Tag » technology
Monday, news of Marissa Mayer being named Yahoo’s newest CEO broke. Mayer had worked at Google for thirteen years, and will now be at the helm of a major tech company-one of the biggest male dominated sectors. Woo hoo! According to an Associated Press story, the organization Catalyst (which tracks women’s workplace advancement), says that only 4% of the top Fortune 500 companies are women. Even better. But 37-year-old Mayer’s got even more on her plate. Read More
Just a few days ago, the BUST blog reported on the huge fail of a campaign that the European Commission launched in a somewhat laughable attempt to “overturn clichés” related to women and science.  Now a recent series on the Txchnologist blog reminds us that, though there definitely aren’t enough women in science at the moment, women have done amazing things to help move our world forward for centuries. And Txchnologist somehow manages to convey the message all in a totally inoffensive (and lipstick-free) manner! Take note European Commission. Read More
Some of my biggest Facebook pet peeves include, but are not limited to, the following: incessant complaining, unnecessary relationship updates (wait, aren't all relationships inherently complicated? Exactly why is yours so special and beyond my comprehending?), and minute-to-minute pregnancy progress reports. People who are a part of these annoying Facebook phenomena should be banned from the internet. Read More
In today's world, where 12-year-olds are engrossed in their iPhones, and substituting a phone call in place of a text message is nearly inconceivable, technology like Nokia’s indestructible brick of a cell phone and the VCR that’s currently collecting dust in your basement (if not already inhabiting a dumpster) seems prehistoric. But thanks to nostalgic noise enthusiast Brendan Chilcutt—the face behind The Museum of Endangered Sounds, highlighted in a WeTheUrban post earlier this month—the unmistakable sounds of old technology are alive and kicking. Read More
I know young people are supposed to be hip and tech-savvy (and by using the terms "hip" and "tech-savvy" I do, in fact, realize I've outed myself as neither), but sometimes I find myself genuinely overwhelmed with how quickly technology is advancing and all the crazy cool possibilities that come with it. Here I am, still flabbergasted that you can pay for your Starbucks coffee using a QR code, while artist Yiying Lu is already using them to create stunning and interactive works of art in her new series "Beautiful Traps. Read More
Do you think technology helps or hinders our relationships? Do pictures capture fake smiles? Can a conversation over a computer or a phone compare to spending time with someone in person? This is the theme explored in Small, Beautifully Moving Parts, a new movie that opened May 11th. Written and directed by Annie J. Howell and Lisa Robinson, it has been honored at several film festivals this year.   Viewers follow the main character, Sarah, as she journeys across the country to reunite with her estranged mother. Read More
The weather is getting colder and the ultimate cuddle buddy is primed for its comeback: a book! Sometimes, a girl wants one to stretch the horizons of her brain (and not just her heartstrings--I'm talking about you Harper Collins Romance!), so it's great that books like New Art/Science Affinities exist.  The book, co-published by Carnegie Mellon University's Miller Gallery and the STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, is 190 pages of contemporary art focusing on artists that blend the lines of art, science, and technology. Read More
Tiffany Shlain, the filmmaker who brought us reproductive rights documentary Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness and explored American Jewish identity via Barbie dolls in The Tribe, is back with Connected: An Autoblogography About Life, Death, and Technology. Read More
According to the New York Times, less than 15 percent of Wikipedia's hundreds of thousands of contributors are women. And the issue isn't simply that more entries are written by men, but the distinct lack of information on "feminine" topics: a big deal, considering Wikipedia has become a huge source of how people get their information. The Times points out how topics like baseball cards or video games get huge pages, while friendship bracelets, Sex and the City, and female writers get a scant few. Read More