Tag » women's health
  Alongside the topless portraits of young women under 40 years old who have survived breast cancer, the words “breast cancer is not a pink ribbon” speaks volumes. Fashion photographer David Jay shot the series of large-scale portraits, titled The Scar Project, to give an often-unseen look at the women who have battled early onset breast cancer, and who bear the scars to prove it.   The project gives a face to the thousands of women under 40 who are diagnosed with breast cancer every year, as well as a glimpse inside the reality of the disease. Read More
For years, men have had that little blue pill called Viagra that helps men improve their sex lives.  Well, fret no more, ladies, because a new drug is in the works to boost female sexual arousal.    Tefina is a testosterone gel that is undergoing clinical trials in Australia and Canada, according to i09.  But the sexiest part about this new drug - it's a nasal spray!  Yes, hot.  This drug is absorbed into the body through the nose within a few minutes, and affects the woman's sex drive within a few hours, according to ONENews. Read More
    This Is Personal, a new social media campaign by The National Women’s Law Center, aims to educate and empower young women on keeping our reproductive rights intact and personal (since they clearly are a personal issue).       The campaign’s site provides helpful visual resources that clearly explain policies that jeopardize our reproductive rights, like a map highlighting states that require invasive ultrasounds before having an abortion. Read More
Engaging lady voters is critical to winning the upcoming election—we are the majority of the population, after all—but looking at the “female vote” as a monolith ain’t the way to do it. A panel of four prominent political women, including Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards, MSNBC host and writer Melissa Harris-Perry, pollster Kellyanne Conway, and strategist Margaret Hoover, gathered at this year’s New Yorker Festival this past Saturday to take on the complexities of the female electorate. In short, it was ah-may-zing. Read More
A new study out of St. Louis confirms what all of us could have guessed: when given access to free birth control, women are less likely to have an unwanted pregnancy or get an abortion. More than 9,000 poor or uninsured women were given a choice of birth control methods available at no cost as part of the study conducted by the University of Washington in St. Louis on Thursday. The availability of free birth control led to only 4.4 to 7.5 abortions per 1,000 women involved, compared to an average of 13.4 to 17 per 1,000 women in the St. Read More