Tag » working women
Women of the workplace, unite! Even your office building’s air conditioner is sexist, new research suggests. This week, two scientists (both male, thanks fellas!) published a study revealing the guidelines most office buildings use to set temperatures were created in the 60s, when women were largely absent from office environments. You know, because we weren’t wanted there and women aren’t fit for work outside the home, blah, blah. With only male employees, the “thermal comfort model” equation was formulated with male metabolic rates in mind. Read More
Roxane Gay has always had a full schedule, and fortunately for her followers, it seems she’s only getting busier. Following the May 2014 release of her first novel, An Untamed State, Gay’s collection of essays titled Bad Feminist became a New York Times bestseller. Its success sent her on a national book tour and propelled her in the direction of “household name” status (a feminist scholar developing this much clout? We are so excited about Gay. Read More
If you have not already seen the World Toughest Job vid floating around your news feed, take a look before you read on. It's pretty damn sweet.  This video is not only a clear reminder of the undeniable love and dedication required to be a parent and mother, but it is also a lesson about women's work. Labor has historically been divided along gender lines in families; women are in charge of the the home, and men handle outside work. Read More
Trigger Warning: slightly graphic imagery For the artist Eliza Bennett, her flesh is her medium; in embroidering her palm with thick threads, she hopes to explore the ways in which we view gender roles. Her hand, swollen and bruised by her own careful work, is titled “A Woman’s Work Is Never Done,” and her gruesomely precise handiwork serves to remind the viewer of the strife of women laborers, many of whom are paid far less than their male counterparts. Read More
  “I don’t believe you should be working at a company where you’re going to be beating your head against a wall,” says Betty Spence of the National Association for Female Executives of the subpar hiring and promoting of women executives in most major companies, ”When you’ve got so many other things to deal with in your life, why should you have to deal with Neanderthals?” Despite all the talented businesswomen in our country, the top 1,000 American companies only employ women in 4. Read More
Popcorn Venus, 2012. Joyce II. When you think of women photographers who work in self-portraiture, you probably think of Cindy Sherman. The artist has made a career of transforming herself into everything from a bleached blonde spray-tanned socialite to Mae West. Her impressive body of work is such that she appears to be everywhere, capable of metamorphosing into anyone she chooses.    It’s almost impossible to work in self portraiture without being compared to Sherman, and the young and brilliant photographer Juno Calypso often is. Read More
  In response to a portrait of Cpl. Kristine Tejada featured alongside an Army magazine article, Col. Lynette Arnhart has launched complaints about the use of a conventionally attractive woman in military press materials. In what she believed to be a defense of women in the military, she wrote her peers about the issue: “Such photos undermine the rest of the message (and may even make people ask if breaking a nail is considered hazardous duty. Read More
  Stuart Varney, a host on Fox Business, thinks the absence of women in boardrooms has more to do with our hysterical, uterine-controlled brains than with discrimination. In discussion with Scottie Hughes of the Tea Party News Network, the host asked if companies should feel pressure to hire more women. Read More
  While searching for a temp job, the artist Coco Layne shaved the sides of her head. Soon after, she got an interview with a conservative clothing company. She wore a wig to conceal her unusual hairstyle. To fit in at work, she parted her hair in a more “feminine” way, covering the shaved areas of her head; she wore makeup.    She documented the transition in her gender presentation on film. Read More