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> It's Not That Easy Being Green
pepper
post May 16 2010, 03:30 PM
Post #21







That was very difficult to read and the summary too general. How to decifer these things? Gah.

Protect people from salmonella on veggies or from dirty meat handling? There is a BIG difference. Dealing with it at the source, contamination from farm feces run off and improper food handling, or using it as an excuse to irradiate the hell out of everything including fresh produce.

They tried to slip one by us here in Canada recently, a reclassification of natural health products as controlled substances for our "protection". I don't have to wonder too hard who's behind that action. Thankfully people made enough noise about that it's been tabled for now.
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stargazer
post May 16 2010, 08:54 AM
Post #22


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Pepper, the articles I found online really freaked me out. So, I did some online tracking and found this article which makes S 510 Bill available to read.

I found out that Sen. Durbin is the sponsor of the Food and Safety Bill. If memory serves me, I think Sen Durbin's reasons for working on this act is to make the FDA responsible to protect Americans from the outbreak of salmonella, etc, especially after the movie Food Inc.


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pepper
post May 16 2010, 08:22 AM
Post #23







I hope to high heaven that this senate bill isn't for real. It's looking to make it against the law to grow, eat, share or sell your own produce. WTF, that's only slightly terrifying.
http://www.topix.com/forum/city/paintsvill...04QDO2GRRBGG3DT
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pepper
post May 15 2010, 06:02 PM
Post #24







Oh, I hope you will! It really is as easy as it seems. I can't believe it took me so long to finally try it out but once I did I never went back. How did I afford that pricey soap before? For less than $20 I've got enough raw material to make laundry soap for the next 2 years at least!
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ketto
post May 15 2010, 11:00 AM
Post #25


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Thanks Pepper! We have two jugs to get through but I'm going to do this the next time we run out.


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pepper
post May 14 2010, 04:04 PM
Post #26







*blush*
I hope a ton of people will be thinking about me every time they put on their nice clean clothes. (or take off the dirty ones, heh)
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stargazer
post May 14 2010, 03:49 PM
Post #27


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Thanks for the recipe, pepper! You are amazingly crafty. I have a craft crush on you. smile.gif


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"I'm not impressed easily. Wow! A blue car!"-Homer Simpson
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pepper
post May 14 2010, 07:21 AM
Post #28







Tutorial for making your own laundry soap. It's darn easy and the savings is astronomical!
Please let me know if anything isn't clear and I'll fix it.
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koffeewitch
post Dec 11 2009, 10:08 AM
Post #29


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http://www.storyofstuff.com/

Ketto, you've got to watch The Story of Stuff; you'll love it. It talks about how products are made to fall apart and be replaced. They study to see how quickly a product can break but still retain brand loyalty in the buyer. The environmental consequences of all our "stuff" are dismal.


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"The U.S. is the only nation on Earth to pass from barbarism into decadence without once passing through an era of civilization."
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ketto
post Dec 11 2009, 10:02 AM
Post #30


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Paperboy and I are trying to live green now that we have our own place. I was really torn up about not composting but I was convinced it would be too smelly in an apt with no outside space. Then I realized I could get a bit tupperware container and keep it in the freezer. No smell, no bugs, and I just use compostable bags and bring them to my folks place.

I came up with that a couple of weeks ago and our garbage has decreased significantly. I'm also a crazy recycler. I make sure paperboy remembers to even throw the toilet paper roll in the recycling bin.

My mom gave us some napkins too so we're using about 1 roll of paper towel a month. I'm very happy with that.

It's crazy how fast plastic bags add up though. I recently heard that a few grocery stores in the area will recycle plastic bags from any stores so when I have too many to do anything with I'm planning to bring them there from now on too.


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koffeewitch
post Dec 11 2009, 09:16 AM
Post #31


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Here's a short video on why the cap and trade system just doesn't work. It increases carbon emissions and makes wealthy polluters even wealthier.
http://www.naturemoms.com/blog/2009/12/08/...-cap-and-trade/


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koffeewitch
post Sep 24 2009, 09:17 AM
Post #32


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ketto, your mom really rocks...I make SOME of our family's clothes; and I can usually re-construct thrift clothes to fit better/ look better, but I'd love to be able to do more.


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"The U.S. is the only nation on Earth to pass from barbarism into decadence without once passing through an era of civilization."
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ketto
post Sep 23 2009, 10:28 AM
Post #33


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I've been thinking about getting a hold of some re-usable veggie bags for a while. I like the ones on etsy, I'll have to sew some up.

My mom was getting really fed up with the amount of paper towel being used in our house so she cut up a bunch of tea towels and made about 30 cloth napkins. Now it takes forever to go through the paper towel and I much prefer the cloth anyway.

When I buy veggies, I usually grab the paper mushroom bags and put all my fruits and veggies in them. At home we use the paper bags for garlic sausage, fruits, veggies. Everything keeps a lot longer when it's not in plastic. Then we just use the old paper bags in the fire place, but cloth bags would be nice so we're not wasting as much paper.

I can't believe how wasteful people are with kids clothes too. My mom used to make a large proportion of our clothes when we were young. Now she constantly adjusts my nieces clothing. Takes out pants and shirts, adds extra fabric to the bottom of pants she's outgrown. Makes one of her old shirts into a dress or nightgown.


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koffeewitch
post Sep 22 2009, 11:24 AM
Post #34


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Hell, kids clothes are so expensive and outgrown so fast, I only buy them second hand. My neighborhood is so poor it's even more distressing to see people throw kids clothes away. If you can't cut them down to fit a younger child, or donate them to goodwill, or make a t-shirt quilt out of them then atleast place them BESIDE the freakin' dumpster for other people to take and NOT in the bottom yucky area of the dumpster where they get stained up and mildewed and become unsalvagable for anybody...


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pepper
post Sep 22 2009, 10:59 AM
Post #35







Kids Clothes?! You have Got to be kidding me! Holy Maude, those things are so expensive, how could anyone bear to put them into the trash! I am flabbergasted.

Ok...

I've got a roll of paper towels here now too. I never used to buy them but I line the kitchen compost container with one folded up so that food doesn't get glued to the bottom. I mix it in with the compost outside when I dump it. I guess I could use newspaper but I don't get the newspaper so I'd have to scrounge it from somewhere. I might just start putting some shredded junk mail into the bottom instead, a small amount of that is fine in compost.
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koffeewitch
post Sep 22 2009, 10:55 AM
Post #36


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I know, it blows my mind that people throw out fabric, too...but start looking in dumpsters near apartment buildings and you will see it for yourself. I can not believe what people throw away...especially kids clothes.
Just a generation or so ago, every household had a rag bag and EVERY scrap was saved as something potentially useful and precious. But now we have PAPER TOWELS, so nobody uses rags anymore. I admit it, I DO keep paper towels in my house and I go through (maybe) a roll or two per year. They are good for vomit and overflowing toilet messes, etc. The really gross stuff.


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pepper
post Sep 22 2009, 10:43 AM
Post #37







People *throw out* Fabric?!? I have never even imagined such a thing. Wow. There are just so many uses from restitching to donation to rag tearing for home use or factories that make rags. A lot of second hand stores send clothes that can't be resold here to third world countries or rag factories depending on the condition. I would never throw out fabric. You know how I am about craft supplies though, I never throw out Anything!

Ok, these bags I wanted to make are out of the plastic you can get at hardware stores for table cloths and such, it's on a roll and comes in different grades but... I'm not sure it's safe for food storage. I did make up some unbleached cotton sackies years ago and they worked fine, just maybe need some kind of label so you know what's in them. Spritzing them with water actually helps keep things crisper in the fridge than sealed in plastic anyhow, so long as they don't freeze in a too-cold fridge!

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koffeewitch
post Sep 22 2009, 08:04 AM
Post #38


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Persiflager: those bags are so cute...I bring my own bags to the store, but I, too, need something for my veggies. It's inexcusable that I haven't sewn up my own, why else do I have that uber over-priced Viking machine sitting around for?!

My best excuse for my plastic baggies is that I re-use them for cleaning out kitty litter pans. Since there is now flushable/bioD cat litter on the market it's not a very good excuse.

In Ecologist magazine last year, I read a stat about how many POUNDS of fabric each american throws in the trash every year. It was unbelievable; I wish I remembered the exact stat, but it was like 50 lbs of clothes, blankets, etc. per household. Can you guys even imagine how many bags, quilts, baby sleepers, pillows, etc. could be made from all that used fabric goodness people just pitch in the trash?


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Persiflager
post Sep 22 2009, 12:37 AM
Post #39


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Ooh, I bought some great re-washable mesh vegetable bags! They live in my bike panniers and get used all the time.

I can't find the ones I bought but these (on etsy) look good.


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“Logic is the art of going wrong with confidence.”
Morris Kline (mathematician, author) 1908-1992
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pepper
post Sep 21 2009, 09:30 PM
Post #40







Thats' like my idea to make some sort of washable clear plastic baggie type thing for buying groceries with, I think about it but never do it. I end up throwing out so many of those flimsy bags they have for tomatoes and fruit and the like, it's tragic. I bring my own shopping bags or take a box but end up with all this plastic anyhow, sheesh, how to get away from it all?
Get off my butt and stitch up the suckers, that's how! One day dry.gif .
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