Category » Feminism
  Like most progressive feminists, I celebrated the moment during the congressional testimony of Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards when the particularly smug House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, produced an entirely slanted, politicized graph which he claimed he manufactured based on Planned Parenthood’s actual number of abortions. Ms. Read More
  Earlier this week, I was carrying a giant bag of dirty clothes to my local laundromat, dressed in my least-filthy shorts and oversize T-shirt when I heard it: “HEY, BABY! NICE LEGS!” *Disgusting kissing noises* I live in Brooklyn and walk everywhere, so this is a sound I hear literally Every. Single. Day. But something about this incident was different: the voice was so much higher than any catcall I’ve ever heard before. Something was off about this particular moment of street harassment. Read More
  Chrissie Hynde is still defending the victim blaming comments she made after there release of her memoir Reckless, only this time she has added a sprinkle of racism on top. Hynde, the iconic front-woman of The Pretenders, was fairly defensive and rude during her interview yesterday morning with NPR's David Greene.  Greene asked Hynde to describe some of the experiences she wrote about in her book–like the time she was assaulted by a group of bikers and proceeded to take responsibility for it. Read More
  Instagram loves the nipples, guys. Loves them. Instagram would totally be a tidal wave of feminist change were it not for the true villains of the piece: Apple. According to the Business Insider, Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom recently announced that Instagram has no choice but to ban female nipples to keep it below an NC-17 rating in the Apple store, which forbids sexually explicit content. Nobody is really buying this argument, considering the Apple store has not removed Twitter,  which only disallows “graphic content” in profile and header photos. Read More
“Leave her on the hillside to die, she’s only a girl,” the waiters at her father’s restaurant would taunt anytime she cried as a child. Civil rights activist and feminist Grace Lee Boggs recalled these incidents in an interview with Democracy Now, citing them as the first time she realized the world was different for girls and boys. Looking back, she mused that it may have been in jest but, nevertheless, it was these careless statements that made her realize the world needed change. Read More