Tag » unrealistic beauty standards
Once upon a time, beauty companies were telling women that their bodies weren't smooth enough, their faces clear enough, and their hair, shiny enough. However, after various body-positive movements in addition to all the feminist scholars critiquing the issue, companies have attempted to alter the explicit ways in which they enforce constant body surveillance. Now more recently, we are seeing women's beauty advertisements "praise" empowerment over body image. Take this new Pantene, "Sorry Not Sorry" commercial, for instance. Read More
In case you need more affirmation that beauty standards are a load of totally constructed baseless and ridiculous garbage, check out these vintage ads telling women that skinny is ugly, and gaining weight is necessary to look good and get dates:  For the most part, advertisements have been and continue to be the worst, and whether it's pressure to be curvy, thin, or a robot, it's incredibly unfair and completely unjust to make women feel they are somehow incomplete in very personal ways, so that companies can sell their products to fix a problem that never existed. Read More
  When we think of beauty pageants, we think of doe eyes, blond ringlets, and tiny waists; the bizarre ritual of choosing the most beautiful woman in the room seems antiquated and oppressive. But it turns out that prior to Women’s Liberation, pageantry was an even more surreal and shocking part of the American experience, and the queens provide insight into their contemporary social and political climate, cataloging the strange ways in which women were expected to express Western ideals of feminine beauty and grace. Read More
  The photographer Alex John Beck knows faces; his portraits have been featured in New York Magazine and in the ad images of Ralph Lauren. Facial beauty in the cosmetic industry is often thought to be the result of symmetry; fashion and glamour images are often altered to make a model’s face appear more symmetrical. Read More
Eliezer Álvarez, owner of a small mannequin factory in Valencia, Venezuela, has created the kind of woman he believes the public desires—one with, as the New York Times reports, “a bulging bosom and cantilevered buttocks, a wasp waist and long legs, a fiberglass fantasy, Venezuelan style.” With the introduction of his new mannequins, Álvarez witnessed an incredible surge in sales, and now, these horribly inaccurate portrayals of the female body are the standard across most Venezuelan stores. Read More