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While reading the March/April issue of “Lego Club” little girls everywhere will finally be able to answer one of life’s most pressing questions: What haircut looks best with my face shape? It’s obvious that Lego was simply trying to HELP their five-to-twelve-year-old audience solve a baffling beauty conundrum. Because WHY ELSE would Lego need to create Lego ladies—who, by the way, are not shaped like blocks, but instead like slender teens (who happen to have mad mascara applying skills).

Also file under: Barf.

While we one-hand clapped when the company created an all-female scientist set in 2014, it's super disappointing that the toy manufacturer decided it had to attract buyers away from Barbie by creating Lego Friends. The gang consists of—you guessed it—five "diverse" girls who each have a special talent (one is a vet tech, another is a soccer player). These are the gals handing out beauty tips like "the best haircut for your face" in the company's magazine. 

We won’t too get too brutal about this faux pas: It's clear the company is trying to stay relevant with a wide range of potential kiddo consumers, and everybody stumbles from time to time. But frankly, Lego had it right in the '80s when it ran the below ad of a little girl at play with the bright blocks. "What it is is beautiful," the copy reads—regardless of what its hair and face shape look like. Now that's advice we can get on board with.

Images c/o LEGO and Lego Club Magazine