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Zombies create a wonderful commentary on society, survival, and our mortality because they appeal to our fears of widespread viruses, and how much potential we have as individuals in a society to combat a widespread infection (cough Ebola cough). All of the following movies mentioned fall mostly into the typical Hollywood zombie movie premise, meaning it involves a virus. This list of zombie movie queens contain strong, independent, in control… oh, and deadly (and sometimes undead) ladies. Enjoy. Read More
Mike Tyson is getting a new TV show. Why? Because, as he recently told USA Today, he “didn’t have nothing better to do.” The new animated series “Mike Tyson Mysteries” premiered last night on Adult Swim. The show is a cartoon series that heavily resembles the style of Scooby-Doo, and focuses on Tyson along with a slew of other characters, including a crude and alcoholic pigeon, solving mysteries. Read More
For women, there is a science and an art to surviving horror films (Carol J. Clover’s 1992 Men, Women, and Chainsaws can be your textbook). One must be curious and observant -- you heed the subtle whiff of danger when others don’t notice the stench. One must also be intelligent, resourceful, and scrappy regardless of stature. It definitely helps to be sexually reserved and to have a gender-neutral name. If you can successfully embody all of these qualities, you might stand a chance at facing the chainsaw and becoming the Final Girl. Read More
  Spoiler alert: This Saturday Night Live skit rests on the crutch of a fat joke. And a race joke. And another fat joke. But beyond the crude and crass (and actually not funny) one-liners, Kate McKinnon and SNL guest star Jim Carrey’s Sia “Chandelier” dance-off is sort of redeeming. (Is it too late to steal their costume idea?)  In case you missed it, here is Lena Dunham's own "Chandelier" dance from Late Night with Seth Myers earlier in they year. Read More
The trailer for “Happy Valley,” the documentary focusing on Jerry Sandusky, Joe Paterno and the sexual molestation cover-up that occurred at Penn State, came out earlier this week.   Amir Bar Lev, the director best known for “The Tillman Story,” hopes that the film “provokes people to ask themselves questions about their own pantheon of saints and heroes and villains.” The film, set for release on Nov. 19, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, and won the Best Documentary Feature at the Sarasota Film Festival. Read More