Category » General
Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR), an NYC-based media watch organization, recently conducted its third study on the diversity of commentators on NPR. NPR is known as a liberal/intellectual media haven, so its lack of diversity is particularly disappointing—especially because NPR’s strategic plan includes an impending goal of featuring “stories at the intersection of race, ethnicity, and culture.” That’s pretty hard to do accurately with all white dudes as contributors. Read More
A study conducted by The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics has found that black borrowers on average pay 29 basis points more - that’s about .3% more - than comparable white borrowers. Black women suffer the most from this disparity, receiving this different treatment more than black men do. The study was conducted using data from three waves of the U.S. Survey of Consumer Finance. This wasn’t just a fluke. If you were wondering what a small .3% difference is in dollar terms, Quartz spelled it out for us. Read More
The Birkin bag by Hermès was designed for Jane Birkin in 1984, who complained to the then-president Jean-Louis Dumas that she couldn’t find a bag that was both stylish and practical. He designed one for her, calling it the Birkin bag. The bag comes in numerous styles, but one of its most popular variations is made from crocodile skin, and costs at least $36,000. Recently, PETA has uncovered the cruel process Hermes puts alligators and crocodiles through to get the material for their luxury bags. Read More
And here I thought I was just an asshole. Research from Harvard Business school suggests that sarcasm may improve the creativity and cognitive functioning of both the giver and receiver, and their findings were published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. The research found that, while sarcasm could screw you over (so if you don’t think your coworker gets it, you should probably go easy on them), it also stimulates creativity. That’s because sarcasm activates abstract thinking. Read More
The empty chair sits next to the 35th woman in a recent New York Magazine project shedding light on Bill Cosby’s sexual assaults. Although the front-facing, emotionless women send a powerful message, the empty chair speaks louder than all of their words combined. It symbolizes the 11 women who accused Cosby of assault, but did not allow their photo to be captured for the project – even worse, it symbolizes the numerous other women who may have been assaulted and have yet to come forth. Read More