Tag » toys
Ever walked down a children’s toy aisle and been confronted with the glamorously overdone faces of dolls for six year olds? Please don’t lose hope for the world just yet: three companies are striving to create dolls that build girls up with representations of natural beauty—and the best news is, they're becoming popular products.    You might remember the guy who created Queens of Africa to make his niece proud of the way she looked. The beautiful dolls usurped Barbie in Africa because they actually resembled the skin tone of the children playing with them. Read More
Maybe you've heard of Lammily before. She's the new girl in town, created by designer Nickolay Lamm, not to compete with Barbie dolls, but to offer a more realistic doll as an option for kids. In fact, Lammily is designed with the proportions of an average 19-year-old woman, and has a greater range of motion than a normal Barbie — all the better for starting her own small business or becoming a pilot or winning an Olympic Gold Medal, whatever your imagination desires (maybe even all of the above). Read More
This 1981 LEGO ad featuring this adorable red head and a very feminist and very true message about children, creativity, and leaving the whole gender stereotype thing at the door, has recently blown up a lot of news feeds: LEGO was selling "Universal Building Sets," and saying specifically with this image that being a builder, creator, or inventor, is never gendered.   Unfortunately, the reason this ad has resurfaced with a vengeance is because LEGO doesn't seem to believe that so much anymore. Read More
  Don’t you just hate it when all the boys get to swim with the sharks and the girls get left behind standing stiffly on the shore? Let me explain: while LEGO manufactures male figures all dressed and ready to go on riveting and imaginative adventures, the females are often stuck twiddling their non-opposable thumbs.    But thanks to vocal adult and child collectors, that’s beginning to change; after all, the company recently released a badass female scientist. Read More
  Barbie’s place in adolescence and constructed femininity has baffled psychologists and feminist alike: on one hand, she’s a patient confidante onto which girls might project their hopes and aspirations. But she also espouses limited and damaging views on female roles, bodies, and sexuality. She sends conflicting messages, passively listening to you for hours while remaining inhumanly cold. As girls, we intuitively pick up that Barbie is “grown up” and “sexy,” but she doesn’t have genitals and therefore cannot be understood as a sexual agent. Read More
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