Category » Movies
You’ll likely feel a sense of deja vu while watching Bare, the debut feature film from director Natalia Leite. There are shades of movies from What’s Eating Gilbert Grape to Blue Is The Warmest Color to Coyote Ugly, but Bare spans genres: it’s part coming-of-age story, part family drama, part LGBT romance. Though you’ll recognize familiar tropes, Leite’s direction and Dianna Agron’s performance mean that Bare is interesting in a way that feels new. Read More
Comedian Sarah Silverman shows her dramatic side in I Smile Back, a dark suburban drama about addiction and mental illness. Silverman’s character, Laney, is living a seemingly perfect life as a housewife and mother of two. But beneath the surface, she’s addicted to drugs, booze, and sex: an early scene shows her sleeping with her husband’s friend, doing coke, and then going to pick her kids up from school. After a binge leads to a collapse, she reluctantly goes to rehab. Read More
Agnès Varda and Jane Birkin in Jane B. par Agnès V. “The mystery of distribution is incredible,” 87-year-old French director and film legend Agnès Varda says on the phone from her hotel room in Chicago. She’s speaking of her two films created in close collaboration with Jane Birkin, Jane B. par Agnes V. and Kung-Fu Master. The films, now restored, are being shown in the United States at New York’s Lincoln Plaza Cinema for one week only, October 16-22. Read More
Olga Kurylenko is done with being “the girl.” The 35-year-old French actress - best known for playing Bond girl Camille Montes in 2008’s Quantum Of Solace - takes the lead in the new action movie Momentum, out today. Momentum, directed by Stephen S. Campanelli, will appeal to fans of Alias, Nikita and other badass spy/action/heist movies and TV series. Kurylenko plays the mysterious Alex, an “infiltration expert” with her eye on some diamonds who gets caught in the middle of a dangerous government conspiracy. Read More
Wildlike, an indie film directed and written by Frank Hall Green, was a thoughtful look into the experience of a teenage victim of sexual assault. It had good intentions, iffy acting, a slow rhythm and most of all–desperately needed a trigger warning. Basic criticism aside, the film takes a new angle on displaying the point of view of a survivor of sexual assault. If it is one thing Mackenzie (Ella Purnell) is, it's a survivor. Moving in with her uncle (Brian Geraghty) in Alaska, Mackenzie's future is at first seemingly full of opportunity. Read More