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> what ever happened to art busties???
girl_logic
post Jul 28 2009, 06:53 AM
Post #1


Hardcore BUSTie
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Whatever happened to art busties?


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There are years that ask questions and years that answer. - zora neale hurston
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vixen_within
post Oct 27 2008, 08:54 PM
Post #2


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From: fair verona/canada


I want to bump this thread, but have nothing to add this day.


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Muffy
post Sep 5 2008, 09:04 PM
Post #3


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From: Rhode Island


mouse, I just talked to someone from the cooperative art gallery that I belong to who told me to stay away from this show. From the links that you sent me it sounds like there is mixed reviews. I was a little skeptical about having to get sponsorship and how I'd have to sell my work at pretty high prices which if I can't sell it at the prices they are at now, how would they sell at higher prices. I too was thinking about things like shipping over seas and how the hell I'd afford to go to Italy!

Good luck with the new computer. I had to buy a newbie about a year ago it was both scary and exciting to see how fast your money can go. I envy you, you being able to have the ability to freelance.. sometimes I'd like to just be able to work for myself. that's awesome, congrats!


Moonpieluv, no prob : )


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mouse
post Sep 5 2008, 11:26 AM
Post #4


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muffy, i found these:

http://dart.fine-art.com/aqd-asp-im_104287-buy-m.htm

http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/blogon/drupal/node/27250

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Biennale

$30-$40 for an entrance fee is one thing...$3,000-$4,000 is quite another, not to mention probably doubling that if you want to actually go to the show, and i think that's probably crucial for getting the recognition that would possibly make the entrance fee worth it. also think about shipping costs, food, lodging...i get the impression it is more of an art fair than a gallery exhibition.

you can apparently apply for sponsorship, but to be quite honest, this seems like something for people who are already selling their artwork for thousands of dollars to go and get a wider audience. i think for artists who are less well known it honestly seems like a little bit of a scam. unless you are accustomed to regularly selling artwork at very high prices, i think it would end up being a money hole. however, this is just my two cents--this is not something i personally would do.

((muffy))


moon; i have an etsy shop but it hasn't had anything in it for like a year. i'm inching closer and closer to quitting my full tim job and starting freelancing/working for myself--i have a ton of ideas bouncing around but no time to execute--i just wish the economy was too. arghhhhhhh. and i need a new computer and that is going to cut into my savings even more. bleh.


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Moonpieluv
post Sep 5 2008, 10:31 AM
Post #5


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Posts: 354
From: barebacking a pink fuzzy unicorn


GT, do you sell your work on Etsy?

For that matter, does any art busties sell on Etsy? or just like in general...

I'm always looking for new art, and I like it best when it comes from friends/busties..them kinda people.

Thanks for sharing your work, Muffy!
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Muffy
post Sep 5 2008, 10:06 AM
Post #6


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From: Rhode Island


mouse, Yeah it does sound impressive. I was in disbelief and still am that I was considered. Its also juried so some people will get some kind of award. Allegedly it doesn't get any funding and the 'registration fee' is to help pay for the space and I assume the award and juror.

I know many art galleries have a fee to submit work, show work or have a juried exhibitions... the fees are to help make money for the gallery, which I understand they need to stay in business. However the fees probably aren't always that bad if you have the dough. Starving artists on the other hand have no way of coughing up an "entry fee" which can run from $10 to $30 or $40. It doesn't even mean you'll get in! I usually just plain avoid the ones that have some kind of fee for the very reason you mentioned, "why should I have to pay you?!" Though I did just agree to do something with my Alma Mata where it costs $10 to exhibit/sell my work at a 'friends and family weekend' that UMASS is having in Oct. I'm kind of excited about it.

girltrouble, here's my site: http://www.geocities.com/superfluousdesigna/


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girltrouble
post Sep 4 2008, 11:45 PM
Post #7


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i'd love to see your work muffy-- my work is about sex and gender too.


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"what a swell farewell party! we said goodbye to everything, including the lining in my stomach." - garvey, from the film, born bad

"That's one career all females have in common, whether we like it or not: being a woman. Sooner or later, we've got to work at it, no matter how many other careers we've had or wanted." --margo channing, all about eve
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mouse
post Sep 4 2008, 09:46 PM
Post #8


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don't know anything about it, sorry muffy. it sounds impressive but imho, i think one should always be wary of things where YOU have to pay THEM. you're the artist....shouldn't THEY be paying YOU?


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Muffy
post Sep 4 2008, 12:29 PM
Post #9


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From: Rhode Island


quick question. I just received an email from the folks that run the Florence Biennale, they are interested in having me participate for the '09 Biennale. It cost a hell of a lot of money, which I've heard other artists complain about, because its hard to get sponsors... anyone know anything else about it: good, bad or otherwise?


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Muffy
post Sep 2 2008, 11:36 AM
Post #10


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From: Rhode Island


take some petrol darling, hah. I just realized your screenname is a sugarcubes song...

I've loved the nurse paintings since I saw them in some art magazine when he first did them. As someone who does work about gender and sexuality its very exciting to see. I agree they are both sexualized and slightly violent. Its the way he painted them with the dripping paint even though some of its white. Its a little like they are melting right off the canvas. Looking at them I kind of think the women are made to look a little like femme fatale - they look deviant. As someone who spent some time in and out of hospitals as an infant, when I got older I hated doctors, nurses and the color green. I wonder if Richard Prince has the same problem. btw, I finally outgrew my loathing of the color green - still am uncertain of doctors...

Sonic Youth actually used a lot of those images, there's more within the cd sleeve. I think they are friends with him, if memory serves me correctly.






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girltrouble
post Aug 28 2008, 12:38 PM
Post #11


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i love kara walker. been a fan of hers for some time. my last name is walker and for a while i went by cara, but that had to change for that reason alone.

as for those nurse paintings--- i LOVE THEM!


--------------------

"what a swell farewell party! we said goodbye to everything, including the lining in my stomach." - garvey, from the film, born bad

"That's one career all females have in common, whether we like it or not: being a woman. Sooner or later, we've got to work at it, no matter how many other careers we've had or wanted." --margo channing, all about eve
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take some petrol...
post Aug 28 2008, 12:19 PM
Post #12


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From: twin cities, minnesota


QUOTE(girltrouble @ Aug 28 2008, 11:47 AM) *
the thing i like about lorna simpson is that she is of that kind of first wave of modern female artist, like jenny holzer. her work is graphic often using words to illustrate points, but above all for me it is a nuanced documentation of the black experience, specifically a female one.


thanks for the links and information, girltrouble! i'm going to take a look into her a bit more, see if i can't find a book about her at our library. i'll be sure to get back to you about what i think.

are you familiar with kara walker? you may find her work interesting as well. we have quite a bit of it here at the walker art center, the same museum that had the richard prince exhibition.




Kara Walker's art takes an irreverent, humorous, goulish, and all-around fantastical look at the underbelly of America's obsessions with race, sex, and violence. Her large black-and-white silhouettes draw from iconography ranging from the pre-Civil War period of America's south, historical romance novels, commercial culture, and slave narratives. Through a "collusion of fact and fiction," she creates a complex reading of history that is at once seductive and terrifying. At first glance, her work appears innocent in its fairytale-like rendering; a closer inspection, however, reveals its many perverse twists and outlandish situations.


on wikipedia
on NPR
some aggregated articles/images about kara walker
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take some petrol...
post Aug 28 2008, 12:09 PM
Post #13


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From: twin cities, minnesota




i'd be curious to hear your reaction to the nurse paintings of richard prince. several of them, including the one somewhat famously used as the cover art for sonic youth's album 'sonic nurse', have been on display at our local modern art museum for the past several months as part of a traveling exhibit on prince. he is notorious for his appropriation of cultural themes and popular images - he's done a series based on the marlboro man that is a pretty interesting exploration of masculinity in advertising, a series where he paints over de kooning reproductions, pieces with cindy sherman, others based on popular fashion advertisements, somewhat tasteless jokes painted on enormous color-blocked canvasses and much more.



i think the nurse paintings are some of his most iconic and they're certainly my favorite of all his cultural appropriations -- prince blew up the covers of '60s pulp novels about nurses on large pieces of canvas and amended them, painting over them and changing the effect of the image dramatically. many look almost violent in nature, with the nurses' lips or throats slashed with a streak of red paint. in 'the nurse of greenmeadow', the one used on the sonic youth album, the nurse looks like she is clutching her bleeding throat. (on the album version, this image is visibly toned down - what appears to be a bleeding wound on the original prince painting is painted over with the novel cover's original flowers.) i left the exhibit with two very different readings of the paintings. the images are, like most of prince's work, celebratory and denigrating all in one. they are so large that they are dominating, almost uncomfortable to be near. in my opinion, the women in the paintings are hypersexualized, their heavily mascaraed eyes peeking over the tops of their surgical masks which cover their noses and mouths like some kind of veil, the kind you see in those popular romanticized 19th century romanticized paintings of harems and odalisques that are now considered heavily orientalist (and rightly so.) i could see the images being perceived as both a condemnation of this kind of sexualization and/or an exploration of it's supposed 'okayness' and pervasiveness of the cultural stigma that is applied to women in the workplace every day. i still like the paintings, but it's interesting to think about what could be behind them.

as an aside, all the text on the paintings is original. they are the titles of the novels.



i took a film class last fall where my professor, a very wise and wonderful women, accused the current younger generation (and our culture at large) of being obsessed with 'violence pornography'. do you see these paintings as a kind of violence pornography, glorifying and sexualizing the perceived abuse the nurses in these paintings seem to have suffered? or is it a comment on the cultural perception and accurate realities of nursing itself? this isn't, of course, the first time such correlations between what was once solely perceived as 'women's work' and sexuality has been drawn. is prince trying to comment on the time period that these images were originally produced and distributed as covers of dime-store novels? is he modernizing the images or painting some kind of internalized fantasy? or, is it something else entirely? does it have more to do with a woman's power in her sexuality rather than the cultural expectation or perception of female sexuality? do these images exoticize or celebrate?



they are really fascinating paintings, like most of richard prince's work. these just particularly resonate with me. i couldn't stop talking about them or thinking about them for at least a week. i know there are a great number of articles on the paintings online but i have only bothered to read one or two, preferring to draw my own conclusions rather than read the snappy remarks of a columnist. but that aside, really, i want to hear anything and everything you have to say about the paintings - as people who appreciate art, who are interested in women's issues, from whatever perspective or background you are coming from.

sorry this was a bit image heavy, but in the context of the discussion, it goes without saying that it's important to see the paintings. wink.gif
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girltrouble
post Aug 28 2008, 11:47 AM
Post #14


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the thing i like about lorna simpson is that she is of that kind of first wave of modern female artist, like jenny holzer. her work is graphic often using words to illustrate points, but above all for me it is a nuanced documentation of the black experience, specifically a female one. probably the best think i can recommend with any fine artist (as opposed to an illustrator or designer) is to bone up on who they are, and what they are about. what are the concerns of their work? it kind of helps to know what you are looking at. but from there you can just look at her work. wink.gif



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"what a swell farewell party! we said goodbye to everything, including the lining in my stomach." - garvey, from the film, born bad

"That's one career all females have in common, whether we like it or not: being a woman. Sooner or later, we've got to work at it, no matter how many other careers we've had or wanted." --margo channing, all about eve
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take some petrol...
post Aug 28 2008, 11:32 AM
Post #15


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From: twin cities, minnesota


i'm not familiar with lorna simpson, girltrouble - is there any place you'd recommend starting? i mean, any particular body/era/piece of work by her? if it gives you such a gut reaction, it's gotta be good.
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girltrouble
post Aug 28 2008, 11:28 AM
Post #16


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i meant to post that i love lorna simpson too, vixen. i saw her work at an exhibition where she was paired with basquiat-- it literally changed my life. at one point i was crying. i had never before been effected by art in that way. to this day it is a touchstone to me, and i try (and fail) to make art that is made to be seen live. to make something that effects physically. i'm not there yet, but someday...


ETA: thanks for the link to j.coffee, too, QB, i'm heading in that direction (paper art, not pinup) with my work next year, and i like seeing what's out there so i don't copy and do something different. smile.gif

he looks like he might be influenced by shane glines or bruce timm i used to subscribe to gline's site cartoon retro-- it used to have an amazing forum where people would scan/post some of the amazing retroish or actually retro cartoons they'd found from all over the world. the best stuff, for me atleast was some of the stuff from the 30's. it was almost calligraphic. unfortunately he felt it was over run with spam and he switched to a different forum losing all the work that had been so meticulously documented.


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"what a swell farewell party! we said goodbye to everything, including the lining in my stomach." - garvey, from the film, born bad

"That's one career all females have in common, whether we like it or not: being a woman. Sooner or later, we've got to work at it, no matter how many other careers we've had or wanted." --margo channing, all about eve
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take some petrol...
post Aug 28 2008, 11:26 AM
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From: twin cities, minnesota


thanks, queen bull! i'm glad you enjoyed the harry clarke -- you should look at some more of his images online. what sets him apart from beardsley, i think, is that while they were both masters of the finely detailed pen-and-ink illustrations, clarke's figures possess a certain form and grace that beardsley's never quite did. perhaps if beardsley hadn't passed away so young, he would have developed in a way similar to clarke. (this is not to say that beardsley is without his virtues. i love beardsley.)

i like that fella's stuff too, the link you posted to DA - it's mod without being cloying or overdone. REALLY cute!!! i agree, browsing deviantart is a great way to find new artists.

one artist who i found in a similar way in about 2000 is johanna ost - a swedish girl only a couple of years older than myself who makes really lovely fairytale and circus pictures.



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Queen Bull
post Aug 28 2008, 11:03 AM
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WOW. Petrol Darling, i love that first piece by harry Clarke. the detail is AMAZING.

I really like lesser known artists and photographers. I usually jsut find them when i am browsing around Deviant Art. I love that site, I have found so many of my favorite artists there.

I really like this guys work. Its All cutouts in a classic pinup girl style. So cute.



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take some petrol...
post Aug 28 2008, 10:55 AM
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From: twin cities, minnesota


the past few years i have been really interested in what's called the golden age of illustration (1880s through the late 1920s or so). i particularly like aubrey beardsley - who you are likely familiar with because of his (for the time) oft-shocking illustrations and connections to oscar wilde amongst other things - but there are others who worked in a similar style who are more than worth pursuing.

harry clarke, irish illustrator and stained-glass maker. unfortunately draws many comparisons to beardsley, which means he's gotten a bit overshadowed/become a bit underappreciated. he illustrated for some works of edgar allan poe and hans christian andersen. he is most famous for his countless beautiful stained glass works, many of which can be seen in ireland. i think his work in stained glass is some of the most beautiful and dynamic i've ever seen.






kay nielsen, danish illustrator who illustrated many fairytales and grimm stories. he also briefly worked for disney in the 1930s - he did some work on 'fantasia'.



there are so many others, but those two are my particular favorite. the golden age of illustration wasn't indicative of any one style - john tenneil, for instance, who illustrated the 'alice' stories, would be considered part of this age, but his work draws little comparison to clarke and nielsen.






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Muffy
post Aug 25 2008, 08:31 PM
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From: Rhode Island


vixen, its funny you asked I was just talking about this same thing with a friend who likes to do collage work and a local gallery director. Quite frankly, you need permission though many artists do it without. I have heard that if you alter it its okay, but according to this gallery director, there's still that fine line there and she said, if your selling it "just don't get caught." l know people who use copyrighted images within their art, that they sell, and I have as well. I once sold a painting I had done of a dollar bill (for a lot more than a dollar).


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