Tag » women in the workplace
Think back to your first tattoo. Maybe it happened in the basement of a friend’s house, crudely accomplished with a needle and string. Or perhaps you got inked in a shop with some burly dude behind the counter questioning your commitment to the tiny design you’d like forever etched onto your wrist. For plenty of people, doubt is a common theme for their first foray into the world of body modification. But while the first tattoo can be slightly awkward, and certainly nerve-wracking, it’s easy to get addicted to the buzz of the needle. Read More
We’re annoyed that workplace inequality is still A Thing, but as long as it persists, we need to keep talking about it. As you’re well aware, the wage gap is alive and well—and unlikely to close anytime soon. It’s also commonly known that some areas of the U.S. are much worse than others when it comes to circumstances for working women. Read More
So the NY Senate is planning to approve 8 bills on the subject of women’s rights. They're all pretty long overdue, but at least they're on the lineup. Read More
  Celebrity memoirs, autobiographies, and self-help books are all the rage, but what makes Girls star Lena Dunham’s stand out is that she actively avoids the old cliche topics that seem to be recycled from publication to publication; she admits, in her adorable self-effacing way, that she isn’t a mother, a businesswoman, a dietician, or a sex therapist. She’s herself, and that’s certainly book-worthy. Read More
  A recent Pantene ad titled “Labels Against Women” has sparked a feminist debate: is it okay for the company to use feminism to sell products? Some think that the use of feminism in advertising is a great way to appeal to the masses and to sneak difficult ideas on inequality and wage gaps into pop culture; the ad has been touted as a powerful beacon for women in the workplace. Read More
The premise of the New York Times’s recent piece on the stay-at-home husbands of female Wall Street execs was a must-click the minute I heard about it: the so-called “house husband” is one of my favorite answers to the nebulous question of how to Have It All. The article focuses on a growing class of families in wealthy suburban areas that are putting aside the traditional nuclear family structure for a more progressive and profitable alternative. Read More
  The average woman earns about 81 percent of what the average man doing the same job makes. Although we’ve made great strides in the last 25 years, the recent recession hasn’t helped decrease the pay gap. A recent study by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics revealed that women are paid more than men in only two full-time job fields. Business Insider used the BLS’s report to determine what American jobs have the largest pay gaps.    They discovered that jobs in sales are not so hospitable to female workers; on average women in the field make only 62. Read More
  In Showtime’s Homeland, CIA operative Carrie Mathison works mostly with men, and sometimes she is treated unfairly because of her gender. But it turns out this isn’t what the CIA is actually like these days. Two decades ago, there were many female agents in the field, but zero were in the highest ranks. Now? Four of the five and five of the top eight top agency members are women.   It all changed after the capture of bin Laden, who was followed and discovered by a group of female agents and officers referred to as “the Sisterhood. Read More
For today’s daily dose of disappointing news, Americans still think that men should rule the workplace! A recent Gallup poll reveals that American men and women would rather have a male boss than a female boss. While 40 percent of those polled listed no preference, those who did would rather have a man in charge.  Of the women polled, 40 percent favored having a male boss, whereas 27 percent preferred a female boss. These results are perhaps indicative of a lack of support of successful women in the workplace. Read More
A study at the Columbia Business School recently exposed how, in the work place, women are asked for help more frequently, and that their help is less appreciated than that of their male counterparts.  Sharon Meers, contributor to the Wall Street Journal, thinks this behavior may be an after-effect of teaching our children that neatness and niceness are virtues primarily for girls. Later in life, she muses, women are looked at merely as "merry wives of the workplace. Read More