Tag » women in television
Imagine a panel of female showrunners - the women who make the big decisions on hit series like Madame Secretary, VEEP, The Good Wife and Louie. Now, imagine that the panel hasn’t been billed as a pinkified, sparkly ~women in television~ event. That’s exactly what happened last week at the New York Television Film Fest. On Tuesday, October 20, NYTVF held its Creative Keynote Panel, titled “Running The Show; A Big Picture Conversation On Creating For The Small Screen. Read More
If you watch Game of Thrones, you’re surely familiar with the super-badass youngest Stark daughter, Arya. I personally find myself living for Arya’s scenes because she’s just plain spunky. It turns out, however, that the actress who plays Arya, Maisie Williams, is just as cool, clever, and courageous. This became clear after her interview last week with Evening Standard, where she spoke up about being a woman in Hollywood. Read More
Last week, Stephen Colbert wrote a sincere and hilarious essay for Glamour Magazine in which he pledged that his new CBS late night show will be for women. With all the current changes happening in late night, many of us ladies have repeatedly brought up the point that women are clearly missing from the late night game. Even with people all over voicing our strong objection to this ridiculous gap in representation, late night shows continue to be dominated by male hosts. That’s why it was at least somewhat refreshing to hear one of the men of late night acknowledge this problem. Read More
In her recent interview with Variety, Transparent creator Jill Soloway indicts Hollywood’s prioritizing of the male gaze. She’s nominated for quite a few accolades for her creation and writing for the Amazon hit Transparent—but as the article points out, she is one of only three women “(vs. 20 men) nominated in top comedy or drama series writer-director categories.” Soloway thinks that’s because it is still expected that men are at the center of stories. Read More
They’re made of sugar, spice, everything nice, and some Chemical X – and they’re coming back to the silver screen in 2016. Cartoon Network recently announced that The Powerpuff Girls will be resurrected ten years after the final episode. The only media released so far is the above photo, depicting the new voices of Townsville’s resident guardians: Amanda Leighton, Kristen Li and Natalie Palamides. Tom Kenny will reprise his role as the Narrator-Mayor. Read More
The old-as-time question of the feminist killjoy: Should I be enjoying this? I’ve found the answer is, typically, not really. Unless of course it’s 30 Rock, or Wanda Sykes standup. Girl Code is the MTV show that echoes VH1’s I Love the 80’s/90's in set-up and production. The show provides a litany of interview sound bytes from a variety of funny women, and a couple of dudes for “the male perspective.” *eye roll* What can be celebrated about this show is the unabashed women-centered and sometimes self-empowering conversation. Read More
  When Tina Fey pulled up her chair at the Saturday Night Live writers’ table, the show wasn’t all that woman-friendly. In her autobiographical book Bossypants, the comedien tells a story of how writers often assumed men in drag could be more funny than women. By the time she left, the show had featured more female greats than ever before: Amy Poehler, Maya Rudolf, Kristen Wiig, and others graced us with their unbeatable wit.    But wait a second! As Salon’s Carolyn Edgar points out, Keenan Thompson and Tracy Morgan are famed for their drag performances. Read More