Tag » sundance
Picked as the opening night film for the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, Hello I Must Be Going stars Melanie Lynskey as Amy, a 35-year-old who moves back into her parents’ suburban home seeking refuge following her divorce and begins an affair with 19-year-old actor, Jeremy (Christopher Abbott). Writer Sarah Koskoff says the film is a story she’s wanted to tell for a long time, a story “about somebody who’s always in the background of her own life. The one who gives the narcissists the attention they need—and really pays for it. Read More
“I think most people haven’t seen sexy in a wheelchair” –Mia  The Sundance Channel’s new series, Push Girls, documents the lives of four friends living in Hollywood--Angela, Auti, Tiphany, and Mia. No, they aren’t rich housewives, celebrities with a sex tape, or former B-list actors trying to make a comeback: they are paraplegic and quadriplegic women, and they are out to dispel any of your previously contrived notions about life in a wheelchair with in-your-face confidence. Read More
The Sundance Channel must have a degree in making educational yet totally captivating shows, unlike most enriching television which lulls me to premature slumber. Instead Sundance pumps out series like Big Ideas for a Small Planet and Green Porno with Isabella Rosellini, which are hysterical and make me feel a little bit smarter. Read More
The snow is falling here again, and the Sundance Film Festival is still plowing through the town of Park City. I’ve been to 21 films so far and the main theme that I’ve noticed is the overwhelming presence of strong female leads and women directors.  One of the hottest films here is Beasts of the Southern Wild, a truly original film that takes place in the swamps of Louisiana, and stars a six year old girl named Quvanzhand Wallis. Read More

Dispatches From Sundance

BY Laurie in Movies

We sent our favorite photographer (and Laurie’s main squeeze) Michael Lavine to The Sundance Film Festival to check out the festival and report back to us on what’s good this year. _____________________________________________ While deeply entrenched in the insanity known as Sundance, I spend most of my time shuttling from theater to theater, waiting in line, watching movies and then talking to strangers about said movies while waiting in another line or standing uncomfortably close on another shuttle. Read More
Director, performance artist, writer, and actress Miranda July is the indie film world’s favorite female face. Best known for her 2005 debut feature, Me and You and Everyone We Know, and her follow-up collection of short stories, No One Belongs Here More Than You, she has been near and dear to us here at BUST since before she graced our cover in 2007. So when I found out she was debuting her second feature film, The Future, at Sundance, I was excited to go check it out and then chat with July about it. Read More

Review of The Woods

BY Laurie in Arts

  The Woods, which premiered this week at Sundance, is a film about a band of revolutionaries living off the grid and Wi-ing away their time on a big screen TV plugged into a tree.  They stuff their faces with products you would find in a Super Wal-Mart snack isle, like hot pockets, cheez-its and boxed juice concentrate.  Its a little like a contemporary Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, with all the technicolor flag defacing anti establishment antics of The Merry Pranksters, but instead of LSD, these kids are sucking down Yellow #5. Read More

Sundance Days 2, 3 and 4.

BY Laurie in Feminism

Well, I was so busy running around to screenings that I did not have time to post every day like planned, so here are my 3 days squished into one report. Sundance is a great festival, it's filled with people passionate about telling stories, and I met so many smart and creative folks, it really was worth driving in a blizzard and white knuckling it down a mountain to be here (more on that later! Saturday started off with an invite to see the premiere of a documentary by Jennifer Siebel Newsom (any relation to Joanna I wonder?) called Miss Representation. Read More
There’s definitely a dearth of women filmmakers. So when you know a film comes out created by women, you know it’s special.  Before Tomorrow is one of these films. It’s written & Directed by Marie-Hélène Cousineau and Madeline Piujuq Ivalu. But not only is it made by Inuit women’s video collective Arnait Video Productions, it tells the tale of a relationship not often portrayed in film: the strong bond between a grandson and his grandmother. Read More