Category » General
Kelly Gissendaner, Georgia’s only female inmate on death row, once again found her execution postponed late Monday night due to a problem with the lethal-injection drugs.   This marks the second delay for Gissendaner, whose original execution was scheduled for February 25th, but was similarly deferred due to a winter storm. The Pardons and Paroles board denied her lawyers’ request for clemency last week, but has yet to announce the new date and time. Only 16 women have been put to death since the Supreme Court ruled in favor of capital punishment in 1976. Read More
  To say women of color are underrepresented in science and tech fields is a gross understatement. Black women fill just three percent of computing jobs in the U.S. And according to a recent study, despite expressing interest in STEM fields in higher numbers, black women are less likely than their white counterparts to obtain degrees in those fields. Read More
The Phenomenal Woman rises again. While Maya Angelou left us last year, her influence and greatness has not been forgotten. Actress, poet, novelist, trailblazer, survivor, and Civil Rights activist, Ms. Angelou was a true inspiration. In recognition of this American legend, the United States Postal Service will be issuing a Forever stamp honoring her. “Maya Angelou inspired our nation through a life of advocacy and through her many contributions to the written and spoken word,” said Postmaster General Megan J. Brennan. Read More
A 19-year-old male college student cited "Fifty Shades of Grey" when he was charged with sexually assaulting a 19-year-old female student. Mohammad Hossain, a freshman at the University of Illinois at Chicago, appeared dumbfounded when a judge set his bail at $500,000 and sent him back into lockup. Hossain is otherwise known as a star student, involved in several UIC leadership programs, student ambassador to the alumni association, and on the triathlon team. Read More
Women have been contributing to military efforts since the military was a thing. During the Revolutionary War women cut off their hair, bound their breasts and joined in the fight - always with the fear of being found out. In Civil War they would enlist under male names; some would transport messages and battle plans in hollowed-out turnips. There are currently 1,853,690 female veterans out in the world. With that historical background of women kicking ass, you'd think there would be parades for them on Veterans' Day. Read More
Did you shrink your favorite wool sweater? Dry your eyes; there may be hope for that sad little guy. With some baby shampoo, a hand steamer, a little cardboard, a few binder clips, and some elbow grease, you can loosen up the fibers enough to stretch the sweater back into shape. Not all sweaters can be saved—if it has become completely felted, then there may be no hope. However, if it just shriveled up so the arms are half of what they used to be and it’s now a belly sweater, you can give this technique a go. Read More
  Barbie is now accessorizing with a cute clutch, small computer, stilettos...and Wifi hardware? Matel has created a new Barbie that can intelligently respond to its owner’s voice. Think Siri from your iPhone, but packed into a disproportionate doll wielded by small children with formative brains. It works by processing the child's voice and sending it through the internet to create a response. Then, at the end of the day the guardian of the child can (optionally) receive an e-mail with the day's conversational highlights. Read More
Today marks the swearing-in of Kate Brown (D), the first openly bisexual governor in America. Following incumbent John Kitzhaber's resignation, Brown will become Oregon's 37th governor, and likely one of its most memorable.  Oregon's first female governor, Barbara Roberts, was with her at the Oregon Historical Society on Saturday to celebrate the state's 156th birthday.  As of yet, it's unclear who is to be part of Brown's staff, or what policies she might introduce, but it is very exciting that a bisexual woman will be at the forefront of a fairly open state. Read More
This past New Year’s Eve, a 14-year-old girl was celebrating at home with a friend when she received a video on her Snapchat account of two schoolmates calling her racist and derogatory names. When her adoptive father Brad Knudson found out, he decided to do something about it. After recording the bullying, he managed to contact the father of the kids in the video, Deron Puro, and explain his abhorrence. Read More
In sinister technology news, Facebook has announced that it will allow users to choose a “steward” to inherit their account when they die. The question is, who would be the best person to maintain your online ‘legacy’ once you’re gone? According to this new policy whoever is chosen as the “digital heir” will be able to: “[..]post an obituary, update information such as profile and cover photos, respond to new friend requests and moderate posts and messages left on the profile. Read More