Although Marisha Pessi, author of the 2007 bestseller Special Topics in Calamity Physics, should be arrested for italics abuse, a crime against literature crazily splattered all over her second novel (and I am so not kidding), she’s spun such a gripping yarn that by the end, nearly 600 pages later, I had somehow forgiven the excessiveness. Night Film is a genre-bending page-turner melodramatically haunted by two absent characters, reclusive cult horror director Cordova and his daughter, Ashley, who jumped, fell, or was pushed down an elevator shaft. Read More
“The first time Andy met Louisa, she was covered in blood.” So begins The Explanation For Everything, the engrossing and sometimes frustrating third novel from Lauren Grodstein. The opening sentence is actually the beginning of a strangely adorable meet-cute in an emergency room, but by the end of the first chapter, Louisa is again covered in blood, killed in a drunk-driving accident, leaving Andy and their two young daughters behind. Read More
  Samantha Shannon’s debut novel (the first of a seven-part series) has already been compared to both Harry Potter and The Hunger Games, and this comparison is spot on. The Bone Season begins in underground London in the year 2059. Hundreds of years earlier, the fabric that separated the human world from the spirit world had been torn. Because of that, clairvoyance—the ability to connect with ghosts—has become prevalent across the globe. Read More
In her guide for women looking to gain political office, Rebecca Sive argues for the necessity of such a book by opening up with the noteworthy statistics that, “Women occupy fewer than 20 percent of the seats in the U.S. Congress. Only 5 of our 50 states have women governors. And though thousands of women hold local and state offices, those percentages are dismal as well. Read More
  Filmmaker Destin Daniel Cretton (I Am Not a Hipster) directs this SXSW Grand Jury Award-winning drama about staffers at a group foster home who are dealing with emotional troubles of their own. The feature centers on Grace (Brie Larson), who directs the facility, and her coworker-slash-adoring-lover Mason (John Gallagher, Jr.).    Grace does her job well—breaking up fights, inspecting rooms, nurturing relationships, and braiding hair. Her life at home, on the other hand, is fraught. Read More
Just in time for Women’s Equality Day on August 26, we've partnered with Open Road Media to give away a brand new Kobo Arc tablet stocked with classic works from some of the feistiest and most influential female writes of the past fifty years.  The giveaway includes one Kobo Arc tablet pre-loaded with the following ebooks: Fear of Flying by Erica Jong A literary sensation when first published in 1973, Fear of Flying established Erica Jong as one of her generation’s foremost voices on sex and feminism. Read More
  In a world where movie-trailer voiceovers are dominated by men, one woman has a dream—to become the first woman to ever utter the words “in a world” in a movie trailer. Lake Bell (Childrens Hospital), who also wrote and directed this comedy, stars as Carol, an underemployed vocal coach and aspiring voice actor whose father, Sam (Fred Melamed), is a superstar in the insular movie trailer industry. After Sam kicks Carol out of the house to make room for his girlfriend, she becomes a rising movie-trailer star in her own right—much to Sam’s annoyance. Read More
  When Jane (Keri Russell) finds herself in her mid-30s and at a coital dead-end, she spends her life savings on a trip to a resort in the English countryside that promises guests an immersive Jane Austen-style experience. Run by the money mongering Mrs. Wattlesbrook (Jane Seymour), “Austenland” provides Jane with more romantic intrigue than her beloved Pride and Prejudice. Read More
When shopping for shoes, we're typically attracted by appearance and, of course, price point. Human rights and sustainability don't enter the equation as much as they should. But that can change thanks to Nicora Johns, a spankin' new footwear company with both environmental and labor considerations driving its business. As a longtime cobbling connoisseur, 32-year-old founder Stephanie Fryslie decided to take matters into her own hands. Literally. Fryslie works alongside fellow shoemakers to create handcrafted footwear for her L.A.-based brand. Read More
I've had my share of intimate rendezvous with a not-to-be-named musician or two, but I didn't realize the intricacies of dating a rock star until I was actually in a committed relationship with one. The rock star relationship lifestyle ain't no walk in the park. Just ask the ladies of Rock of Love. Or don't... 1. They're not as cool as they seem.In fact, if you stripped away all their stage-cred and hype, they'd just be talented guitar nerds. And if you're actually in love with one, you adore them because they're not nearly as cool as people think they are. 2. Read More