Category » Artsy
  I once met a female construction worker. When discussing her job, she actually teared up. Not only is she paid less than her male peers because she physically cannot lift as much as many of them can, but she also faces sexual harassment on a daily basis; she is called “weak” and “a little girl,” and she hid the fact that she was gay for fear of bullying.    The artist Susan Eisenberg’s “On Equal Terms,” a ... Read More
  In 1865, Mark Twain wrote a picture book entitled “Advice To Little Girls.” The book is delightfully illustrated by Vladimir Radunsky, who whimsically juxtaposes doodles that you might expect in a child’s diary with rich watercolor-esque renderings of the human form. Infused with this sketchbook-inspired world, are powerful and progressive life lessons for girls.      Twain’s text suggests that although children ... Read More
  Renowned author and essayist William T Vollmann commits to his protagonists. In the case of his most recent heroine, Dolores of The Book of Dolores, he tried to live as a woman. Dolores is a transgender prostitute who interests include jewelry and geology. She is a housewife who often dons a black and red corset. She carries a whip into the bedroom. As accurately and earnestly as possible, Vollmann transformed himself into the female character in ... Read More
Cataloguing one’s first sexual encounter is nothing new. As a teen who pored over magazines in airports, I traced the ongoing debate on what “virginity” means. At what point are we no longer virgins: oral sex, intercourse? Do the rules change depending on one’s gender or sexual orientation? I learned that it’s kind of one of those things an individual must define for her or hir or himself.   And we always want to record it in ... Read More
If you search the phrase "Am I pretty or ugly?" on YouTube, you will receive "About 556,000" results. The video stills all feature young girls sitting alone in front of the camera. Descriptions all read along the lines of "Please tell me in comments," "I am so ugly," and "Be truthful please tell me." The thousands and thousands of videos reveal a sort of strange subculture of girls talking about school, boys, and of course, their appearance...to the entire ... Read More
With less than seven days left for Banksy’s New York City residency, titled “Better Out Than In,” the British street artist still has admirers and dissenters, more or less, on the edge of their seats, and NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg mostly frustrated. Each day in October has welcomed a new work on the streets of the Big Apple, varying from classic Banksy mischief to insightful mobile and kinetic works that could have easily been mislabeled as ... Read More
Yesterday, at the age of 76, Massachusetts-born photographer Deborah Turbeville passed away after an eight-month struggle with lung cancer. She was listening to Rachmaninoff on her iPod.  Though she was known as a "fashion photographer" she considered herself anything but. “The photographs were for fashion," she once told The Independent. "But at the same time they had an ulterior motive, something more to do with the world in ... Read More
  Fashion photographer Billy Kidd is used to the airbrushed, youthful aesthetic of editorial work, but his personal fine-art work isn’t what you might expect. In Transience, his upcoming solo show at Masters & Pelavin Gallery, he aims to challenge the way we think about beauty, womanhood, and age. He tells New York’s Julie Ma, "Life changes, beauty changes. That’s what I want to say here. Beauty isn’t always a constant. It’s not always one ... Read More
Ana Casas Broda, "Kinderwunsch (Ana Playroom V)," from the Playroom series 2010. Photography, as a medium, is inextricably bound to the idea of motherhood. We see mothers (and fathers) everywhere snapping pictures of their infants. Art critic Roland Barthes rooted his discussion of the emotional power of photographs in an image he found of his mother after her death. Photography gives us a means of capturing something we know will soon be lost: the ... Read More
For years, archaeologists have believed the first cave-paintings to be composed predominantly by men. "There has been a male bias in the literature for a long time," says archaeologist Dean Snow. But now, new research has the field thinking it was women who were behind the art all along.  The aforementioned homie Dean Snow recently studied the outlines of handprints found in French and Spanish cave art. By analyzing the lengths of the fingers, Snow concluded ... Read More
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