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In case you were depraved of fairy tales as a child, Excalibur’s legend is an exciting story of a sword thrown into a lake, caught by the Lady of the Lake for safekeeping, and can only be wielded by the rightful sovereign of Great Britain, AKA 7-year-old Matilda Jones of Norton, Doncaster.

The noble Matilda had only recently heard the legend of her royal future when her father told her and her 4-year-old sister Lois the tale of Excalibur earlier that day. Later, when they went swimming by Dozmary Pool in Bodmin Moor, Cornwall, Matilda hadn’t even gotten her hair wet when fate intervened. In barely waist-deep water, the almighty Matilda discovered this 4-foot-long sword at the bottom of the lake, which clearly makes her the next queenly sovereign.

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Nay-sayers claim the sword is only 20-30 years old, making it extremely unlikely to be Excalibur. Her father even dares to doubt it’s a real sword, telling The Star he thinks it’s an old film prop – uh yeah, if by “film” you mean historically accurate legend of Excalibur’s sword!

Hopefully, the Honorable Matilda will have a long and righteous rein, and maybe even let her little sister hold the sword once or twice.

First Photo from Sword in the Stone 

Second Photo from @SheffieldStar  

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