Lynda Carter made television history when she played Wonder Woman from 1975-1979. Can such an iconic portrayal ever be lived up to? It will have to be, because word is out that David E. Kelley, creator of "The Practice", "Ally McBeal", and "Boston Legal", is on board with Warner Bros for the return of a Wonder Woman TV series. Little is known regarding details of the show, except that it might focus more on Wonder Woman's alter ego, Diana Prince, as a "single woman in a man's world", and that it might follow the style of "Smallville". One of the big questions is who is to play the superheroine. 

 

Wonder Woman's character originated in 1940 when William Moulton Marston, who worked for Detective Comics (now DC Comics), felt the world of comics was in dire need of a female role-model. Marston was involved in the creation of the systolic blood-pressure test, which led to the invention of the polygraph and, based on his knowledge of human tendencies, he felt women were more honest and reliable than men. He wanted to create a role model for young girls who was as strong as a superhero and also possessed all the feminine qualities he admired in women. The result was a new comic book series with a leading lady- our beloved Wonder Woman. 

 

In the 1970's, ABC created the TV series "The New Original Wonder Woman", which moved to CBS under the title "The New Adventures of Wonder Woman" shortly after, becoming the version Lynda Carter immortalized. The directors of the show are rumored to have been influenced by the writings of Gloria Steinem, who featured Wonder Woman as the first cover of Ms. Magazine, and the character was referred to in many feminist circles of the time. Marston's vision came to life in an entirely new way with the creation of the TV show, imprinting the image of Wonder Woman as a real person into the psyches of girls and women around the world. The show was incredibly successful and the superheroine became a television icon. Carter became associated with the character and found herself in the position of being a role model for young women everywhere. The costume, designed by Hollywood designer Donfeld, is still a popular Halloween option and whenever rumors arise about Wonder Woman getting a make-over, disapproval stirs among fans. 

 

We'll have to wait to see the new show to know if it lives up to, shames, or surpasses its predecessor, but in the meantime, we want to know...

 

...who do YOU think should play the new Wonder Woman? 

 

 

PHOTOS COURTESY of Lights and Warner Bros Records and DC Comics. 

 

Tagged in: wonder woman, William Moulton Marston, television icons, superheroines, Lynda Carter, dc comics, David E. Kelley   

The opinions expressed on the BUST blog are those of the authors themselves and do not necessarily reflect the position of BUST Magazine or its staff.


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