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When my mom recommended I try Gilmore Girls last year, I decided to give it a shot. Almost immediately, I fell in love with the witty banter, the corny theme song, the heaps and heaps of junk food, but most of all: the undeniable affection between Rory and Lorelai.

It’s rare to see such a healthy relationship between a teenage daughter and her mother on TV. Most shows nowadays are revolved around teenagers sneaking around and lying to their parents, which makes for good entertainment, sure, but I can’t say I really relate. I’m a sixteen-year-old girl and my mom is one of my closest friends. I tell her practically everything, and I value her advice. Rory was the first teenage character I’d seen on TV who could say the same, and there was something extremely comforting in that.

When the Gilmore Girls revival was announced, my mom and I were floored. We watched the original series separately, but now we could come together and see how the Gilmores’ future panned out. We stocked our pantry with Pop Tarts, brownie mix, and lots and lots of coffee (unfortunately, it wasn’t Luke’s coffee, but I guess we can’t have everything).

IMG 1725the author and her mom

On the night the episodes were released on Netflix, we sat together on the couch, and saw our Gilmore Girls for the first time in ages. It was a welcome sight.
Rory and Lorelai haven’t aged a day. Their eyes are just as blue, their smiles just as inviting, their conversations just as charming. My mom and I gawked at Stars Hollow’s decorations during Winter, sighed that Tristan didn’t actually appear in Spring (well, at least I did), freaked out when Jess appeared in Summer (because Team Jess forever, right?), and laughed hysterically at Emily’s meltdown in Fall (BULLSHIT!) We squeezed all four episodes in between work shifts and dog walks throughout the weekend, always making sure we had coffee and sweets prepared (because what’s Gilmore Girls without some calories?).

During car rides, we discussed Rory’s beaus, Lorelai and Luke’s future, and finally: THAT ENDING. Because GOSH was that a frustrating ending.

My mom was the perfect TV buddy. She was always happy to rant with me about Rory’s shenanigans or Lorelai’s troublesome relationship with her mother. She made caramel brownies and stayed up later than her usual bedtime (10:30pm) to finish an episode with me. She was always willing to wait for me to be done with work before watching.

Although I’m still not sure how to feel about that ending, I am so happy Gilmore Girls came back, if only so I could dedicate an entire weekend to spending time with my mom. The coffee, Pop Tarts, and Jess’ beautiful expression as he stared through that window were just an added bonus.

Sidney Wollmuth is technically sixteen years old, but her friends will tell you she's actually an old lady in disguise. She can be found running abnormally upright, fretting over her millions of unfinished drafts, or eating cookie dough ice cream with a small spoon. Her poetry has been recognized by the Scholastic Art and Writing competition and Rookie Mag.

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