 of Italian and Argentinian parents, she was mostly raised by her mother in Italy and was said to have loved visiting the morgue as a youth. Her work explores female sexuality, and she often painted androgynous men in the nude, where women were...
From the minute you walk into the theater, you realize this play is not just a show. This is a Gloria Steinem experience. The biographical play Gloria: A Life is currently playing in New York at the Daryl Roth Theatre, where the round staging seems to have been chosen specifically to reflect the talking circle that Gloria suggests as a way to equalize everyone. Every inch of the stage's floor is covered in persian rugs, and each individual seat is designated by a paisley velvet pillow....
Fashionable 19th century Parisian painter Auguste Toulmouche is best known for his depictions of richly clad women set against the backdrop of luxurious interiors. His paintings have been called “elegant trifles” and the ladies who feature in them have been referred to as “Toulmouche’s delicious dolls.” One critic even compared the interiors of a Toulmouche painting to daintily decorated jewel boxes. Unsurprisingly, the 19th century public had a great appetite for these visual treats. Toulmouche’s paintings were popular, both with the upper and middle classes,...