Category » Feminism
The phrase “queen bee” brings to mind Regina George, Heather Chandler, Cher Horowitz, even Miranda Priestly—ladies in charge. The term has also been used to describe a syndrome of top professional women keeping other women out of senior positions—something that's (surprise!) a myth, according to new research from Columbia Business School. Read More
We all know that actors, authors, and, of course, models are Photoshopped relentlessly in the media—but even politicians aren’t safe from alterations. Australian Senator Sarah Hanson-Young won a case for defamation against a satirical magazine called Zoo Weekly this past week for that very reason. In response to her strong views that those seeking asylum should have a place in Australia, Zoo Weekly thought it would be clever to offer that refugees could stay in their magazine office—if she agreed to a bikini photo shoot. Read More
At the University of California, San Francisco, women will now be able to get over-the-counter hormonal birth control (the options are the pill, the patch, or the ring) at the Walgreens pharmacy on campus. This development is part of SB 493, a 2013 California law allowing pharmacists to prescribe hormonal contraception. Beyond contraception, pharmacists will be able to administer some vaccinations, order lab tests, and prescribe some other medications. The idea is to make basic healthcare more accessible to patients, which—all in all—sounds great to us. Read More
  The average American woman uses more than 16,000 tampons in her lifetime, yet the history behind our cotton comrades remains a mystery to many.  The commercial tampon as we know it today is actually a significant cultural artifact and a feat of technical engineering that has been shaped by many invisible forces throughout time.  The Atlantic dove into the long and fraught history of these small wonders. Here are a few surprising facts. 1. Read More
Women’s Media Center’s fourth edition of The Status of Women in U.S. Media highlights how all platforms of media are failing women. In particular, film and television continue to let down women. The number of women involved behind the camera in movies has stayed fairly static. Women make up only 17 percent of all directors, cinematographers, writers, editors, executive producers and producers from the top 250 movies from the United States in 2014. This is up one percent from 2013, but is equal to the amount of women behind the camera in 1998 and a decrease from 2001. Read More
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