TV - BUST BUST is a magazine and website that provides news, entertainment, celebrity, lifestyle, and fashion from a feminist perspective. http://bust.com/tv/feed/atom/ 2018-01-21T15:14:38-05:00 BUST no-reply@bust.com Joomla! - Open Source Content Management Tracee Ellis Ross Makes Less Than Anthony Anderson On "Black-ish," And That's About To Change 2018-01-19T12:35:21-05:00 2018-01-19T12:35:21-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/194092-tracee-ellis-ross-salary.html Lydia Wang lydiawang@nyu.edu <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/37861/blackish_77b5b.jpg" alt="blackish 77b5b" class="blog-image" /></p> <p>On January 9, <em>All the Money in the World</em> made headlines when <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/people/2018/01/09/exclusive-wahlberg-paid-1-5-m-all-money-reshoot-williams-got-less-than-1-000/1018351001/"><em>USA Today</em> </a>reported Michelle Williams was paid under $1,000 during the film reshoot while her co-star Mark Wahlberg made — well — all the money in the world (or $1.5 million). Now,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/sharing-salaries-how-actresses-are-fighting-hollywoods-gender-pay-disparity-transparency-1075132"><em>the Hollywood Reporter</em> </a>is sharing that <em>Black-ish </em>star Tracee Ellis Ross is apparently earning “significantly less” than her onscreen husband Anthony Anderson.</p> <p>The award-winning show is currently undergoing negotiations for its fifth season. An unnamed source told <em>the&nbsp;</em><em>Hollywood&nbsp;</em><em>Reporter</em> that if Ellis Ross isn’t compensated equally, she may appear only as a guest role on <em>Black-ish</em> to make time for other projects. The news was discussed at a Time’s Up meeting following the Golden Globes.</p> <p>An ABC network source told <em>the Hollywood</em> <em>Reporter</em> that Ellis Ross will have an increased salary, and also noted that the difference could have less to do with gender and more to do with Anderson’s role as an executive producer.</p> <p>Still, though, it’s important that Ellis Ross makes a fair wage — especially given that she’s the only <em>Black-ish </em>actor who’s taken home a Golden Globe for her performance. In 2017, she won Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, making her the first black woman to win the award since 1982.</p> <p><em>Top photo via Black-ish / ABC</em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/194043-mark-wahlberg-was-paid-1-5-million-for-the-all-the-money-reshoot-while-michelle-williams-made-less-than-1-000.html">Mark Wahlberg Was Paid $1.5 Million For The "All The Money In The World" Reshoot While Michelle Williams Made Less Than $1,000</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/15422-tracee-ellis-ross-bust-interview.html">Tracee Ellis Ross Is 'A Woman Who Speaks Up For Herself': BUST Interview</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/feminism/193997-hollywood-women-unite-with-an-initiative-to-end-sexual-harassment-nationwide.html">Hundreds Of Hollywood Women Unite To Fight Sexual Harassment In ALL Industries</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/37861/blackish_77b5b.jpg" alt="blackish 77b5b" class="blog-image" /></p> <p>On January 9, <em>All the Money in the World</em> made headlines when <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/people/2018/01/09/exclusive-wahlberg-paid-1-5-m-all-money-reshoot-williams-got-less-than-1-000/1018351001/"><em>USA Today</em> </a>reported Michelle Williams was paid under $1,000 during the film reshoot while her co-star Mark Wahlberg made — well — all the money in the world (or $1.5 million). Now,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/sharing-salaries-how-actresses-are-fighting-hollywoods-gender-pay-disparity-transparency-1075132"><em>the Hollywood Reporter</em> </a>is sharing that <em>Black-ish </em>star Tracee Ellis Ross is apparently earning “significantly less” than her onscreen husband Anthony Anderson.</p> <p>The award-winning show is currently undergoing negotiations for its fifth season. An unnamed source told <em>the&nbsp;</em><em>Hollywood&nbsp;</em><em>Reporter</em> that if Ellis Ross isn’t compensated equally, she may appear only as a guest role on <em>Black-ish</em> to make time for other projects. The news was discussed at a Time’s Up meeting following the Golden Globes.</p> <p>An ABC network source told <em>the Hollywood</em> <em>Reporter</em> that Ellis Ross will have an increased salary, and also noted that the difference could have less to do with gender and more to do with Anderson’s role as an executive producer.</p> <p>Still, though, it’s important that Ellis Ross makes a fair wage — especially given that she’s the only <em>Black-ish </em>actor who’s taken home a Golden Globe for her performance. In 2017, she won Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, making her the first black woman to win the award since 1982.</p> <p><em>Top photo via Black-ish / ABC</em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/194043-mark-wahlberg-was-paid-1-5-million-for-the-all-the-money-reshoot-while-michelle-williams-made-less-than-1-000.html">Mark Wahlberg Was Paid $1.5 Million For The "All The Money In The World" Reshoot While Michelle Williams Made Less Than $1,000</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/15422-tracee-ellis-ross-bust-interview.html">Tracee Ellis Ross Is 'A Woman Who Speaks Up For Herself': BUST Interview</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/feminism/193997-hollywood-women-unite-with-an-initiative-to-end-sexual-harassment-nationwide.html">Hundreds Of Hollywood Women Unite To Fight Sexual Harassment In ALL Industries</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Samantha Bee Responds To Aziz Ansari And The #MeToo Backlash: "It Doesn't Have To Be Rape To Ruin Your Life" 2018-01-19T13:12:22-05:00 2018-01-19T13:12:22-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/194093-samantha-bee-explains-it-doesn-t-have-to-be-rape.html Cricket Epstein epstein.cs@gmail.com <p>&nbsp;<img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/aziz_5c88d.jpg" alt="aziz 5c88d" class="blog-image" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>On Wednesday, Samantha Bee unleashed a hilarious and poignant bit of full-frontal-feminist standup on her show, saying, “so now that we’re finally listening to women, some people are asking an important question: should we stop listening to women?” Her question references the backlash the #MeToo movement is receiving in response to the <a href="https://www.thecut.com/2018/01/moira-donegan-i-started-the-media-men-list.html">Shitty Media Men List </a>and the accusation against <a href="http://www.vulture.com/2018/01/aziz-ansari-accused-sexual-misconduct.html">Aziz Ansari</a>.</p> <p>A little context: In October, a woman, <a href="https://bust.com/feminism/194052-the-creator-of-the-shitty-media-men-list-i-still-don-t-know-what-kind-of-future-awaits-me-now-that-i-ve-stopped-hiding.html">who has since revealed herself to be Moira Donegan</a>, anonymously compiled a crowd-sourced list of men working in media who have assaulted, harassed, or raped women, or plagiarized their work. It was taken down just 12 hours after it began, but it gained widespread attention and was often treated it as if it was a hit list. Then, last week, an article was pubilshed on <a href="https://babe.net/2018/01/13/aziz-ansari-28355">Babe.net</a> accusing Aziz Ansari of sexual coercion. The media exploded, claiming that Ansari’s career shouldn't suffer just because Ansari and the woman had <a href="https://hellogiggles.com/news/no-what-happened-with-aziz-ansari-is-not-just-bad-sex/">“bad sex.”</a></p> <p>Now, actors, politicians, writers, and media personalities have declared that women are overreacting to innocent situations, voicing concern that the #MeToo movement is becoming a witch hunt, wherein a man can’t even speak to a woman for fear of having his life and career ruined.</p> <p>In the video, Bee reassures these men that they will not have their heads impaled on the spiked-gates surrounding the castle of misandry, pointing out that “what many fail to understand is that it doesn’t have to be rape to ruin your life, and it doesn’t have to ruin your life to be worth speaking out about. Any type of sexual harassment or coercion is unacceptable.” She then asks if women can’t collectively strategize about the ways that they are forced, on a daily basis, in almost all workplaces, and on the majority of dates, to endure men’s subtle and unsubtle aggression, “What the fuck are women supposed to do to protect ourselves?”&nbsp;</p> <p>Part of changing the higher standards around sex also means teaching men how to respect women, and to become better allies: “People like me had to wade through a sea of prehensile dicks to build the world we now enjoy, and part of enjoying that world is setting a higher standard for sex than just ‘not rape,’ and women get to talk about it if men don’t live up to those standards, especially if a man wrote a book&nbsp;<a href="https://www.amazon.com/Modern-Romance-Aziz-Ansari/dp/0143109251?ascsubtag=%5B%5Dvu%5Bp%5Dcjckmpd7h008dt8yejzdar3xq%5Bi%5Dlo2eKe%5Bz%5Dm%5Bd%5DD&tag=vulture-20">about how to sex good</a>.”</p> <p>In a final direct jab at Ansari, who, in an ironic display of fake allyship wore a #TIME’SUP pin to the Golden Globes, Bee says, “men, if you say you’re a feminist, then fuck like a feminist. If you don’t want to do that, take off your fucking pin because we are not your accessories.”</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/II-OP6vdMs8" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><span id="_mce_caret" data-mce-bogus="true"><em>top photo: Full Frontal with Samantha Bee</em></span></p> <p><strong style="font-size: 1rem;">More from BUST</strong><em></em></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/feminism/194067-aziz-ansari.html" style="font-size: 1rem;">On Aziz Ansari And "Bad Sex"</a></p> <p><a href="https://bust.com/feminism/194052-the-creator-of-the-shitty-media-men-list-i-still-don-t-know-what-kind-of-future-awaits-me-now-that-i-ve-stopped-hiding.html">he Creator Of The “Shitty Media Men” List Reveals Her Identity In A Powerful Essay</a></p> <p><a href="https://bust.com/feminism/193703-an-incomplete-and-constantly-expanding-list-of-famous-men-accused-of-sexual-harassment-in-the-past-month.html">An Incomplete (And Constantly Expanding) List Of Powerful Men Accused Of Sexual Harassment And Assault Since Harvey Weinstein</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;<img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/aziz_5c88d.jpg" alt="aziz 5c88d" class="blog-image" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>On Wednesday, Samantha Bee unleashed a hilarious and poignant bit of full-frontal-feminist standup on her show, saying, “so now that we’re finally listening to women, some people are asking an important question: should we stop listening to women?” Her question references the backlash the #MeToo movement is receiving in response to the <a href="https://www.thecut.com/2018/01/moira-donegan-i-started-the-media-men-list.html">Shitty Media Men List </a>and the accusation against <a href="http://www.vulture.com/2018/01/aziz-ansari-accused-sexual-misconduct.html">Aziz Ansari</a>.</p> <p>A little context: In October, a woman, <a href="https://bust.com/feminism/194052-the-creator-of-the-shitty-media-men-list-i-still-don-t-know-what-kind-of-future-awaits-me-now-that-i-ve-stopped-hiding.html">who has since revealed herself to be Moira Donegan</a>, anonymously compiled a crowd-sourced list of men working in media who have assaulted, harassed, or raped women, or plagiarized their work. It was taken down just 12 hours after it began, but it gained widespread attention and was often treated it as if it was a hit list. Then, last week, an article was pubilshed on <a href="https://babe.net/2018/01/13/aziz-ansari-28355">Babe.net</a> accusing Aziz Ansari of sexual coercion. The media exploded, claiming that Ansari’s career shouldn't suffer just because Ansari and the woman had <a href="https://hellogiggles.com/news/no-what-happened-with-aziz-ansari-is-not-just-bad-sex/">“bad sex.”</a></p> <p>Now, actors, politicians, writers, and media personalities have declared that women are overreacting to innocent situations, voicing concern that the #MeToo movement is becoming a witch hunt, wherein a man can’t even speak to a woman for fear of having his life and career ruined.</p> <p>In the video, Bee reassures these men that they will not have their heads impaled on the spiked-gates surrounding the castle of misandry, pointing out that “what many fail to understand is that it doesn’t have to be rape to ruin your life, and it doesn’t have to ruin your life to be worth speaking out about. Any type of sexual harassment or coercion is unacceptable.” She then asks if women can’t collectively strategize about the ways that they are forced, on a daily basis, in almost all workplaces, and on the majority of dates, to endure men’s subtle and unsubtle aggression, “What the fuck are women supposed to do to protect ourselves?”&nbsp;</p> <p>Part of changing the higher standards around sex also means teaching men how to respect women, and to become better allies: “People like me had to wade through a sea of prehensile dicks to build the world we now enjoy, and part of enjoying that world is setting a higher standard for sex than just ‘not rape,’ and women get to talk about it if men don’t live up to those standards, especially if a man wrote a book&nbsp;<a href="https://www.amazon.com/Modern-Romance-Aziz-Ansari/dp/0143109251?ascsubtag=%5B%5Dvu%5Bp%5Dcjckmpd7h008dt8yejzdar3xq%5Bi%5Dlo2eKe%5Bz%5Dm%5Bd%5DD&tag=vulture-20">about how to sex good</a>.”</p> <p>In a final direct jab at Ansari, who, in an ironic display of fake allyship wore a #TIME’SUP pin to the Golden Globes, Bee says, “men, if you say you’re a feminist, then fuck like a feminist. If you don’t want to do that, take off your fucking pin because we are not your accessories.”</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/II-OP6vdMs8" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><span id="_mce_caret" data-mce-bogus="true"><em>top photo: Full Frontal with Samantha Bee</em></span></p> <p><strong style="font-size: 1rem;">More from BUST</strong><em></em></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/feminism/194067-aziz-ansari.html" style="font-size: 1rem;">On Aziz Ansari And "Bad Sex"</a></p> <p><a href="https://bust.com/feminism/194052-the-creator-of-the-shitty-media-men-list-i-still-don-t-know-what-kind-of-future-awaits-me-now-that-i-ve-stopped-hiding.html">he Creator Of The “Shitty Media Men” List Reveals Her Identity In A Powerful Essay</a></p> <p><a href="https://bust.com/feminism/193703-an-incomplete-and-constantly-expanding-list-of-famous-men-accused-of-sexual-harassment-in-the-past-month.html">An Incomplete (And Constantly Expanding) List Of Powerful Men Accused Of Sexual Harassment And Assault Since Harvey Weinstein</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> 9 Moments To Pay Attention To From The 2018 Golden Globes 2018-01-08T13:01:13-05:00 2018-01-08T13:01:13-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/194026-golden-globes-2018.html Erika W. Smith erikawsmith@bust.com <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1rem;">&nbsp;<img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/oprah_826b1.jpg" alt="oprah 826b1" class="blog-image" /></span></p> <p>Last night, the Golden Globes were held — and were especially notable because this was the first awards ceremony since the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement started. And Hollywood acknowledged the moment in a big way — or at least, the women did. Almost every celebrity woman — and eight activists, including #MeToo creator Tarana Burke, who attended as celebrity women's plus-ones —&nbsp;wore black and spoke out against sexual harassment on the red carpet. But men, with a few exceptions, did not speak out (in interviews or in speeches) about the culture of sexual harassment and assault in their industry.</p> <p>The wins were varied, too.&nbsp;<em>Lady Bird</em> took home Best Motion Picture: Comedy, but Greta Gerwig didn't even get a nomination for Best Director. Several accused abusers, including Gary Oldman and Kirk Douglas, were honored. Many pointed out the hypocrisy of those who chose to wear #TimesUp pins while continuing to work with accused abusers (looking at you, Justin Timberlake) and/or not donating to the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund.</p> <p>Read on to see nine moments to pay attention to from the 2018 Golden Globes.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>1. Almost everyone wore black on the red carpet.</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p><span class=" wf_caption" style="max-width: 640px; width: 100%; display: block;"><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/timesup_73067.jpg" alt="timesup 73067" class="blog-image" style="width: 100%;" width="640" /><span style="display: block;">via Instagram/@<a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bdq-_hkgNYD/?taken-by=timesupnow">TimesUpNow</a></span></span>&nbsp;</p> <p>As had been rumored, almost everyone who attended the Golden Globes wore black — and it wasn’t an empty statement, as <a href="https://bust.com/style/193975-wearing-black-golden-globes.html">we had worried it might be</a>. Eight celebrity women brought activists as their plus-ones, and many others spoke out about sexual harassment and assault in red carpet interviews — even when they weren’t directly asked about it. Many also pointed out, correctly, that Hollywood isn’t the only industry fighting rape culture. Additionally, the <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/timesup">Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund</a>, which supports those in every industry who are affected by sexual harassment and assault, has now raised over $16 million — in just 19 days.</p> <p>On the other hand, many people correctly pointed out that it was overwhelmingly women speaking out against sexual harassment and assault, while, with a few exceptions, <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2018/01/what-the-men-didnt-say/549914/">men stayed silent</a> — and that quite a few celebrities of all genders wore #TimeUp pins but didn’t renounce their support of accused abusers like <a href="http://beta.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-farrow-woody-allen-me-too-20171207-story.html">Woody Allen</a> and <a href="https://nypost.com/2017/10/05/why-does-hollywood-keep-defending-roman-polanski/">Roman Polanski</a>.&nbsp;Wearing black at the Golden Globes was not an empty statement — again, over <em><strong>$16 million</strong></em> has been raised to help people fighting sexual assault in all industries — but there is still a lot of work to do.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong><span style="font-size: 1rem;">&nbsp;2.&nbsp;</span>Activists were honored and celebrated.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/diE-E977JcY" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/07/movies/golden-globes-2018-activists-metoo-red-carpet.html">Eight activists </a>attended as celebrity women’s plus-ones: #MeToo creator and <a href="http://www.ggenyc.org/">Girls For Gender Equity</a> founder Tarana Burke, <a href="https://www.domesticworkers.org/">National Domestic Workers Alliance</a> director Ai-jen Poo, workplace <a href="http://rocunited.org/">justice advocate for restaurant workers</a> Saru Jayaraman, <a href="https://www.imkaan.org.uk/">Imkaan </a>(a UK-based organization that fights violence against black and minority women) executive director Marai Larasi, journalist and community organizer <a href="http://rosaclemente.net/">Rosa Clemente</a>, <a href="https://www.alianzanacionaldecampesinas.org/">farmworkers advocate</a> Mónica Ramírez, Native American <a href="https://hellogiggles.com/awards-events/red-carpet/golden-globes/shailene-woodley-calina-lawrence-golden-globes/">treaty and water rights activist</a> Calina Lawrence, and women’s and LGBTQ rights activist<a href="http://people.com/movies/golden-globes-2018-emma-stone-brings-billie-jean-king/"> Billie Jean King</a>. In many cases, the celebrity women expertly pivoted their answers to interview questions into opportunities to celebrate the activists, who then spoke powerfully about their work (as above).<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>3. Debra Messing and others called out E! News for their gender pay gap.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UoVXIYPT-zA" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p>Last month, longtime host Catt Sadler <a href="http://people.com/tv/catt-sadler-leaves-e-news-pay-gap-cohost-jason-kennedy/">publicly left E! News</a> after she discovered her male counterpart was making more than twice her salary. Several celebrities <a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/debra-messing-brings-up-catt-sadler-e-news-salary-dispute-red-carpet-preshow-1071770">called this out during their E! red carpet interviews</a>. Debra Messing was the most blunt, saying, “I was so shocked to hear that E! doesn't believe in paying their female co-hosts the same as their male co-hosts. I miss Catt Sadler, and so we stand with her.” Laura Dern, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Eva Longoria also brought up E!’s wage gap in their E! interviews.<span style="font-size: 1rem;">&nbsp;<br /><br /></span></p> <p><strong>4. The women of <em>Big Little Lies</em> used their speeches to send a message.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zElCCihuotg" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><strong><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/geCIXy7nvFY" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe><br /></strong><br />Many women used their acceptance speeches to share an activist message, but perhaps the most powerful came from the women of <em>Big Little Lies</em>. Nicole Kidman, who won the Best Lead Actress in a Miniseries award for playing a woman who leaves an abusive relationship, said that her character “represents something that is the center of our conversation right now — abuse. I do believe and I hope we can elicit change through the stories we tell and the way we tell them.” Laura Dern, who won the Best Supporting Actress in a Miniseries award, called for everyone “to not only support survivors and bystanders who are brave enough to tell their truth but, to promote restorative justice, may we also please protect and employ them."<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>5. Oprah’s speech was EVERYTHING.<br /><br /><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fN5HV79_8B8?t=34s" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe><br /></strong></p> <p><br />The most powerful speech of the night went, hands-down, to Oprah. In her speech accepting the Cecil B. de Mille Award (becoming the first black woman to win this award), Oprah talked about the importance of representation and the life and legacy of <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/29/obituaries/recy-taylor-alabama-rape-victim-dead.html">Recy Taylor</a>, a black sharecropper who was raped by six white men in 1944 when she was 24 years old, and whose pursuit of justice — helped along by Rosa Parks — was a catalyst in the Civil Rights movement. “She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men,” Oprah said of Taylor. “For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up.”&nbsp; You definitely want to watch her speech, above.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>6. Women-centered entertainment won big…</strong></p> <p><strong><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wemgNnsncZ8" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></strong><br /><br />Several women-led TV series took home multiple awards — <em>Big Little Lies, the Marvelous Mrs. Maisel</em>, and <em>The Handmaid’s Tale</em>. On the movie side, <em>Lady Bird</em> won Best Motion Picture: Musical Or Comedy and <em>Lady Bird</em> star Saoirse Ronan won Best Actress In A Motion Picture: Musical Or Comedy.Allison Janney won Best Supporting Actress In A Motion Picture: Musical Or Comedy for her performance in&nbsp;<em style="font-weight: 400;">I, Tonya.</em><br /><br /></p> <p><strong>7. But no women were nominated for Best Director — as Natalie Portman pointed out.</strong></p> <p><strong><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uGyv9RyZSCY" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></strong><br /><br />Following Oprah’s speech, Natalie Portman introduced the nominees for Best Director with “And here are the <em>all-male</em> nominees….” In fact, the only woman to be honored for a non-acting award was Amy Sherman-Palladino, creator of <em>Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, </em>which won Best TV Series: Musical Or Comedy.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>8. And very few people of color — and no women of color, besides Oprah —&nbsp; took home awards.<br /><br /><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5Q9-FoE3dc0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe><br /></strong></p> <p>This year’s Golden Globes winners were overwhelmingly white — <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2018/01/08/as-golden-globes-pivot-to-metoo-diversity-issues-linger/?utm_term=.d25d53921e78">only two people of color won awards</a>, three if you count Oprah. The two awards went to Sterling K. Brown and Aziz Ansari, for Best Actor In A TV Series: Drama and Comedy, respectively. With these wins, <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/sterling-brown-makes-golden-globes-history-black-actor/story?id=52200102">Brown became the first black man to win in this category, ever</a>, and Aziz Ansari became <a href="https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/aziz-ansari-win_us_5a536b2de4b003133eca366b">the first Asian-American to win a Best Actor award in a TV category</a>, ever. The snubbing of <em>Get Out, Insecure,&nbsp;</em>and other media created by and centering people of color&nbsp;particularly stung because <em>Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri</em>&nbsp;— which has <a href="https://psmag.com/social-justice/three-billboards-bad-on-race">a highly-criticized storyline</a> about the redemption of a violent, racist cop — took home four major awards, including Best Motion Picture: Drama.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>9. Accused abusers won awards — and people noticed.</strong></p> <p><span class=" wf_caption" style="max-width: 528px; width: 100%; display: block;"><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/allysheedy_97175.jpg" alt="allysheedy 97175" class="blog-image" style="width: 100%;" width="528" /><span style="display: block;">via Twitter/@allysheedy</span></span></p> <p>People on social media were quick to share past sexual harassment, assault, or abuse allegations against award winners <a href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/gary-oldman-the-oscar-frontrunner-with-a-dark-past">Gary Oldman</a> and <a href="http://gawker.com/james-franco-tried-to-hook-up-with-a-17-year-old-on-ins-1557491436">James Franco</a>, nominees&nbsp;<a href="http://people.com/celebrity/christian-slater-arrested-on-sex-abuse-charge/" style="font-weight: 400;">Christian Slater</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-184621/Jude-Sadie-bust-up.html" style="font-weight: 400;">Jude Law</a>,&nbsp;presenter <a href="http://gawker.com/5893793/did-robert-downey-jr-really-just-accuse-kirk-douglas-of-a-brutal-rape">Kirk Douglas</a>, red carpet interviewer<a href="http://www.tvguide.com/news/ryan-seacrest-sexual-harassment-accusations/"> Ryan Seacrest,</a> and guest&nbsp;<a href="https://radaronline.com/exclusives/2014/06/justin-timberlake-sexual-harassment-allegations-settlement/">Justin Timberlake</a>.&nbsp;&nbsp;Several women shared&nbsp;<a href="http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2018/01/08/james-francos-golden-globes-win-ignites-outrage-prompts-two-actresses-to-accuse-actor-sexual-harassment.html">new allegations against James Franco</a> following his Best Actor in a Motion Picture: Comedy win. It’s disheartening to see accused abusers wear #TimesUp pins and accept awards — but it’s encouraging to see so many notice this hypocrisy and call for justice.</p> <p><em>top photo: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fN5HV79_8B8&feature=youtu.be">NBC/YouTube</a></em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/movies/193921-women-director-snubs-golden-globes.html">13 Women Directors Who Should Have Been Nominated For The Golden Globes</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/18841-golden-globes-2017.html">11 Moments We're Talking About From The 2017 Golden Globes</a></p> <p><a href="https://bust.com/style/193975-wearing-black-golden-globes.html">Why Just Wearing Black To The Golden Globes Isn't Enough<br /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1rem;">&nbsp;<img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/oprah_826b1.jpg" alt="oprah 826b1" class="blog-image" /></span></p> <p>Last night, the Golden Globes were held — and were especially notable because this was the first awards ceremony since the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement started. And Hollywood acknowledged the moment in a big way — or at least, the women did. Almost every celebrity woman — and eight activists, including #MeToo creator Tarana Burke, who attended as celebrity women's plus-ones —&nbsp;wore black and spoke out against sexual harassment on the red carpet. But men, with a few exceptions, did not speak out (in interviews or in speeches) about the culture of sexual harassment and assault in their industry.</p> <p>The wins were varied, too.&nbsp;<em>Lady Bird</em> took home Best Motion Picture: Comedy, but Greta Gerwig didn't even get a nomination for Best Director. Several accused abusers, including Gary Oldman and Kirk Douglas, were honored. Many pointed out the hypocrisy of those who chose to wear #TimesUp pins while continuing to work with accused abusers (looking at you, Justin Timberlake) and/or not donating to the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund.</p> <p>Read on to see nine moments to pay attention to from the 2018 Golden Globes.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>1. Almost everyone wore black on the red carpet.</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p><span class=" wf_caption" style="max-width: 640px; width: 100%; display: block;"><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/timesup_73067.jpg" alt="timesup 73067" class="blog-image" style="width: 100%;" width="640" /><span style="display: block;">via Instagram/@<a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bdq-_hkgNYD/?taken-by=timesupnow">TimesUpNow</a></span></span>&nbsp;</p> <p>As had been rumored, almost everyone who attended the Golden Globes wore black — and it wasn’t an empty statement, as <a href="https://bust.com/style/193975-wearing-black-golden-globes.html">we had worried it might be</a>. Eight celebrity women brought activists as their plus-ones, and many others spoke out about sexual harassment and assault in red carpet interviews — even when they weren’t directly asked about it. Many also pointed out, correctly, that Hollywood isn’t the only industry fighting rape culture. Additionally, the <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/timesup">Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund</a>, which supports those in every industry who are affected by sexual harassment and assault, has now raised over $16 million — in just 19 days.</p> <p>On the other hand, many people correctly pointed out that it was overwhelmingly women speaking out against sexual harassment and assault, while, with a few exceptions, <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2018/01/what-the-men-didnt-say/549914/">men stayed silent</a> — and that quite a few celebrities of all genders wore #TimeUp pins but didn’t renounce their support of accused abusers like <a href="http://beta.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-farrow-woody-allen-me-too-20171207-story.html">Woody Allen</a> and <a href="https://nypost.com/2017/10/05/why-does-hollywood-keep-defending-roman-polanski/">Roman Polanski</a>.&nbsp;Wearing black at the Golden Globes was not an empty statement — again, over <em><strong>$16 million</strong></em> has been raised to help people fighting sexual assault in all industries — but there is still a lot of work to do.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong><span style="font-size: 1rem;">&nbsp;2.&nbsp;</span>Activists were honored and celebrated.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/diE-E977JcY" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/07/movies/golden-globes-2018-activists-metoo-red-carpet.html">Eight activists </a>attended as celebrity women’s plus-ones: #MeToo creator and <a href="http://www.ggenyc.org/">Girls For Gender Equity</a> founder Tarana Burke, <a href="https://www.domesticworkers.org/">National Domestic Workers Alliance</a> director Ai-jen Poo, workplace <a href="http://rocunited.org/">justice advocate for restaurant workers</a> Saru Jayaraman, <a href="https://www.imkaan.org.uk/">Imkaan </a>(a UK-based organization that fights violence against black and minority women) executive director Marai Larasi, journalist and community organizer <a href="http://rosaclemente.net/">Rosa Clemente</a>, <a href="https://www.alianzanacionaldecampesinas.org/">farmworkers advocate</a> Mónica Ramírez, Native American <a href="https://hellogiggles.com/awards-events/red-carpet/golden-globes/shailene-woodley-calina-lawrence-golden-globes/">treaty and water rights activist</a> Calina Lawrence, and women’s and LGBTQ rights activist<a href="http://people.com/movies/golden-globes-2018-emma-stone-brings-billie-jean-king/"> Billie Jean King</a>. In many cases, the celebrity women expertly pivoted their answers to interview questions into opportunities to celebrate the activists, who then spoke powerfully about their work (as above).<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>3. Debra Messing and others called out E! News for their gender pay gap.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UoVXIYPT-zA" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p>Last month, longtime host Catt Sadler <a href="http://people.com/tv/catt-sadler-leaves-e-news-pay-gap-cohost-jason-kennedy/">publicly left E! News</a> after she discovered her male counterpart was making more than twice her salary. Several celebrities <a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/debra-messing-brings-up-catt-sadler-e-news-salary-dispute-red-carpet-preshow-1071770">called this out during their E! red carpet interviews</a>. Debra Messing was the most blunt, saying, “I was so shocked to hear that E! doesn't believe in paying their female co-hosts the same as their male co-hosts. I miss Catt Sadler, and so we stand with her.” Laura Dern, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Eva Longoria also brought up E!’s wage gap in their E! interviews.<span style="font-size: 1rem;">&nbsp;<br /><br /></span></p> <p><strong>4. The women of <em>Big Little Lies</em> used their speeches to send a message.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zElCCihuotg" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><strong><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/geCIXy7nvFY" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe><br /></strong><br />Many women used their acceptance speeches to share an activist message, but perhaps the most powerful came from the women of <em>Big Little Lies</em>. Nicole Kidman, who won the Best Lead Actress in a Miniseries award for playing a woman who leaves an abusive relationship, said that her character “represents something that is the center of our conversation right now — abuse. I do believe and I hope we can elicit change through the stories we tell and the way we tell them.” Laura Dern, who won the Best Supporting Actress in a Miniseries award, called for everyone “to not only support survivors and bystanders who are brave enough to tell their truth but, to promote restorative justice, may we also please protect and employ them."<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>5. Oprah’s speech was EVERYTHING.<br /><br /><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fN5HV79_8B8?t=34s" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe><br /></strong></p> <p><br />The most powerful speech of the night went, hands-down, to Oprah. In her speech accepting the Cecil B. de Mille Award (becoming the first black woman to win this award), Oprah talked about the importance of representation and the life and legacy of <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/29/obituaries/recy-taylor-alabama-rape-victim-dead.html">Recy Taylor</a>, a black sharecropper who was raped by six white men in 1944 when she was 24 years old, and whose pursuit of justice — helped along by Rosa Parks — was a catalyst in the Civil Rights movement. “She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men,” Oprah said of Taylor. “For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up.”&nbsp; You definitely want to watch her speech, above.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>6. Women-centered entertainment won big…</strong></p> <p><strong><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wemgNnsncZ8" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></strong><br /><br />Several women-led TV series took home multiple awards — <em>Big Little Lies, the Marvelous Mrs. Maisel</em>, and <em>The Handmaid’s Tale</em>. On the movie side, <em>Lady Bird</em> won Best Motion Picture: Musical Or Comedy and <em>Lady Bird</em> star Saoirse Ronan won Best Actress In A Motion Picture: Musical Or Comedy.Allison Janney won Best Supporting Actress In A Motion Picture: Musical Or Comedy for her performance in&nbsp;<em style="font-weight: 400;">I, Tonya.</em><br /><br /></p> <p><strong>7. But no women were nominated for Best Director — as Natalie Portman pointed out.</strong></p> <p><strong><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uGyv9RyZSCY" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></strong><br /><br />Following Oprah’s speech, Natalie Portman introduced the nominees for Best Director with “And here are the <em>all-male</em> nominees….” In fact, the only woman to be honored for a non-acting award was Amy Sherman-Palladino, creator of <em>Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, </em>which won Best TV Series: Musical Or Comedy.<br /><br /></p> <p><strong>8. And very few people of color — and no women of color, besides Oprah —&nbsp; took home awards.<br /><br /><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5Q9-FoE3dc0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe><br /></strong></p> <p>This year’s Golden Globes winners were overwhelmingly white — <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2018/01/08/as-golden-globes-pivot-to-metoo-diversity-issues-linger/?utm_term=.d25d53921e78">only two people of color won awards</a>, three if you count Oprah. The two awards went to Sterling K. Brown and Aziz Ansari, for Best Actor In A TV Series: Drama and Comedy, respectively. With these wins, <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/sterling-brown-makes-golden-globes-history-black-actor/story?id=52200102">Brown became the first black man to win in this category, ever</a>, and Aziz Ansari became <a href="https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/aziz-ansari-win_us_5a536b2de4b003133eca366b">the first Asian-American to win a Best Actor award in a TV category</a>, ever. The snubbing of <em>Get Out, Insecure,&nbsp;</em>and other media created by and centering people of color&nbsp;particularly stung because <em>Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri</em>&nbsp;— which has <a href="https://psmag.com/social-justice/three-billboards-bad-on-race">a highly-criticized storyline</a> about the redemption of a violent, racist cop — took home four major awards, including Best Motion Picture: Drama.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>9. Accused abusers won awards — and people noticed.</strong></p> <p><span class=" wf_caption" style="max-width: 528px; width: 100%; display: block;"><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/allysheedy_97175.jpg" alt="allysheedy 97175" class="blog-image" style="width: 100%;" width="528" /><span style="display: block;">via Twitter/@allysheedy</span></span></p> <p>People on social media were quick to share past sexual harassment, assault, or abuse allegations against award winners <a href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/gary-oldman-the-oscar-frontrunner-with-a-dark-past">Gary Oldman</a> and <a href="http://gawker.com/james-franco-tried-to-hook-up-with-a-17-year-old-on-ins-1557491436">James Franco</a>, nominees&nbsp;<a href="http://people.com/celebrity/christian-slater-arrested-on-sex-abuse-charge/" style="font-weight: 400;">Christian Slater</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-184621/Jude-Sadie-bust-up.html" style="font-weight: 400;">Jude Law</a>,&nbsp;presenter <a href="http://gawker.com/5893793/did-robert-downey-jr-really-just-accuse-kirk-douglas-of-a-brutal-rape">Kirk Douglas</a>, red carpet interviewer<a href="http://www.tvguide.com/news/ryan-seacrest-sexual-harassment-accusations/"> Ryan Seacrest,</a> and guest&nbsp;<a href="https://radaronline.com/exclusives/2014/06/justin-timberlake-sexual-harassment-allegations-settlement/">Justin Timberlake</a>.&nbsp;&nbsp;Several women shared&nbsp;<a href="http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2018/01/08/james-francos-golden-globes-win-ignites-outrage-prompts-two-actresses-to-accuse-actor-sexual-harassment.html">new allegations against James Franco</a> following his Best Actor in a Motion Picture: Comedy win. It’s disheartening to see accused abusers wear #TimesUp pins and accept awards — but it’s encouraging to see so many notice this hypocrisy and call for justice.</p> <p><em>top photo: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fN5HV79_8B8&feature=youtu.be">NBC/YouTube</a></em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/movies/193921-women-director-snubs-golden-globes.html">13 Women Directors Who Should Have Been Nominated For The Golden Globes</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/18841-golden-globes-2017.html">11 Moments We're Talking About From The 2017 Golden Globes</a></p> <p><a href="https://bust.com/style/193975-wearing-black-golden-globes.html">Why Just Wearing Black To The Golden Globes Isn't Enough<br /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Helena Bonham Carter Is Probably Going To Play Princess Margaret In “The Crown,” In Case You Needed Some Good News Today 2018-01-05T12:08:37-05:00 2018-01-05T12:08:37-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/194020-helena-bonham-carter-princess-margaret.html Erika W. Smith erikawsmith@bust.com <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1rem;"><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/hbc_258fb.jpg" alt="hbc 258fb" class="blog-image" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p>There’s a lot to love about Netflix’s <em>The Crown</em> — gorgeous costumes, Claire Foy’s angry-yet-composed face, storylines that sends you straight to Wikipedia to find out what actually happened — but perhaps the best thing about <em>The Crown</em> is the character of Princess Margaret, played in the first and second seasons by Vanessa Kirby as a glamorous, snarky, constantly-smoking socialite with perfect eyeliner and incredibly bad luck with men.</p> <p><img src="https://media.vanityfair.com/photos/5872f08f90495e865d8eb7d6/master/w_690,c_limit/margaret.gif" alt="margaret" class="blog-image" /></p> <p>Netflix previously announced that <em>the Crown</em> will be changing actors for its third season — which makes sense. Season 1 took place from 1947 to 1956, and Season 2 took place from 1956 to 1963, meaning that 33-year-old Claire Foy played Queen Elizabeth II from age 21 to age 37. Actress Olivia Colman — who I looooved in <em>Peep Show</em> and who has been in many other movies and TV series including&nbsp;<em>Broadchurch, The Lobster, </em>and<em> Hot Fuzz</em>&nbsp;— has been confirmed to take over as Queen Elizabeth II in the next decade or so of her life.</p> <p>Now,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.standard.co.uk/news/londoners-diary/londoners-diary-bonham-carter-gets-her-tiara-in-the-next-crown-a3732761.html"><em>the London Evening Standard</em></a> reports that Helena Bonham Carter “is all but confirmed to play the inimitable royal" Princess Margaret, adding that Carter was originally in the running to play Queen Elizabeth II before the role went to Coleman. HBC previously played Elizabeth and Margaret’s mom in <em>the King’s Speech</em> (and so did Olivia Coleman, in <em>Hyde Park on Hudson</em>).</p> <p>Even better: It looks like Season 3 will contain a particularly juicy storyline for Princess Margaret. <a href="http://www.digitalspy.com/tv/downton-abbey/news/a819685/downton-abbey-matthew-goode-joins-netflix-the-crown-lord-snowdon/">Digital Spy</a> previously reported, “Season three is apparently going to include Princess Margaret's five-year affair with baronet and gardening expert Roddy Llewellyn, who was 17 years younger than Margaret.”</p> <p>Now we just need to find out who will play the fun-to-hate Prince Philip...and Roddy Llewellyn.</p> <p><em>top photo: Helena Bonham Carter in The King's Speech</em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/193912-week-of-women-december-8-14.html">Week Of Women: December 8-14, 2017</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/movies/193968-oceans-8-trailer-release.html">This First Trailer For "Ocean's 8" Was Released And You Need To Watch It</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/13728-2015-02-12-22-42-13.html">7 Times Helena Bonham Carter Did Weird But Awesome Things, Like Cuddling A Fish In The Nude</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1rem;"><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/hbc_258fb.jpg" alt="hbc 258fb" class="blog-image" />&nbsp;</span></p> <p>There’s a lot to love about Netflix’s <em>The Crown</em> — gorgeous costumes, Claire Foy’s angry-yet-composed face, storylines that sends you straight to Wikipedia to find out what actually happened — but perhaps the best thing about <em>The Crown</em> is the character of Princess Margaret, played in the first and second seasons by Vanessa Kirby as a glamorous, snarky, constantly-smoking socialite with perfect eyeliner and incredibly bad luck with men.</p> <p><img src="https://media.vanityfair.com/photos/5872f08f90495e865d8eb7d6/master/w_690,c_limit/margaret.gif" alt="margaret" class="blog-image" /></p> <p>Netflix previously announced that <em>the Crown</em> will be changing actors for its third season — which makes sense. Season 1 took place from 1947 to 1956, and Season 2 took place from 1956 to 1963, meaning that 33-year-old Claire Foy played Queen Elizabeth II from age 21 to age 37. Actress Olivia Colman — who I looooved in <em>Peep Show</em> and who has been in many other movies and TV series including&nbsp;<em>Broadchurch, The Lobster, </em>and<em> Hot Fuzz</em>&nbsp;— has been confirmed to take over as Queen Elizabeth II in the next decade or so of her life.</p> <p>Now,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.standard.co.uk/news/londoners-diary/londoners-diary-bonham-carter-gets-her-tiara-in-the-next-crown-a3732761.html"><em>the London Evening Standard</em></a> reports that Helena Bonham Carter “is all but confirmed to play the inimitable royal" Princess Margaret, adding that Carter was originally in the running to play Queen Elizabeth II before the role went to Coleman. HBC previously played Elizabeth and Margaret’s mom in <em>the King’s Speech</em> (and so did Olivia Coleman, in <em>Hyde Park on Hudson</em>).</p> <p>Even better: It looks like Season 3 will contain a particularly juicy storyline for Princess Margaret. <a href="http://www.digitalspy.com/tv/downton-abbey/news/a819685/downton-abbey-matthew-goode-joins-netflix-the-crown-lord-snowdon/">Digital Spy</a> previously reported, “Season three is apparently going to include Princess Margaret's five-year affair with baronet and gardening expert Roddy Llewellyn, who was 17 years younger than Margaret.”</p> <p>Now we just need to find out who will play the fun-to-hate Prince Philip...and Roddy Llewellyn.</p> <p><em>top photo: Helena Bonham Carter in The King's Speech</em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/193912-week-of-women-december-8-14.html">Week Of Women: December 8-14, 2017</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/movies/193968-oceans-8-trailer-release.html">This First Trailer For "Ocean's 8" Was Released And You Need To Watch It</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/13728-2015-02-12-22-42-13.html">7 Times Helena Bonham Carter Did Weird But Awesome Things, Like Cuddling A Fish In The Nude</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> This YouTube Series Explains Almost Everything Wrong With "The Big Bang Theory" 2018-01-04T10:56:44-05:00 2018-01-04T10:56:44-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/194007-this-youtube-series-explains-almost-everything-wrong-with-the-big-bang-theory.html Gianna Folz Giannaroxy@gmail.com <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/38282/sheldon-cooper_d140c.jpg" alt="sheldon cooper d140c" class="blog-image" /></p> <p><span>There are some <a href="http://www.hindustantimes.com/tv/massive-egos-and-falling-ratings-spell-the-end-for-the-big-bang-theory/story-H4vFx13QYxiHJLnBoxdH8I.html">scattered rumors</a> over the internet that The Big Bang Theory <span>may wrap up after season 12, and if so, good riddance. If you have ever felt a tingle that something just might be wrong with the show but can’t place it, the wait is over. Over the summer, writer and artist Jonathan McIntosh created a couple videos on his YouTube channel <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHiwtz2tCEfS17N9A-WoSSw">Pop Culture Detective</a>. The videos explain&nbsp;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3-hOigoxHs&t=829s">“The Adorkable Misogyny of <em>The Big Bang Theory</em>”</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L7NRONADJ4&t=1s">“The Complexity of Geek Masculinity on <em>the Big Bang Theory</em>.”</a></span></span></p> <p>For those unfamiliar with the series,&nbsp;<em>The Big Bang Theory</em>&nbsp;is featured around five main characters living California. Four are socially awkward, mostly white men with genius level IQs, and the other is an aspiring actress and waitress, a love interest of one of the main men and the show's "brainless beauty" trope.</p> <p>Over 11 seasons, <i>The Big Bang Theory</i> has repeatedly reinforced the idea of #YesAllMen. The main men of the show are albeit unusual to mainstream television as they are all dorky, well-educated and lack social skills and conventional male beauty standards, such as being physically fit or above a certain height. But these “lovable nerds” still somehow aggressively objectify women. That objectification is the crux of the jokes on the show. Nerds can sexualize women to the same extent as jocks.</p> <p>Jonathan McIntosh says in his first video, “It is their status as nerdy nice guys that then lets them off the hook for a wide range of creepy, entitled and downright sexist behaviors.”</p> <p>In Season 6, Episode 12, leading man Sheldon Cooper, played by Jim Parsons — who was TV's highest paid actor in 2017 — tells his female lab assistant that she isn't succeeding because she is, "full of eggs and only appealing for a short time." But since he is portayed as a socially awkward nerd, his actions are seen as harmless.</p> <p>But how can these jokes get past millions of viewers? McIntosh mentioned something called “ironic lampshading.” Lampshading is a technique that writers will use to point out flaws in the script to the audience. When writers lampshade, they can get away with having questionable or implausible content. In the case of <i>The Big Bang Theory</i>, the writers continually use sexist jokes for laughs and then point out the jokes in an attempt to rectify them.</p> <p>One example of lampshading can be seen in a clip from “The Adorkable Misogyny of <em>The Big Bang Theory.</em>” Leading men Howard and Raj hack a bunch of technology to find the house that the cast of <em>America’s Next Top Model</em> is staying at so they can stalk and creep on the women. Leading man Leonard tells Howard and Raj what all the female audience is thinking: “What you’re doing is really creepy.” By acknowledging that a character is making a sexist, racist, homophobic joke, shows can get away with having these jokes in the first place.</p> <p>If you want to learn more, watch the full videos below:</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/X3-hOigoxHs" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7L7NRONADJ4?t=1s" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><em>&nbsp;Photo via The Big Bang Theory / CBS</em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/movies/194005-bomb-cyclone-netflix.html">6 Movies Starring Women To Watch On Netflix During The "Bomb Cyclone"</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/16477-where-are-all-the-smart-women-in-geek-comedies.html">Where Are All The Smart Women In 'Geek Comedies'?</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/15580-back-with-a-bang.html">Mayim Bialik's BUST Interview: From The Archives</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/38282/sheldon-cooper_d140c.jpg" alt="sheldon cooper d140c" class="blog-image" /></p> <p><span>There are some <a href="http://www.hindustantimes.com/tv/massive-egos-and-falling-ratings-spell-the-end-for-the-big-bang-theory/story-H4vFx13QYxiHJLnBoxdH8I.html">scattered rumors</a> over the internet that The Big Bang Theory <span>may wrap up after season 12, and if so, good riddance. If you have ever felt a tingle that something just might be wrong with the show but can’t place it, the wait is over. Over the summer, writer and artist Jonathan McIntosh created a couple videos on his YouTube channel <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHiwtz2tCEfS17N9A-WoSSw">Pop Culture Detective</a>. The videos explain&nbsp;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3-hOigoxHs&t=829s">“The Adorkable Misogyny of <em>The Big Bang Theory</em>”</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L7NRONADJ4&t=1s">“The Complexity of Geek Masculinity on <em>the Big Bang Theory</em>.”</a></span></span></p> <p>For those unfamiliar with the series,&nbsp;<em>The Big Bang Theory</em>&nbsp;is featured around five main characters living California. Four are socially awkward, mostly white men with genius level IQs, and the other is an aspiring actress and waitress, a love interest of one of the main men and the show's "brainless beauty" trope.</p> <p>Over 11 seasons, <i>The Big Bang Theory</i> has repeatedly reinforced the idea of #YesAllMen. The main men of the show are albeit unusual to mainstream television as they are all dorky, well-educated and lack social skills and conventional male beauty standards, such as being physically fit or above a certain height. But these “lovable nerds” still somehow aggressively objectify women. That objectification is the crux of the jokes on the show. Nerds can sexualize women to the same extent as jocks.</p> <p>Jonathan McIntosh says in his first video, “It is their status as nerdy nice guys that then lets them off the hook for a wide range of creepy, entitled and downright sexist behaviors.”</p> <p>In Season 6, Episode 12, leading man Sheldon Cooper, played by Jim Parsons — who was TV's highest paid actor in 2017 — tells his female lab assistant that she isn't succeeding because she is, "full of eggs and only appealing for a short time." But since he is portayed as a socially awkward nerd, his actions are seen as harmless.</p> <p>But how can these jokes get past millions of viewers? McIntosh mentioned something called “ironic lampshading.” Lampshading is a technique that writers will use to point out flaws in the script to the audience. When writers lampshade, they can get away with having questionable or implausible content. In the case of <i>The Big Bang Theory</i>, the writers continually use sexist jokes for laughs and then point out the jokes in an attempt to rectify them.</p> <p>One example of lampshading can be seen in a clip from “The Adorkable Misogyny of <em>The Big Bang Theory.</em>” Leading men Howard and Raj hack a bunch of technology to find the house that the cast of <em>America’s Next Top Model</em> is staying at so they can stalk and creep on the women. Leading man Leonard tells Howard and Raj what all the female audience is thinking: “What you’re doing is really creepy.” By acknowledging that a character is making a sexist, racist, homophobic joke, shows can get away with having these jokes in the first place.</p> <p>If you want to learn more, watch the full videos below:</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/X3-hOigoxHs" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7L7NRONADJ4?t=1s" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><em>&nbsp;Photo via The Big Bang Theory / CBS</em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/movies/194005-bomb-cyclone-netflix.html">6 Movies Starring Women To Watch On Netflix During The "Bomb Cyclone"</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/16477-where-are-all-the-smart-women-in-geek-comedies.html">Where Are All The Smart Women In 'Geek Comedies'?</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/15580-back-with-a-bang.html">Mayim Bialik's BUST Interview: From The Archives</a></p> After Her Viral "Tonight Show" Video, Comedian Patti Harrison Is On The Rise: BUST Interview 2018-01-03T11:12:06-05:00 2018-01-03T11:12:06-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/193999-patti-harrison-interview.html BUST Magazine socialmedia@bust.com <p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/Andersen_Patti_91A7348_v1_final_b153d.jpg" alt="Andersen Patti 91A7348 v1 final b153d" class="blog-image" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1rem;">Around 6 a.m. on the morning of July 26, Donald Trump sent out a series of tweets announcing that trans people would no longer be accepted in the U.S. Military. Comedian Patti Harrison was on her way to record a radio commercial in Long Island, NY, when she heard the news—and not long after, she got an unexpected call.<em> The Tonight Show</em> with Jimmy Fallon wanted her to perform a monologue about Trump’s proposed trans ban. 
“Now, I don’t necessarily want to serve in the military, but I want the right to serve, you know?” she said that night, center stage, for an audience of approximately three million at-home viewers. “It’s like, I don’t want to go to your baby shower, but I want the invite.”</span><span style="font-size: 1rem;"></span></p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RLTAcsewIQw?t=222s" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p>The video of her set quickly went viral. “It changed my life,” Harrison tells me. Among other opportunities, it paved the way for a TV pilot she recently wrote, and she was offered a role in the Paul Feig-directed <em>A Simple Favor</em>. It will be her first film, but not her first acting gig, as she’d already booked roles on both <em>Broad City</em> and <em>Search Party</em> before appearing on <em>The Tonight Show</em>. I meet the 27-year-old in a Brooklyn bar where Harrison has just performed a standup set very different from her Fallon monologue. It involved crowd work, jokes about her home state of Ohio, and a story about an imaginary, vicious dog attack.</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/Andersen_Patti_91A6728_V1_final_05f86.jpg" alt="Andersen Patti 91A6728 V1 final 05f86" class="blog-image" /><br /><br />The Fallon monologue, she says, “is pretty far from my actual comedic voice,” though she’s glad TV shows are reaching out to trans people to speak about trans rights. She’s also grateful for the money and the press, but says people now “expect my comedy to be like a big trans anthem,” while “the stuff that I think is funny is really dumb, stupid-ass characters who are gross and bad.” And animals. In fact, before <em>The Tonight Show</em>, Harrison was probably best known for her Seriously.TV series <em>Patti Reviews: Exotic Animals</em>, which is exactly what it sounds like. (“This snake has no legs,” she observes in one episode. “That means no thigh gap.”)</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a61RuEEF7gk?t=65s&list=PLPGwHnW-HgFkLEU3-PxUTB1ag0m0g7jLw&index=12" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe><br /><br />Even though Harrison’s set before our interview didn’t discuss her gender identity, she still had to contend with a transphobic heckler, who, when another comedian asked the audience to shout out their worst fears, yelled, “Transgender!” Though Harrison says that the heckling was “very timid,” she admits, “I was very nervous about that guy. I think that’s something that keeps a lot of trans people from doing comedy, or anything where we have to go onstage—the fear of public ridicule. Because being trans has been a punchline for so long, in television, film, and media, you go into these rooms and you’re expecting to have jokes made at your expense.” <br /><br />Though Harrison is currently pursuing writing and acting (“I want to be the Eddie Redmayne of the trans community and take a bunch of roles meant for cis people”), she says that live comedy is still “the most rewarding thing.” “I wrote this, I’m performing it, it’s my voice making the noises,” she says. “I either get laughs or I get silence, but at least I did that, and it’s all mine.”</p> <p><em>By Erika W. Smith<br />Photos by Bek Anderson</em></p> <p><i>This article originally appeared in the December/January 2017 print edition of BUST Magazine.</i><a href="https://subscriptions.bust.com/magazine/signup.php?product_id=11"><i> Subscribe today!</i></a></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193991-hbo-releases-2-dope-queens-comedy-special-teaser-trailer.html">The 2 Dope Queens Comedy Special Trailer Is Here And It's Everything</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193925-jay-pharaoh-interview.html">Jay Pharoah On How Comedy Helped Him Survive Depression</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193762-sarah-silverman.html">Sarah Silverman On "I Love You, America" And Trying To Understand Trump Supporters</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> <p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/Andersen_Patti_91A7348_v1_final_b153d.jpg" alt="Andersen Patti 91A7348 v1 final b153d" class="blog-image" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1rem;">Around 6 a.m. on the morning of July 26, Donald Trump sent out a series of tweets announcing that trans people would no longer be accepted in the U.S. Military. Comedian Patti Harrison was on her way to record a radio commercial in Long Island, NY, when she heard the news—and not long after, she got an unexpected call.<em> The Tonight Show</em> with Jimmy Fallon wanted her to perform a monologue about Trump’s proposed trans ban. 
“Now, I don’t necessarily want to serve in the military, but I want the right to serve, you know?” she said that night, center stage, for an audience of approximately three million at-home viewers. “It’s like, I don’t want to go to your baby shower, but I want the invite.”</span><span style="font-size: 1rem;"></span></p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RLTAcsewIQw?t=222s" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p>The video of her set quickly went viral. “It changed my life,” Harrison tells me. Among other opportunities, it paved the way for a TV pilot she recently wrote, and she was offered a role in the Paul Feig-directed <em>A Simple Favor</em>. It will be her first film, but not her first acting gig, as she’d already booked roles on both <em>Broad City</em> and <em>Search Party</em> before appearing on <em>The Tonight Show</em>. I meet the 27-year-old in a Brooklyn bar where Harrison has just performed a standup set very different from her Fallon monologue. It involved crowd work, jokes about her home state of Ohio, and a story about an imaginary, vicious dog attack.</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/Andersen_Patti_91A6728_V1_final_05f86.jpg" alt="Andersen Patti 91A6728 V1 final 05f86" class="blog-image" /><br /><br />The Fallon monologue, she says, “is pretty far from my actual comedic voice,” though she’s glad TV shows are reaching out to trans people to speak about trans rights. She’s also grateful for the money and the press, but says people now “expect my comedy to be like a big trans anthem,” while “the stuff that I think is funny is really dumb, stupid-ass characters who are gross and bad.” And animals. In fact, before <em>The Tonight Show</em>, Harrison was probably best known for her Seriously.TV series <em>Patti Reviews: Exotic Animals</em>, which is exactly what it sounds like. (“This snake has no legs,” she observes in one episode. “That means no thigh gap.”)</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a61RuEEF7gk?t=65s&list=PLPGwHnW-HgFkLEU3-PxUTB1ag0m0g7jLw&index=12" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe><br /><br />Even though Harrison’s set before our interview didn’t discuss her gender identity, she still had to contend with a transphobic heckler, who, when another comedian asked the audience to shout out their worst fears, yelled, “Transgender!” Though Harrison says that the heckling was “very timid,” she admits, “I was very nervous about that guy. I think that’s something that keeps a lot of trans people from doing comedy, or anything where we have to go onstage—the fear of public ridicule. Because being trans has been a punchline for so long, in television, film, and media, you go into these rooms and you’re expecting to have jokes made at your expense.” <br /><br />Though Harrison is currently pursuing writing and acting (“I want to be the Eddie Redmayne of the trans community and take a bunch of roles meant for cis people”), she says that live comedy is still “the most rewarding thing.” “I wrote this, I’m performing it, it’s my voice making the noises,” she says. “I either get laughs or I get silence, but at least I did that, and it’s all mine.”</p> <p><em>By Erika W. Smith<br />Photos by Bek Anderson</em></p> <p><i>This article originally appeared in the December/January 2017 print edition of BUST Magazine.</i><a href="https://subscriptions.bust.com/magazine/signup.php?product_id=11"><i> Subscribe today!</i></a></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193991-hbo-releases-2-dope-queens-comedy-special-teaser-trailer.html">The 2 Dope Queens Comedy Special Trailer Is Here And It's Everything</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193925-jay-pharaoh-interview.html">Jay Pharoah On How Comedy Helped Him Survive Depression</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193762-sarah-silverman.html">Sarah Silverman On "I Love You, America" And Trying To Understand Trump Supporters</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </p> Hoda Kotb Replaces Matt Lauer on “Today,” Because 2018 Is The Year of Women 2018-01-02T11:36:43-05:00 2018-01-02T11:36:43-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/193995-hoda-kotb-replaces-matt-lauer-on-nbc-today.html Anna Wesche anna.wesche@yahoo.com <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/38254/Hoda_a0ae2.jpg" alt="Hoda.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></p> <p>NBC announced on Tuesday morning that Hoda Kotb would be replacing Matt Lauer as co-anchor of the network’s morning show, <em>Today</em>. Kotb had temporarily replaced Lauer after he was fired in November over sexual harassment allegations, reports the <em><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/02/business/media/hoda-kotb-today-matt-lauer.html?_r=0">New York Times</a>.</em></p> <p>The combined team of Kotb and Savannah Guthrie, the other anchor of <em>Today</em>, will be the first time that two women will be the show’s official main hosts.</p> <p>Guthrie welcomed Kotb to the show Tuesday morning. “This has to be the most popular decision NBC News has ever made, and I am so thrilled.” &nbsp;</p> <p>Kotb responded, “I’m pinching myself.”</p> <p>Guthrie later added, “You are a partner and a friend and a sister and I am so happy to be doing this.”</p> <p>Considering <em>Today</em> is bolstered by a largely female audience, the move makes sense, and we’re excited to see the first of what we hope to be more female representation in the news, and television screens in general.&nbsp;Kotb will continue to co-host the fourth hour of the program with Kathie Lee Gifford.</p> <p>Several of her “Today” colleagues took to Twitter to congratulate her, including Jenna Bush Hager, Carson Daly, and Al Roker. The new anchors and their colleagues also celebrated with champagne at the end of the second hour of the program.</p> <p>Not a bad way to kick off 2018. Cheers, Hoda!</p> <div style="position: relative; padding-bottom: calc(56.25% + 50px); height: 0;"><iframe style="position: absolute; width: 100%; height: 100%;" src="https://www.today.com/offsite/hoda-kotb-joins-savannah-guthrie-as-co-anchor-of-today-1127535171901" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" width="100%" height="100%"></iframe></div> <p><em>Photo via NBC's Today.</em></p> <p><strong><em></em>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/feminism/193703-an-incomplete-and-constantly-expanding-list-of-famous-men-accused-of-sexual-harassment-in-the-past-month.html">An Incomplete (And Constantly Expanding) List Of Powerful Men Accused Of Sexual Harrassment And Assault Since Harvey Weinstein</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/living/193994-men-fear-you.html">If Men Fear You, Let Them</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/general/193871-trump-insane-november-2017.html">Trump Continues His Public Fight Against Sanity This Week&nbsp;</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/38254/Hoda_a0ae2.jpg" alt="Hoda.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></p> <p>NBC announced on Tuesday morning that Hoda Kotb would be replacing Matt Lauer as co-anchor of the network’s morning show, <em>Today</em>. Kotb had temporarily replaced Lauer after he was fired in November over sexual harassment allegations, reports the <em><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/02/business/media/hoda-kotb-today-matt-lauer.html?_r=0">New York Times</a>.</em></p> <p>The combined team of Kotb and Savannah Guthrie, the other anchor of <em>Today</em>, will be the first time that two women will be the show’s official main hosts.</p> <p>Guthrie welcomed Kotb to the show Tuesday morning. “This has to be the most popular decision NBC News has ever made, and I am so thrilled.” &nbsp;</p> <p>Kotb responded, “I’m pinching myself.”</p> <p>Guthrie later added, “You are a partner and a friend and a sister and I am so happy to be doing this.”</p> <p>Considering <em>Today</em> is bolstered by a largely female audience, the move makes sense, and we’re excited to see the first of what we hope to be more female representation in the news, and television screens in general.&nbsp;Kotb will continue to co-host the fourth hour of the program with Kathie Lee Gifford.</p> <p>Several of her “Today” colleagues took to Twitter to congratulate her, including Jenna Bush Hager, Carson Daly, and Al Roker. The new anchors and their colleagues also celebrated with champagne at the end of the second hour of the program.</p> <p>Not a bad way to kick off 2018. Cheers, Hoda!</p> <div style="position: relative; padding-bottom: calc(56.25% + 50px); height: 0;"><iframe style="position: absolute; width: 100%; height: 100%;" src="https://www.today.com/offsite/hoda-kotb-joins-savannah-guthrie-as-co-anchor-of-today-1127535171901" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" width="100%" height="100%"></iframe></div> <p><em>Photo via NBC's Today.</em></p> <p><strong><em></em>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/feminism/193703-an-incomplete-and-constantly-expanding-list-of-famous-men-accused-of-sexual-harassment-in-the-past-month.html">An Incomplete (And Constantly Expanding) List Of Powerful Men Accused Of Sexual Harrassment And Assault Since Harvey Weinstein</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/living/193994-men-fear-you.html">If Men Fear You, Let Them</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/general/193871-trump-insane-november-2017.html">Trump Continues His Public Fight Against Sanity This Week&nbsp;</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> The 2 Dope Queens Comedy Special Teaser Is Here And It's Everything 2017-12-22T11:33:08-05:00 2017-12-22T11:33:08-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/193991-hbo-releases-2-dope-queens-comedy-special-teaser-trailer.html Cricket Epstein epstein.cs@gmail.com <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/38050/2_dope_queens_hbo_df5d8.jpg" alt="2 dope queens hbo df5d8" class="blog-image" style="font-size: 1rem;" /></p> <p>In case you have been too busy building your nuclear fallout shelter to keep up with the good things that are happening in pop culture, BUST is here to tell you that the reigning queens of comedy, Pheobe Robinson and Jessica Williams, are bestowing upon us mere plebeians the ultimate winter gift: a <em>2 Dope Queens</em> four-part comedy special set to air on HBO beginning on February 2nd. That’s right. You will be able to watch 8 hours of the “dopest queens to ever queen in the history of queening” from the comfort of your own throne (aka bed) very, very soon.</p> <p>Released earlier this week, HBO’s teaser trailer is, of course, hilarious. And it includes a little bit of everything — race, hair, pop culture — these ruling ladies cover in their comedy-show podcast <em>2 Dope Queens</em>. Like the podcast, which you can read about <a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/16046-jessica-williams-and-phoebe-robinson-launch-your-new-favorite-podcast-2-dope-queens.html">here</a> and, if you haven’t already, start listening to <em>immediately&nbsp;</em> <a href="https://www.npr.org/podcasts/481107308/2-dope-queens">here</a>, the comedy special will feature other comedians and actors, including, as reported by <a href="http://ew.com/tv/2017/12/19/2-dope-queens-trailer-premiere-date-hbo/">Entertainment Weekly</a>, Jon Stewart, Sarah Jessica Parker, Tituss Burgess, and Uzo Aduba. To top it all off, the special is directed by Tig Notaro. All in all, it promises to be nothing less than mind-blowingly good.</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rMp7iGHtMso?time_continue=2" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><em>Top Photo courtesy of HBO</em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/15553-jessica-williams-on-beyonce-feminism-and-dealing-with-haters-bust-interview.html?catid=0">Jessica Williams On Beyoncé, Feminism, And Dealing With Haters: BUST Interview</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/16046-jessica-williams-and-phoebe-robinson-launch-your-new-favorite-podcast-2-dope-queens.html">Jessica Williams And Phoebe Robinson Launch Your New Favorite Podcast, ‘2 Dope Queens’</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/movies/193153-black-women-black-panther-marvel.html">The Black Women Of Marvel's "Black Panther" Are Slaying The Scene</a>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/38050/2_dope_queens_hbo_df5d8.jpg" alt="2 dope queens hbo df5d8" class="blog-image" style="font-size: 1rem;" /></p> <p>In case you have been too busy building your nuclear fallout shelter to keep up with the good things that are happening in pop culture, BUST is here to tell you that the reigning queens of comedy, Pheobe Robinson and Jessica Williams, are bestowing upon us mere plebeians the ultimate winter gift: a <em>2 Dope Queens</em> four-part comedy special set to air on HBO beginning on February 2nd. That’s right. You will be able to watch 8 hours of the “dopest queens to ever queen in the history of queening” from the comfort of your own throne (aka bed) very, very soon.</p> <p>Released earlier this week, HBO’s teaser trailer is, of course, hilarious. And it includes a little bit of everything — race, hair, pop culture — these ruling ladies cover in their comedy-show podcast <em>2 Dope Queens</em>. Like the podcast, which you can read about <a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/16046-jessica-williams-and-phoebe-robinson-launch-your-new-favorite-podcast-2-dope-queens.html">here</a> and, if you haven’t already, start listening to <em>immediately&nbsp;</em> <a href="https://www.npr.org/podcasts/481107308/2-dope-queens">here</a>, the comedy special will feature other comedians and actors, including, as reported by <a href="http://ew.com/tv/2017/12/19/2-dope-queens-trailer-premiere-date-hbo/">Entertainment Weekly</a>, Jon Stewart, Sarah Jessica Parker, Tituss Burgess, and Uzo Aduba. To top it all off, the special is directed by Tig Notaro. All in all, it promises to be nothing less than mind-blowingly good.</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" style="border: 1px solid #000000;" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rMp7iGHtMso?time_continue=2" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" class="mceItemMedia mceItemIframe"></iframe></p> <p><em>Top Photo courtesy of HBO</em></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/15553-jessica-williams-on-beyonce-feminism-and-dealing-with-haters-bust-interview.html?catid=0">Jessica Williams On Beyoncé, Feminism, And Dealing With Haters: BUST Interview</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/16046-jessica-williams-and-phoebe-robinson-launch-your-new-favorite-podcast-2-dope-queens.html">Jessica Williams And Phoebe Robinson Launch Your New Favorite Podcast, ‘2 Dope Queens’</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/movies/193153-black-women-black-panther-marvel.html">The Black Women Of Marvel's "Black Panther" Are Slaying The Scene</a>&nbsp;</p> How "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" Represents Jewish Women 2017-12-19T13:12:44-05:00 2017-12-19T13:12:44-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/193966-marvelous-mrs-maisel-jewish-women-representation.html Rafaella Gunz gunzrafaella@gmail.com <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/mrsmaisel_44dd1.jpg" alt="mrsmaisel 44dd1" class="blog-image" />&nbsp;</p> <p>Upon Amazon’s cancellation of <em>Good Girls Revolt</em>, I was pretty peeved. Aside from <em>Transparent</em> (which is its own bag of worms — an article for another time), it seemed like the company didn’t really care about creating content for the large demographic of female viewers.&nbsp;But now, Amazon has gifted us with <em>The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel</em>. The show, starring Rachel Brosnahan as the title character of Miriam (Midge) Maisel, is about a housewife in the 1950s who pursues comedy following a nasty breakup with her husband.</p> <p>As a Jewish woman, I personally found it refreshing to see a Jewish female character have her own story on a TV show and be portrayed in a positive light. With the exception of Rachel Bloom's character Rebecca Bunch in <em>Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,</em> this is a rarity.&nbsp;Throughout television history, Jewish women have been portrayed as “<a href="https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/gender-stereotypes-in-television/">loud, vulgar, spoiled, and unattractive</a>.” They frequently appear as unappealing caricatures.</p> <p>“When young Jewish women are on screen, they often fit the model of the spoiled Jewish princess looking for bargains and a man, preferably a wealthy doctor to take care of them (e.g., Fran Fine on <em>The Nanny</em>), or they are frumpy and unattractive (Fran on <em>Mad About You</em>, Rhoda on <em>The Mary Tyler Moore Show</em>, Brenda on <em>Rhoda</em>),” writes Joyce Antler for <a href="https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/gender-stereotypes-in-television/">My Jewish Learning</a>.</p> <p>“Although Jewish-princess and Jewish-mother jokes make for easy, quick laughs, such humor is cruel and upsetting to Jewish women, lessening self-esteem, particularly for younger women, who especially rely on the media for their role models, while shaping male attitudes toward Jewish women in negative ways,” Antler continues. “Those non-Jews with little acquaintance with Jewish women tend to accept the stereotypes as real.”</p> <p><em>The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel</em> makes references to keeping kosher, holidays like Yom Kippur, and other nods toward the Jewish community. Considering<a href="https://www.adl.org/education/resources/fact-sheets/global-anti-semitism-selected-incidents-around-the-world-in-2017"> the huge increase of anti-Semitism this past year</a>, it’s a relief to see Jews represented in a positive light.</p> <p>However, unlike Rachel Bloom, who is actually Jewish, Brosnahan is not.&nbsp;The show’s creator and writer Amy Sherman-Palladino's mother was Southern Baptist and her father was Jewish, and she has said<a href="http://www.vulture.com/2013/02/amy-sherman-palladino-2000-year-old-man.html"> she was raised "sort of" Jewish</a>. Learning this did put a damper on my excitement for the show, but I still enjoyed it nonetheless, despite some strange moments that I don’t think <em>actual</em> Jewish characters would tolerate.&nbsp;For instance, in one of the show’s later episodes, Midge seems pretty okay with a guy doing a Hitler impersonation. And considering the show is meant to take place in the late 1950s — only about 10 years since World War II — that “joke” fell pretty flat.</p> <p>I spoke with other Jewish women about their thoughts on the show.&nbsp;“Representation matters, and not just of the obvious Jews with kippahs and payot who stand out in the crowd for the obligatory Jewish inclusion, or the funny Jews who just say they are Jewish, throw in the random ‘oy vey,’ joke about their noses and hair, and call that representation,” says Ari Kras, a 31-year-old living in Washington D.C. “This is truly one of the only mainstream shows that I have seen that I saw myself in.”</p> <p>However, others were not too impressed by the show, citing disappointment in the casting choice (again, Brosnahan isn’t Jewish); and the fact Midge comes from a wealthy Jewish family on New York’s Upper West Side, which doesn’t resonate with working-class Jews. In fact,<a href="https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/news/.premium-1.528327"> a 2013 report</a> found that about 30% of all New Yorkers living in a Jewish household are poor or near-poor.&nbsp;Over the past two decades, this number has nearly doubled — from 70,000 impoverished Jewish households in 1991 to 130,000 in 2011.&nbsp;About&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ujafedny.org/news/new-report-reveals-dramatic-rise-in-poverty-in-jewish-community/" style="font-weight: 400;">90% of poor Jewish households are in New York City</a>. In 2012, only 7% of New York Jewish households reported an annual income of $250,000 or more, while 42% reported incomes of less than $50,000. 37% of households reported that they were “just managing” to make ends meet, according to&nbsp;<a href="https://forward.com/news/157766/changing-face-of-new-york-jewry/" style="font-weight: 400;">The Forward</a>. These statistics mostly affect the elderly, children, the disabled, and single-parent households.&nbsp;“Poverty in the Jewish community continues to grow at an alarming rate, much faster than the Jewish community as a whole,” writes&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ujafedny.org/news/new-report-reveals-dramatic-rise-in-poverty-in-jewish-community/">Dr. Jacob B. Ukeles</a>, who led the 2011 report on Jewish poverty.</p> <p>“I, for one, can’t relate to the Upper West Side bit and the Columbia professor [Midge’s father] and well-traveled background. I would have much more enjoyed the show had it taken place like, in Astoria, in a more blue collar, first generation family that is actually probably more typical of most of the Jewish population,” says Addison Levy*, a 24-year-old living in Florida.</p> <p>“My only thought about [the show] is that it isn't actually Jewish women's representation,” says Sylvanna Seydel, a 40-year-old living in New Mexico. “The actress who plays the title character isn't Jewish, but apparently thinks that growing up in a Jewish neighborhood makes her enough of an expert to play a Jewish woman,” she continues, referring to <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chicagoinc/ct-ent-rachel-brosnahan-marvelous-mrs-maisel-20171127-story.html">Brosnahan’s upbringing</a> in Chicago’s Jewish Highland Park neighborhood.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1rem;">“Casting a [non-Jewish woman] to play a Jewish shero and martyr is a special kind of goyish bullshit,” Seydel states. “I'm actually boycotting all movies and TV shows that tell Jewish stories without casting actual Jews. The only time Jewish actors get cast to play Jewish characters is when we're playing the villains or the comic relief. We never get to play the heroes of our own stories, and I'm 100% done with it.”</span></p> <p>“I was kinda disappointed with the representation,” says Grace Goldman*, a 22-year-old living in New York. “I would’ve loved it had been a more blue collar Jewish New York story. Most of even the wealthiest Jewish families I know come from a background like that, my family included.”</p> <p>“Also, kinda disappointed about the goyische actress when I know from experience that existing in the industry as a Jewish actress is often a strange place in which ‘Jew-y’ Jewish girls always get character roles (not ‘Jewish looking’ Jewish girls), get praised, and given ingenue-type roles,” she continues.<br /><br />Overall, I liked the show. Midge comes off as a trailblazer for female comedians, like how<em> Good Girls Revolt</em> was about trailblazing female journalists. Set in the 1950s, Midge is on stage talking about female sexuality, definitely a taboo back then. Additionally, the show depicts the downfall of the “appropriate” female lifestyle — getting married right out of college and being a stay-at-home mother who never has to lift a finger. In the 1950s, way before divorce was normal and single working mothers were commonplace, Midge considers divorcing her husband. She gets a job at a department store, and still manages to find time to pursue comedy. She defies the “norm” of womanhood at the time. In this way, Midge can be seen as an icon for breaking convention.</p> <p>Yet, for season two (which was already confirmed), I do hope the writers and producers consider getting input from actual Jews — especially Jews who were around in 1950s New York. And maybe, just maybe, they’ll hire actual Jewish actors for new roles on the show.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="font-weight: 400;"><em>* = A pseudonym was used for the last name at the request of the interviewee</em></p> <p><em>Top photo: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel/Amazon</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/193890-the-hotness-december-january-2018.html">BUST's 10 Best Bets For Winter 2017</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/193843-week-of-women-november-24-30.html">Week Of Women: November 24-30, 2017</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/18649-gilmore-girls-year-in-the-life.html">"Gilmore Girls: A Year In The Life" — The Good, The Bad, And The WTF</a><span style="font-size: 1rem;"></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/mrsmaisel_44dd1.jpg" alt="mrsmaisel 44dd1" class="blog-image" />&nbsp;</p> <p>Upon Amazon’s cancellation of <em>Good Girls Revolt</em>, I was pretty peeved. Aside from <em>Transparent</em> (which is its own bag of worms — an article for another time), it seemed like the company didn’t really care about creating content for the large demographic of female viewers.&nbsp;But now, Amazon has gifted us with <em>The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel</em>. The show, starring Rachel Brosnahan as the title character of Miriam (Midge) Maisel, is about a housewife in the 1950s who pursues comedy following a nasty breakup with her husband.</p> <p>As a Jewish woman, I personally found it refreshing to see a Jewish female character have her own story on a TV show and be portrayed in a positive light. With the exception of Rachel Bloom's character Rebecca Bunch in <em>Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,</em> this is a rarity.&nbsp;Throughout television history, Jewish women have been portrayed as “<a href="https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/gender-stereotypes-in-television/">loud, vulgar, spoiled, and unattractive</a>.” They frequently appear as unappealing caricatures.</p> <p>“When young Jewish women are on screen, they often fit the model of the spoiled Jewish princess looking for bargains and a man, preferably a wealthy doctor to take care of them (e.g., Fran Fine on <em>The Nanny</em>), or they are frumpy and unattractive (Fran on <em>Mad About You</em>, Rhoda on <em>The Mary Tyler Moore Show</em>, Brenda on <em>Rhoda</em>),” writes Joyce Antler for <a href="https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/gender-stereotypes-in-television/">My Jewish Learning</a>.</p> <p>“Although Jewish-princess and Jewish-mother jokes make for easy, quick laughs, such humor is cruel and upsetting to Jewish women, lessening self-esteem, particularly for younger women, who especially rely on the media for their role models, while shaping male attitudes toward Jewish women in negative ways,” Antler continues. “Those non-Jews with little acquaintance with Jewish women tend to accept the stereotypes as real.”</p> <p><em>The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel</em> makes references to keeping kosher, holidays like Yom Kippur, and other nods toward the Jewish community. Considering<a href="https://www.adl.org/education/resources/fact-sheets/global-anti-semitism-selected-incidents-around-the-world-in-2017"> the huge increase of anti-Semitism this past year</a>, it’s a relief to see Jews represented in a positive light.</p> <p>However, unlike Rachel Bloom, who is actually Jewish, Brosnahan is not.&nbsp;The show’s creator and writer Amy Sherman-Palladino's mother was Southern Baptist and her father was Jewish, and she has said<a href="http://www.vulture.com/2013/02/amy-sherman-palladino-2000-year-old-man.html"> she was raised "sort of" Jewish</a>. Learning this did put a damper on my excitement for the show, but I still enjoyed it nonetheless, despite some strange moments that I don’t think <em>actual</em> Jewish characters would tolerate.&nbsp;For instance, in one of the show’s later episodes, Midge seems pretty okay with a guy doing a Hitler impersonation. And considering the show is meant to take place in the late 1950s — only about 10 years since World War II — that “joke” fell pretty flat.</p> <p>I spoke with other Jewish women about their thoughts on the show.&nbsp;“Representation matters, and not just of the obvious Jews with kippahs and payot who stand out in the crowd for the obligatory Jewish inclusion, or the funny Jews who just say they are Jewish, throw in the random ‘oy vey,’ joke about their noses and hair, and call that representation,” says Ari Kras, a 31-year-old living in Washington D.C. “This is truly one of the only mainstream shows that I have seen that I saw myself in.”</p> <p>However, others were not too impressed by the show, citing disappointment in the casting choice (again, Brosnahan isn’t Jewish); and the fact Midge comes from a wealthy Jewish family on New York’s Upper West Side, which doesn’t resonate with working-class Jews. In fact,<a href="https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/news/.premium-1.528327"> a 2013 report</a> found that about 30% of all New Yorkers living in a Jewish household are poor or near-poor.&nbsp;Over the past two decades, this number has nearly doubled — from 70,000 impoverished Jewish households in 1991 to 130,000 in 2011.&nbsp;About&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ujafedny.org/news/new-report-reveals-dramatic-rise-in-poverty-in-jewish-community/" style="font-weight: 400;">90% of poor Jewish households are in New York City</a>. In 2012, only 7% of New York Jewish households reported an annual income of $250,000 or more, while 42% reported incomes of less than $50,000. 37% of households reported that they were “just managing” to make ends meet, according to&nbsp;<a href="https://forward.com/news/157766/changing-face-of-new-york-jewry/" style="font-weight: 400;">The Forward</a>. These statistics mostly affect the elderly, children, the disabled, and single-parent households.&nbsp;“Poverty in the Jewish community continues to grow at an alarming rate, much faster than the Jewish community as a whole,” writes&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ujafedny.org/news/new-report-reveals-dramatic-rise-in-poverty-in-jewish-community/">Dr. Jacob B. Ukeles</a>, who led the 2011 report on Jewish poverty.</p> <p>“I, for one, can’t relate to the Upper West Side bit and the Columbia professor [Midge’s father] and well-traveled background. I would have much more enjoyed the show had it taken place like, in Astoria, in a more blue collar, first generation family that is actually probably more typical of most of the Jewish population,” says Addison Levy*, a 24-year-old living in Florida.</p> <p>“My only thought about [the show] is that it isn't actually Jewish women's representation,” says Sylvanna Seydel, a 40-year-old living in New Mexico. “The actress who plays the title character isn't Jewish, but apparently thinks that growing up in a Jewish neighborhood makes her enough of an expert to play a Jewish woman,” she continues, referring to <a href="http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chicagoinc/ct-ent-rachel-brosnahan-marvelous-mrs-maisel-20171127-story.html">Brosnahan’s upbringing</a> in Chicago’s Jewish Highland Park neighborhood.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1rem;">“Casting a [non-Jewish woman] to play a Jewish shero and martyr is a special kind of goyish bullshit,” Seydel states. “I'm actually boycotting all movies and TV shows that tell Jewish stories without casting actual Jews. The only time Jewish actors get cast to play Jewish characters is when we're playing the villains or the comic relief. We never get to play the heroes of our own stories, and I'm 100% done with it.”</span></p> <p>“I was kinda disappointed with the representation,” says Grace Goldman*, a 22-year-old living in New York. “I would’ve loved it had been a more blue collar Jewish New York story. Most of even the wealthiest Jewish families I know come from a background like that, my family included.”</p> <p>“Also, kinda disappointed about the goyische actress when I know from experience that existing in the industry as a Jewish actress is often a strange place in which ‘Jew-y’ Jewish girls always get character roles (not ‘Jewish looking’ Jewish girls), get praised, and given ingenue-type roles,” she continues.<br /><br />Overall, I liked the show. Midge comes off as a trailblazer for female comedians, like how<em> Good Girls Revolt</em> was about trailblazing female journalists. Set in the 1950s, Midge is on stage talking about female sexuality, definitely a taboo back then. Additionally, the show depicts the downfall of the “appropriate” female lifestyle — getting married right out of college and being a stay-at-home mother who never has to lift a finger. In the 1950s, way before divorce was normal and single working mothers were commonplace, Midge considers divorcing her husband. She gets a job at a department store, and still manages to find time to pursue comedy. She defies the “norm” of womanhood at the time. In this way, Midge can be seen as an icon for breaking convention.</p> <p>Yet, for season two (which was already confirmed), I do hope the writers and producers consider getting input from actual Jews — especially Jews who were around in 1950s New York. And maybe, just maybe, they’ll hire actual Jewish actors for new roles on the show.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="font-weight: 400;"><em>* = A pseudonym was used for the last name at the request of the interviewee</em></p> <p><em>Top photo: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel/Amazon</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/193890-the-hotness-december-january-2018.html">BUST's 10 Best Bets For Winter 2017</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/entertainment/193843-week-of-women-november-24-30.html">Week Of Women: November 24-30, 2017</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/18649-gilmore-girls-year-in-the-life.html">"Gilmore Girls: A Year In The Life" — The Good, The Bad, And The WTF</a><span style="font-size: 1rem;"></span></p> Jay Pharaoh On How Comedy Helped Him Survive Depression 2017-12-11T15:01:00-05:00 2017-12-11T15:01:00-05:00 http://bust.com/tv/193925-jay-pharaoh-interview.html BUST Magazine socialmedia@bust.com <p>&nbsp;</p> <h4><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/RROSALES_JAY_PHAROAH-2137AG_b33aa.jpg" alt="RROSALES JAY PHAROAH 2137AG b33aa" class="blog-image" /></h4> <h4>Comedian Jay Pharoah moves on from SNL with his own show, <em>White Famous</em></h4> <p><br />Despite having achieved things by the age of 30 that most comics will only ever dream about—a six-season stint on <em>Saturday Night Live</em> and his own Showtime series, <em>White Famous</em>—Jay Pharoah is one humble dude. That is, until he talks about his famous impressions. “There’s not one I haven’t perfected,” he says proudly of his status as the reigning king of imitation. In fact, long before the Virginia native made a name for himself online by impersonating everyone from Jay-Z to Stewie from <em>Family Guy</em>, Pharoah was using his skills to impress the ladies. “When I was six, I liked this girl named Sara, and I won her over with my impression of Iago from Aladdin,” he says. “She was giggling like crazy. Giggling is always a good sign. But I worked with her at PetSmart when I was 18 and she didn’t remember me. I was like, ‘Was the relationship that bad?’” <br /><br />Pharoah started acting in local theater at eight, but says he lacked confidence due to significant weight gain and struggles with depression. “I looked in the mirror and I hated myself. It felt like shit. I didn’t have a reprieve—everyone said harsh things to me,” Pharoah recalls. “My sister was my one light.”</p> <p>Fortunately, standup comedy became his escape. “I started doing standup at 15 and I got my confidence back,” he says. “I still didn’t go to prom—but I was cool. Depression is very dark and in order to survive it, you have to make light of life. I was lucky to have comedy to exorcise those demons.”</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/RROSALES_JAY_PHAROAH-2220AG_8b166.jpg" alt="RROSALES JAY PHAROAH 2220AG 8b166" class="blog-image" /><br /><br />Now, like Floyd Mooney, the character he plays on <em>White Famous</em>, which premiered in October, Pharoah is a comedian on the verge of another level of stardom. “I definitely see myself in this part,” he says. “Floyd is hot on the underground and wants to cross over. He’s trying not to lose himself. I’m the same way.”<br /><br />So did he start to lose himself at <em>SNL</em>? Pharoah doesn’t like talking about his former employer, and in the past has said in reference to his departure, “You go where you’re appreciated.” But he now calls <em>SNL</em> “comedy boot camp” and says it was a great place to prepare for just about anything.<br /><br />Despite his rising profile, Pharoah insists, “I’m still the same guy I was when I left Virgina.” But at least one thing has changed. During our interview, he fields direct messages on Instagram from a stunning model. “I was told for years, ‘You’re ugly, you’re fat.’ That’s how it was for me. I’m not used to DMs and butt pics,” he confides. “For someone who wasn’t popular in school, it feels like what Chris Rock said about fame. ‘Now you become the hot chick.’”</p> <p><em>By Sabrina Ford</em></p> <p><em>Photographed by Ramona Rosales</em></p> <p><em>Grooming: Christina Guerra; stylist: Charlie Staunton; clothes: Virgil Normal; location courtesy of Virgil Normal + Cereal & Such</em></p> <p><i>This article originally appeared in the December/January 2017 print edition of BUST Magazine.</i><a href="https://subscriptions.bust.com/magazine/signup.php?product_id=11"><i> Subscribe today!</i></a></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193906-broad-city-recap-4-10-friendiversary.html">"Broad City" Recap: Season 4, Episode 10 — "Friendiversary"</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193892-welcome-to-hell-snl.html">Watch Saoirse Ronan And The Women Of SNL Fight Sexual Harassment Through Song</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193851-crazy-ex-girlfriend-girl-interrupted-borderline-personality-disorder.html">"Crazy Ex-Girlfriend," Girl, Interrupted," And How Media Portrays Mental Health</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h4><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/RROSALES_JAY_PHAROAH-2137AG_b33aa.jpg" alt="RROSALES JAY PHAROAH 2137AG b33aa" class="blog-image" /></h4> <h4>Comedian Jay Pharoah moves on from SNL with his own show, <em>White Famous</em></h4> <p><br />Despite having achieved things by the age of 30 that most comics will only ever dream about—a six-season stint on <em>Saturday Night Live</em> and his own Showtime series, <em>White Famous</em>—Jay Pharoah is one humble dude. That is, until he talks about his famous impressions. “There’s not one I haven’t perfected,” he says proudly of his status as the reigning king of imitation. In fact, long before the Virginia native made a name for himself online by impersonating everyone from Jay-Z to Stewie from <em>Family Guy</em>, Pharoah was using his skills to impress the ladies. “When I was six, I liked this girl named Sara, and I won her over with my impression of Iago from Aladdin,” he says. “She was giggling like crazy. Giggling is always a good sign. But I worked with her at PetSmart when I was 18 and she didn’t remember me. I was like, ‘Was the relationship that bad?’” <br /><br />Pharoah started acting in local theater at eight, but says he lacked confidence due to significant weight gain and struggles with depression. “I looked in the mirror and I hated myself. It felt like shit. I didn’t have a reprieve—everyone said harsh things to me,” Pharoah recalls. “My sister was my one light.”</p> <p>Fortunately, standup comedy became his escape. “I started doing standup at 15 and I got my confidence back,” he says. “I still didn’t go to prom—but I was cool. Depression is very dark and in order to survive it, you have to make light of life. I was lucky to have comedy to exorcise those demons.”</p> <p><img src="http://bust.com/images/articles/33833/images/articles/37710/RROSALES_JAY_PHAROAH-2220AG_8b166.jpg" alt="RROSALES JAY PHAROAH 2220AG 8b166" class="blog-image" /><br /><br />Now, like Floyd Mooney, the character he plays on <em>White Famous</em>, which premiered in October, Pharoah is a comedian on the verge of another level of stardom. “I definitely see myself in this part,” he says. “Floyd is hot on the underground and wants to cross over. He’s trying not to lose himself. I’m the same way.”<br /><br />So did he start to lose himself at <em>SNL</em>? Pharoah doesn’t like talking about his former employer, and in the past has said in reference to his departure, “You go where you’re appreciated.” But he now calls <em>SNL</em> “comedy boot camp” and says it was a great place to prepare for just about anything.<br /><br />Despite his rising profile, Pharoah insists, “I’m still the same guy I was when I left Virgina.” But at least one thing has changed. During our interview, he fields direct messages on Instagram from a stunning model. “I was told for years, ‘You’re ugly, you’re fat.’ That’s how it was for me. I’m not used to DMs and butt pics,” he confides. “For someone who wasn’t popular in school, it feels like what Chris Rock said about fame. ‘Now you become the hot chick.’”</p> <p><em>By Sabrina Ford</em></p> <p><em>Photographed by Ramona Rosales</em></p> <p><em>Grooming: Christina Guerra; stylist: Charlie Staunton; clothes: Virgil Normal; location courtesy of Virgil Normal + Cereal & Such</em></p> <p><i>This article originally appeared in the December/January 2017 print edition of BUST Magazine.</i><a href="https://subscriptions.bust.com/magazine/signup.php?product_id=11"><i> Subscribe today!</i></a></p> <p><strong>More from BUST</strong></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193906-broad-city-recap-4-10-friendiversary.html">"Broad City" Recap: Season 4, Episode 10 — "Friendiversary"</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193892-welcome-to-hell-snl.html">Watch Saoirse Ronan And The Women Of SNL Fight Sexual Harassment Through Song</a></p> <p><a href="http://bust.com/tv/193851-crazy-ex-girlfriend-girl-interrupted-borderline-personality-disorder.html">"Crazy Ex-Girlfriend," Girl, Interrupted," And How Media Portrays Mental Health</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>