Movies

As part of BAMcinématek, BAM (the Brooklyn Academy of Music) has put together a film series called Witches Brew, which will run February 16th through the 29th. This series will mark the release of Robert Eggers’s The Witch. Since witches are symbols for “empowered, unconstrained womanhood,” BUST was excited to team up with BAM for this witchy watch-a-ton. We’re giving away tickets to the showing of Hocus Pocus, Häxan, and The Craft. It's a great opportunity to revisit your old favorite witchy women or discover these fun and freaky films for the first time.
The Coen Brothers are back with Hail, Caesar!, an homage to Old Hollywood. Set around a major Hollywood studio in the 1950s, the film has more plotlines than I can count on both hands, all centered around a busy, stressed-out studio “fixer” Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin) who’s just trying to make it the day without sneaking a cigarette. Here are just a few problems that the fixer has to fix: The studio’s biggest star (George Clooney) goes missing right in the middle of filming a majorly expensive film, Hail, Caesar: A Story Of The Christ (basically a Coen-ified Ben-Hur).
Sundance always finds such wonderfully powerful documentaries, and this year was no exception. There was considerable buzz about many of the docs showing, so I wasn’t surprised when SONITA, a film about a female rapper in conservative Iran, won the World Cinema Jury Prize and Weiner, the unprecedented inside look Anthony Weiner’s fall from grace, won the U.S Grand Jury Prize. It’s exciting that many of these films will be released out into the world soon. Here are a few reviews of documentary films that I was lucky enough to have seen while at Sundance this year.
Dumping toxic significant others and eating great snacks? Sounds like a productive night. In a new short film from Derek Lam that we’re excited to premiere, two ladies dump their other halves in a taxi on Crosby Street while rain pours outside and the smell of pizza fills the air.
Lucrecia Martel grew up in Salta, a northeastern province of Argentina, where her films are now often set. As a child, she planned to become a physicist.“But I started to have doubts about this career path and I enrolled in a series of programs for various careers: zoology, advertising, and art history—all in different provinces of Argentina. I was willing to travel anywhere, but I didn’t know exactly what I would end up studying. Finally, I decided to take a history course in my hometown, and think about what I wanted to do,” Martel said in an interview with BOMB magazine.
Ellie Bamber, Bella Heathcote, Lily James, Millie Brady, and Suki Waterhouse Pride and Prejudice and ZombiesWritten and directed by Burr SteersOut February 5 Almost seven years after Seth Grahame-Smith’s parody novel, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, enjoyed its brief moment in the spotlight, the film adaptation has finally arrived. And the good news is—it’s a lot of fun.
There were over 120 films at Sundance this year. How does one even begin to crack that nut? I watched 21 films in five days and I didn’t even see any of the award-winning films. The good news is these great movies will all be picked up and you will have a chance to see them soon! 1. Christine Driven by a truly remarkable performance by Rebecca Hall, Christine is an exquisitely rendered dramatic look at the life of Christine Chubbuck, a Sarasota newscaster who, after struggling with depression, committed suicide on air during a live broadcast in 1974.
Sundance was loaded with a diverse range of fantastic films this year, and a noticeable theme was the presence of many women filmmakers delivering command performances. With film narrative running on a continuum from anti plot to arc plot, from non-narrative to hyper narrative, clustered together around a point focusing on the cinematic are three great films by three amazing women film directors. If you are looking for lots of plot twists and explosions, its time to move along.
What do hairy palms, blindness and erectile dysfunction have in common? They are all things the kid down the street told you are caused by masturbation. Nicholas Tana and the people behind the year’s most forthcoming documentary, Sticky: A (Self) Love Story, out in the U.S. now, want you to know these are all bold faced lies.
  Once upon a time, Disney never stopped being problematic. Linguists Carmen Fought and Karen Eisenhauer have been working on a study that analyzes the dialogue in Disney movies in order to determine the verbal equality between male and female characters and to determine whether or not it plays a major role in the lives of children who view them. The study has already found that around 70% of all dialogue spoken in most Disney princess movies is by male characters.
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